Are speedloaders totally worthless for a small revolver?


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White Horseradish
June 19, 2006, 01:35 AM
I have a S&W model 36 and a recently aquired Charter Arms Undercover. They are supposed to use the same speedloader.

I got the HKS twist-knob speedloader and I can't make it work. It catches on the grips and sticks.

Are other kinds of speedloaders slimmer and easier to work with?

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Chuck Dye
June 19, 2006, 01:47 AM
To the best of my memory, ( :eek: )all of the grip manufacturers I have checked out have made specific reference to speedloader use and whether the grip is relieved for speedloaders. You need to replace your grips or relieve the ones you have. The problem is the grip, not the speedloader. Take a look at aftermarket grip web sites for a visual.

RyanM
June 19, 2006, 01:49 AM
I have a Jetloader, which I use for my SP-101 with the factory grips, which are apparently infamous for catching on speedloaders. No trouble so far.

I like Jetloaders a lot. They're extremely fast since you can get your firing hand back onto the gun a lot faster, if you use the loading technique where your left hand holds the gun by the cylinder, and the right hand inserts the loader. Swing out the cylinder and eject empties as usual. Then instead of ramming the speedloader home while holding it, push it in partway and once the rounds are in the chambers most of the way, get a firing grip with your right hand (finger off trigger, of course), and finish pushing with your thumb. Then close the cylinder and fire.

The Charter Arms undercover is a 5-shot .38 that just uses standard J-frame sized speedloaders, right? Jetloaders are only made in 5-shot J-frame/SP-101, 6-shot K-frame, and 6 shot L-frame/GP-100 sizes.

roscoe
June 19, 2006, 02:16 AM
My problem with spedloaders is that flat points or hollowpoints don't really glide into the cylinder. One hollowpoint always hangs up for a second, so I have to wiggle the whole set into place. It does keep the ammo organized, however.

RioShooter
June 19, 2006, 02:27 AM
I got the HKS twist-knob speedloader and I can't make it work. It catches on the grips and sticks.

I use an HKS speedloader with my Model 36 for IDPA shooting. No problems with the correct grips.

White Horseradish
June 19, 2006, 02:46 AM
I've been googling different speedloaders just now and Maxfire seems kinda interesting. Anybody use them? www.speedloaders.com

Croyance
June 19, 2006, 02:54 AM
You generally want grips that has the left one relieved for speed loaders. Old style grips just weren't made to give speed loaders clearance.

RON in PA
June 19, 2006, 03:53 AM
I use Bianchi Speed Strips, they conceal well and while not as fast as a speed loader, with practice they beat fooling with loose rounds.

Dienekes
June 19, 2006, 04:05 AM
Have had an HKS for J frame for quite a few years. It works as long as you have proper grip clearance, but have never seen much of a purpose for it. No one in his right mind relies on a J frame for extended gun battles, and the vast majority of incidents are settled in fewer than five rounds. Besides the idea is to avoid trouble, not poke it with a stick...

I do carry six extra rounds in an MTM flat case on principle; probably the oldest one in continous use, circa 1981.

HiWayMan
June 19, 2006, 09:34 AM
Maxfires are crap. They fail to retain the rounds in a drop. They put excessive force on the yoke and crane. Seemed like a good plan, but in practice they leave everything to be desired. Stick with HKS or Safariland. I prefer the Sarfariland C-1 for concealed carry in a pocket, but the C-2 would work well in pouches.

SouthpawShootr
June 19, 2006, 09:50 AM
I like the Safariland speedloaders better, however, I can reload a J frame quicker with speedstrips than with speedloaders (just the opposite with larger frames, btw). I don't like speedloaders anyway. They're difficult to hide and aren't efficient sizewise. You could carry in your pocket but they get full of lint quickly. I already dedicate a front pocket to my 642. The other front pocket is used for my ID and back pocket is for my checkbook, so I really don't have space during the summer months for any more junk in my pockets. Dillon markets a belt mounted speedstrip case that's nice and flat. I have 4 J-frames, all wearing grips relieved for speedloaders, btw.

LanEvo`
June 19, 2006, 10:21 AM
I use both the Safariland Comp II (http://www.safariland.com/products.asp?id=168) and HKS speedloaders with my L-frame Smiths. I find the Comp II is more compact, easier to use, and holds the rounds tighter (less wiggling around). This makes for quicker reloads compared to the HKS.

Here's a pic of the Comp II:
http://www.safariland.com/images/catalog/COMP%20II_l.jpg

wheelgunslinger
June 19, 2006, 10:45 AM
another vote for the Safariland Comp 2. It's all I use, presently.

And, yes, the grips must be for use of a speedloader. Aren't you glad you decided to practice the drill in a safe place before you needed to do it? Good luck.

Sulaco
June 19, 2006, 12:17 PM
I am going today at lunch to pickup an SP101 for concealed carry. I had toyed with the idea of speed loaders (and I have tried both the HKS and the Safariland brands) but never could get used to them. I found them difficult to use with smaller guns like the J frame and the SP101. I think I will try the Bianchi Speedstrips this time around. I like how flat they are also.

JNewell
June 19, 2006, 03:03 PM
Change the grips

What he wrote. Not useless, arguably more necessary for smaller vs. larger revolvers.

I like the Comp 1 loaders for carry - they are more compact. Speedstrips are even more compact, but slower than a speedloader.

geekWithA.45
June 19, 2006, 10:43 PM
+1 on the safariland loaders.

Just cram it in, close the cylinder, let it drop.

MCgunner
June 19, 2006, 10:54 PM
1) Safariland works better'n any HKS for me

2) change the grips

3) I've had J frames also catch the speedloader with the cylinder thumb release and had to take it off and bevel it with a grinder to get clearance.

May take a little work, new grip or something, but you can make it work.

gezzer
June 19, 2006, 11:30 PM
I use Bianchi Speed Strips, they conceal well and while not as fast as a speed loader, with practice they beat fooling with loose rounds.


+1

Ichiro
June 21, 2006, 12:01 AM
I'm going to have to try the Safariland.

Everything that has been said is true. Grips make the difference. With my SP-101 and either stock grips or Pachy's, the HKS speedload simply does not work. You'd be better off with loose rounds in your pocket.

With CTC grips on both my SP and 642, the HKS works OK, but not great. A slimmer speedloader is needed.

And speed strips are even worse than the HKS. I can't imagine trying to load from those things under stress. Carrying two snubbies would be much better.

~Ichiro

SouthpawShootr
June 21, 2006, 12:28 AM
As with anything, practice will help tremendously. Lots of people I know will carry 2 revolvers when they're packing a wheelie. I've done it from time to time. Most of the time, I'll have a Kahr or a Glock on my hip and a 642 in my pocket. I've actually known people to be able to reload quite quickly with speedstrips, myself included. S&W factory stocks for some time have been Uncle Mikes boot grips or Hogue Bantam grips. Both of these are relieved for speedloaders, maybe not enough though. The old J-frame service grips might be better in that area. My Crimson Trace grips (the hard plastic model, not the rubber overmolded) on my 642 has a generous relief for speedloaders.

I have a few Jet Loaders for my K/L frames. These are the absolute fastest I've ever tried. Only problem is they are big and I doubt they're available for J-frames.

Croyance
June 21, 2006, 02:59 AM
Carrying two revolvers = NY reload.
The NYPD taught their detectives and officers to draw their second revolver rather than try to reload in the middle of a firefight. With the adrenaline and no fine motor skills, I don't know how I'm going to take rounds out of a speed strip and get them into their holes.
And what city was it where a police officer was trying to reload his revolver in an alley firefight, couldn't do so quickly, and the bad guy just walked right up and shot him?
Anything that takes co-ordination is out.

wixedmords
June 21, 2006, 10:32 AM
I am guessing that the grips on your Undercover are non-stock. The grips on my Police Undercover have no issues with HKS speedloaders. In fact, the stock rubber finger-groove type of grips are likey my favorite for a snubby.

For me, the stock rubber grips give the gun a very natural point of aim. I would look into them.

Brian Williams
June 21, 2006, 01:43 PM
NO, but moonclips and 9mm rock.

Bart Noir
June 21, 2006, 04:25 PM
....take rounds out of a speed strip and get them into their holes
If you are talking about the rubber Bianchi Speed Strips, then I suggest another look at the owner's manual :rolleyes:

The rounds leave the strip as they go into the cylinder, 2 then 2 then 1 more. Leaving you with the 6th one as a spare, in case you drop one.

Now, I could be wrong as I have no J-Frame to practice on (not quite a sin, but I know I am at fault - I do own nice wooden grips for 2 of those J-frames I don't have). Is it the case that the spacing of the holes on a J-Frame cylinder (2 at a time) is too tight to allow the proper use of the Bianchi strips?

Bart Noir

SouthpawShootr
June 21, 2006, 04:31 PM
Is it the case that the spacing of the holes on a J-Frame cylinder (2 at a time) is too tight to allow the proper use of the Bianchi strips?

Works fine for me. Never had a problem with that.

1557
June 21, 2006, 05:04 PM
+1 on the Austrian Jetloaders.I have a drawer full of them for K frames and quite a few for the J frame. Really fast if you're a practiced revolver man.

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