Recovered USMC M40A1 sniper rifle


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nbkky71
June 22, 2006, 05:04 PM
Here's an interesting story: Marine scount snipers killed an insurgent and recovered an M40A1 sniper rifle. This rifle was taken by insurgents when 4 Marines were killed in an ambush in June, 2004.

http://www.marines.mil/marinelink/image1.nsf/Lookup/200662233939/$file/060621-M-8112O-RIFLE2lr.jpg

Full story here:
http://www.marines.mil/marinelink/mcn2000.nsf/lookupstoryref/200662233458

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Hoppy590
June 22, 2006, 05:14 PM
not like they could even use that rifle to its best. probbily tried to load 7.62x54 in it.

glad to see such a piece of art is back in the corps hands

Roadwild17
June 22, 2006, 05:18 PM
Doubt they would have access to the proper 7.62 for that thing. Even if they could get 7.62X51 it’s like putting 87 octane into a Ferrari.

slzy
June 22, 2006, 05:33 PM
would'nt you imagine they scarfed up everything they could carry when they got the rfle?

K-Romulus
June 22, 2006, 05:49 PM
http://www.marines.mil/marinelink/mcn2000.nsf/ad983156332a819185256cb600677af3/0b6a3eed77fe183a852571950026a180?OpenDocument

Cold_B
June 22, 2006, 06:38 PM
That picture shows a corpsman holding the weapon.





edited for spelling

striker3
June 22, 2006, 06:59 PM
not like they could even use that rifle to its best. probbily tried to load 7.62x54 in it.


Why do you think that? While there are quite a few untrained insurgents out there, there are also some trained at a professional level. Think about the different levels of training exibited by people here in the US. It is no different over there.

Think of this. That rifle was used by the enemy for 2 years before being recaptured! If you read the below story, it was only by luck that a Marine sniper team was in the right place to observe the enemy sniper team.

http://www.usmc.mil/marinelink/mcn2000.nsf/main5/0B6A3EED77FE183A852571950026A180?opendocument (USMC story)

Darkhorse snipers kill insurgent sniper, recover stolen Marine sniper rifle
June 20, 2006; Submitted on: 06/22/2006 03:01:57 AM ; Story ID#: 20066223157

By Cpl. Mark Sixbey, 1st Marine Division




CAMP HABBANIYAH, Iraq - Lt. Col. Patrick Looney, battalion commander for 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, holds the last round chambered in a Marine M-40A1 sniper rifle, which spent two years in enemy hands. A 21-year-old sniper from Sniper Section Four killed the insurgent June 16. The Darkhorse battalion plans to mount the round on a plaque to present to snipers of 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment Magnificent Bastards, who lost four Marines and the rifle in Ramadi in June 2004.

CAMP HABBANIYAH, Iraq (June 20, 2006) -- Scout snipers from 3rd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment killed an enemy sniper and recovered a Marine sniper rifle lost nearly two years ago during a mission near Habbaniyah June 16.

The rifle was the one formerly used by four Marines of 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment who were killed on a rooftop in Ramadi June 21, 2004.

Sniper Section Four was in a hide when the spotter observed a military-aged male inside a nearby parked car videotaping a passing patrol of amphibious assault vehicles. The Marines saw a rifle stock by the insurgent’s side.

“We were in the right place at the right time,” said Sgt. Kevin Homestead an infantryman from K Company serving as a spotter for the sniper team that day.

They first radioed the passing Marines and told them they were being watched by an enemy sniper and to stay low. The insurgent then sealed his own fate by preparing the weapon. The 21-year-old Marine sniper, who declined to be interviewed – aimed in at the gunman’s head behind the rear-side window.

He recited a mantra in his head. Breathe, relax, aim, squeeze, surprise.

The enemy sniper died with the gun in his lap.

They dialed K Company – or Samurai 6 – and reported the target was dead.

“We then saw another military-aged male ... enter the passenger side door,” said Homestead, 26, from Ontario, Ore. “He was surprised to see the other shooter was killed.”

The second insurgent scurried around the car and jumped in the driver’s seat.

With the sniper now spotting for him, Homestead aimed in with his M-4 carbine and put three bullets in the driver before he could start the car.

A squad of K Company Marines came to the position and saw the sniper dead and the driver shot three times. The driver died as soon as the squad arrived on scene.

They pulled out the sniper rifle and immediately recognized that it was an M-40A1, the same used by the snipers of 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment in 2004.

The trunk of the car contained a pistol, a hand grenade, dozens of 7.62 mm rounds, multiple license plates and several camcorder tapes.

“When we saw the scope and stock, we knew what it was,” Homestead said.

The rifle was missing for nearly two years – almost to the day. Marines believed the insurgent they killed, or those closely associated with him, had it all along. It is unknown how many times it was used against U.S. and Iraqi forces.

“He was a very good sniper,” Homestead said. “But he got cocky and slipped up and it was our time to catch that.”

The weapon came full circle, having originally belonged to the Darkhorse battalion in Operation Iraqi Freedom I, who turned it over to the “Magnificent Bastards” of 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment. Coincidentally, a Darkhorse sniper killed the insurgent sniper, and a former Magnificent Bastard killed the spotter.

Darkhorse battalion had been dealing with sporadic sniper attacks since arriving in Iraq in January. Now, Marines have one less sniper to worry about.

“It’s very rewarding to take them out the way we did,” said Lt. Col. Patrick G. Looney, the battalion commander. “Doubly rewarding that it’s a 2/4 sniper rifle, even though it won’t bring back the four Marines who were killed that day.”

Triple rewarding that it won’t be used on another Marine or soldier, he added.

“The credit has to go to Sgt. Homestead and the Sniper Section leader who made the kill,” said 1st Lt. J. H. Cusack, Sniper Platoon commander. “It was more than being in the right place at the right time.

“It was the culmination of all of the training and planning the section leader had done up until that moment,” Cusak added. “Being absolutely alert and focused to detect a small clue during a period of apparent inactivity and a perfectly executed shot.”

Darkhorse snipers have since removed the powder and primer from the last 7.62 mm round chambered in the recaptured rifle. They will mount it on a plaque and present it to the Magnificent Bastards’ snipers to honor their lost Marines.

Looney said the ability to give some retribution for their loss makes the day a “grand-slam home run for sniper ops.” He credited the snipers’ professionalism and attitude in accomplishing the mission throughout their area of operations.

“I would say that the guys who shot are typical of the Darkhorse snipers,” said Looney, 43, from Oceanside, Calif. “They’re very proficient, very modest, very busy. They’re out there almost daily doing great things in this AO and our old AO. The fact that they’re taking a back seat and letting the battalion reap the benefits is typical of the kind of Marines they are.”

Roadwild17
June 22, 2006, 07:03 PM
Just some wishful think on my part. It sucks just thinking that a solder could have been killed by a weapon his brother made:barf: .

Wes Janson
June 22, 2006, 07:18 PM
Somehow it seems to me like it would be more appropriate to put it back into service. A message to the enemy: "You may have taken our rifle, but we've taken back what belongs to us, and now we're going to use it the way it should be: to take you out."

striker3
June 22, 2006, 07:23 PM
Somehow it seems to me like it would be more appropriate to put it back into service. A message to the enemy: "You may have taken our rifle, but we've taken back what belongs to us, and now we're going to use it the way it should be: to take you out."

Now that would be a fitting tribute.

hksw
June 22, 2006, 08:10 PM
Hmm. Although probably cost prohibitive, I wonder if it would be a good idea to place or permanently imbed GPS locators in our troop's equipment. It would make it easier to locate the possesor.

DoubleTapDrew
June 22, 2006, 08:23 PM
Hmm. Although probably cost prohibitive, I wonder if it would be a good idea to place or permanently imbed GPS locators in our troop's equipment. It would make it easier to locate the possesor.
Sounds to me like that could do more harm than good by giving away every troop's position to an enemy that got ahold of a military GPS unit.
We'll just have to keep taking them out the old fashoned way :evil:

Chipperman
June 22, 2006, 08:35 PM
"The Unertl scope was missing, replaced by a Tasco, but otherwise, the rifle was in good working order."

:scrutiny:

Why would they remove one scope, and replace it with another inferior scope? :confused:

Eleven Mike
June 22, 2006, 08:38 PM
It is a de-milled cartridge being mounted on a plaque, not the rifle.

What will happen to the rifle is still a question to be answered. Marines from RCT-5 are tracking down which unit should own it, according to how weapons sets were passed among deploying battalions. And the M-40A1s are being phased out for M-40A3s, a newer version used by Marines now.

Booker said he’d hate to see the weapon go back into use, knowing insurgents used it to try, and possibly did, kill Marines.

“There are evil spirits on it,” Booker said. Instead, he thinks it should be preserved.

“I would like to see it sit in a place of honor,” he added.

Kennedy said his battalion never brought home any war trophies. There was a memorial service to honor their 35 killed in action, but no lasting memorial exists at the battalion’s headquarters.

Kennedy said this rifle might be the appropriate memorial to all his Marines killed.

“Maybe if it was hung in the battalion area,” he said, “it would be a fitting memory to those four and the rest.”

Eleven Mike
June 22, 2006, 08:40 PM
Why would they remove one scope, and replace it with another inferior scope? Perhaps they broke the Unertl.

Bob R
June 22, 2006, 09:18 PM
That picture shows a coreman holding the weapon.

Whenever you find the Navy, wherever you find the Marine Corps, there you will find the Navy Hospital Corpsman. In times of peace, he or she toils unceasingly, day and night, providing quality care to numerous beneficiaries. In times of war, he is on the beaches with the Marines, employed in amphibious operations, in transportation of wounded by air, on the battlefield, and on all types of ships, submarines, aircraft carriers, and landing craft. In short, wherever medical services may be required, the Hospital Corpsman is there, not only willing but also prepared to serve his or her country and his fellow man above and beyond the call of duty.

http://home.epix.net/~nooyawka/corps.htm

I would wager a bet that the HM's (and Army combat medics) as a group are the most decorated of any group of people that have ever served in uniform.

bob

bogie
June 22, 2006, 10:58 PM
Unertly's scopes aren't the world's strongest, and they also require moderately specialized knowledge to adjust. I'll guess they probably dropped it...

slzy
June 23, 2006, 12:45 AM
i have just started reading Flags of Our Fathers by James Bradley,whos father Jack is the man in clear profile raising the flag at Iwo Jima,was a Navy Corpsman who won the Navy Cross for action unrelated to the flag raising. Not only was he courageous,he was modest,as his family was not aware of the award until after his death in 1994.

larry_minn
June 23, 2006, 02:04 AM
Quote "Booker said he’d hate to see the weapon go back into use, knowing insurgents used it to try, and possibly did, kill Marines.

“There are evil spirits on it,” Booker said. Instead, he thinks it should be preserved " end quote

The gun has evil spirits? I remember a TV show about a (evil) gun that every owner used it to kill someone. Typical hollyweird crap.
A person not comfortable with it fine.

p35
June 23, 2006, 11:56 AM
FWIW, I hear that there are plans out there to build a GPS into the stock of every new generation rifle. Not to broadcast, but to help the soldier know where he is.

hksw
June 23, 2006, 01:11 PM
Sounds to me like that could do more harm than good by giving away every troop's position to an enemy that got ahold of a military GPS unit.

Well, if you keep the trackers well behind the lines and forward information only via voice you could keep it pretty safe.

tegemu
June 23, 2006, 03:52 PM
Cold B, Corpsmen are shooters too.

HankB
June 23, 2006, 03:59 PM
“There are evil spirits on it,”IMHO the best way to exorcise any "evil spirits" on the rifle would be to use it on bad guys . . . a LOT of bad guys . . .

JesseJames
June 23, 2006, 04:18 PM
F*****G OUTSTANDING SHOOTING.

Danus ex
June 24, 2006, 03:29 AM
The gun has evil spirits? I remember a TV show about a (evil) gun that every owner used it to kill someone. Typical hollyweird crap.
A person not comfortable with it fine.

That was a Hawaii Five-0 episode!

Tory
June 24, 2006, 12:23 PM
Quote:

The gun has evil spirits? I remember a TV show about a (evil) gun that every owner used it to kill someone. Typical hollyweird crap.
A person not comfortable with it fine.

That was a Hawaii Five-0 episode!

NO; that was Dead Man's Gun. I enjoyed that series and wish they would re-run it (God knows they've re-run everything else to death!).

akodo
June 24, 2006, 07:39 PM
i have just started reading Flags of Our Fathers by James Bradley,whos father Jack is the man in clear profile raising the flag at Iwo Jima,was a Navy Corpsman who won the Navy Cross for action unrelated to the flag raising. Not only was he courageous,he was modest,as his family was not aware of the award until after his death in 1994.

I didn't know this until a local home state news station interviewed the man (WCCO TV IRC, in MN) but the truth of the matter is that famous photograph and the scupture on which it is based depicts the 2nd raising of the flag at Iwo Jima, a staged rasing for photographer. The old vet said few knew and many called him a liar, even though he had the documents to prove it. The news station did some digging and were able to back up the vet's story.

frmrmarine248666
June 27, 2006, 03:24 AM
Killing that insurgent sniper probably saved a lot of American lives. The insurgent sniper was using a car and videotaping the whole event. If any of you have seen the insurgent sniper propoganda video, then you know how many Americans that rifle has probably killed. In the video, the insurgent is almost always shooting out of a car while videotaping. The video shows about 20 to 30 American soldiers and Marines being shot by this sniper. It's probably not all the same guy, but the MO fits, so this insurgent has probably killed a sizeable number of Americans, and it's a good thing he's dead. I know I wouldn't want to use a gun that has killed that many Americans.

wheelgunslinger
June 27, 2006, 09:49 AM
I can understand what he's saying about the bad spirits. It's like saying that the rifle has bad mojo now. I wouldn't want to use it, either.
I've seen some of the insurgent videos, and if you think those guys are a bunch of hajii's who can't find their butt with both hands, you should watch them. Then, you'll understand why it's so difficult and frustrating for our troops.

I'd say the Unertl scope was likely broken in the attack, or the weapon was dropped. hence, the tasco. Scout/Snipers have done more with less.

Eleven Mike
June 27, 2006, 02:33 PM
Former Marine,

I've also seen the Jubei video, or whatever the name is. The music rocks, but most of the snipings in the video are botched. I don't know if any of the soldiers in the video died, and you don't know that this rifle was used in the video. It's my guess the terrorists recognized the quality of the weapon system, and gave it to someone with the skill to use it well without screwing up and getting captured or killed. Assuming that, it seems likely to me that it killed a few, video-taped or not, before that gentleman's skill ran short.

duckandcover
August 3, 2006, 06:49 PM
Just wanted to post the following link that has pictures and more info about the recovery of this rifle. Definitely a heads-up play by the U.S. sniper/countersniper team.

http://www.strategypage.com/gallery/articles/military_photos_200671902726.asp

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