Password-protected bullets


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dasmi
June 27, 2006, 12:48 PM
Things like this make me love my milsurps more and more.

http://www.newscientist.com/blog/invention/2006/06/password-protected-bullets.html


Password-protected bullets

Safety catches do not always prevent firearm accidents and even newfangled biometric guns, which check the identity of a user by their fingerprint, cannot stop thieves from using stolen ammunition in other weapons.

The way to make firearms really safe, says Hebert Meyerle of Germany, is to password-protect the ammunition itself.

Meyerle is patenting a design for a modified cartridge that would be fired by a burst of high-frequency radio energy. But the energy would only ignite the charge if a solid-state switch within the cartridge had been activated. This would only happen if a password entered into the gun using a tiny keypad matched one stored in the cartridge.

When they are sold, cartridges could be programmed with a password that matches the purchaser's gun. An owner could set the gun to request the password when it is reloaded, or to perform a biometric check before firing. The gun could also automatically lock itself after a pre-set period of time has passed since the password was entered.

The system would undoubtedly cost more than a conventional gun, but many firearm enthusiasts would surely pay a premium for such added security.

Read the password-protected bullets patent (http://tinyurl.com/equwb).

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leadcounsel
June 27, 2006, 12:53 PM
After having computers fail routinely for the last 15 years I've been using them, I would NEVER buy a gun that relied on any computer technology to function properly.

I see these added 'safety' features as making the gun MORE safe for the attacker and 'less' safe for the user.

DoubleTapDrew
June 27, 2006, 12:53 PM
Hold on, I gotta enter my PIN. :barf:
Instead of idiot-proofing things maybe they should enforce existing laws. Just a thought.

El Tejon
June 27, 2006, 12:57 PM
As long as only governments are required to use that technology, I am all for it!:)

dasmi
June 27, 2006, 01:01 PM
I'm sure Government agencies would be exempt from any law requiring this technology.

Henry Bowman
June 27, 2006, 01:01 PM
The system would undoubtedly cost more than a conventional gun, but many firearm enthusiasts would surely pay a premium for such added security.Sure. Who could argue with that? :rolleyes:

carterbeauford
June 27, 2006, 01:05 PM
...and will say it again. Guns are mechanical devices and have been for some 800 years. The day that changes is the day I stop shooting.

Preacherman
June 27, 2006, 01:20 PM
Lends an entirely new meaning to the "blue screen of death"! :eek:

Zundfolge
June 27, 2006, 01:22 PM
Said it before...
...and will say it again. Guns are mechanical devices and have been for some 800 years. The day that changes is the day I stop shooting.

That's exactly what they want.

"Smart Gun" technology is not about making guns safer, its about making them more expensive, less reliable and a loophole to outlaw all of the "non-smart" ones.


I seem to recall a flash animation/game where you had to enter the code and fire the weapon before the badguy killed you...iirc it was impossible.

1911Tuner
June 27, 2006, 01:26 PM
Yeah, that's exactly what we all need. Handgun ammo that costs 25 bucks a round...:rolleyes:

Sometimes I'm amazed at the unadulterated silliness of supposedly educated people. Problem is, that there are millions out there who give credence to their ramblings...and they're just as silly, if not moreso.
The other problem is, that some of the silliest ones are sitting in Congress...

All together now...--------> :eek:

offthepaper
June 27, 2006, 01:32 PM
Quote from Dasmi:
"Things like this make me love my milsurps more and more."
-----------------
Ain't it the truth. :D

hso
June 27, 2006, 01:33 PM
A solution looking for a problem.

ArmedBear
June 27, 2006, 01:45 PM
A lot of these ideas about securing ammunition -- legally or technologically -- assume that ammunition is very hard to make.

It's not. It's really easy. And it's really cheap.

Reloading may seldom be more economical than buying bulk ammo, but neither the equipment, the skills, nor the price are prohibitive.

In California, there was a law proposed that would require serial numbers on cases and bullets. Opponents said that criminals could easily reload their own, perhaps even with serial numbers that would be traced to OTHER people, by grabbing brass at any target range. Proponents tried to laugh it off, and said that criminals wouldn't go through the trouble.

Hmmm... These are the criminals who will steal a car for a no-trace getaway, build and operate meth labs, and get fake identification cards. But they wouldn't BOTHER to reload a few rounds to avoid having ammo traced back to their names (assuming the technology would even work)?

Right.

Punkermonkey
June 27, 2006, 01:55 PM
While they are at it, perhaps they should also password protect swimming pools, cars, gardening tools, cholestrol, and cancer. So they can make those safer too.

shooting time
June 27, 2006, 02:09 PM
I will bet the first states here will be Ny and *********** to enact a law every gun has to have this

rev214
June 27, 2006, 02:10 PM
aren't these called photon torpedoes???

sparx
June 27, 2006, 02:14 PM
Just think of the millions of rounds that would flood the black market as passwords are so easily cracked for the most part. I can just imagine the first several hundred-thousand rounds alone coming from guns that had little post-its stuck to the grip with the user's password conveniently written down!

If it can be cracked, it WILL be cracked... only a matter of time.

I guess guns will someday start coming with "Intel inside" stickers on them, too. I won't even try to guess what operating system will be used... certainly can't be Windows... breaks too easily. Besides, when you pull the trigger you would get a message that states "Windows has detected a change in your trigger position and will require a reboot. Continue?" And "OK" will be your only option. :what:

foghornl
June 27, 2006, 02:15 PM
burst of high-frequency radio energy

I can see it now...the guy next door cranks up his home-tuned "CB" with the 100-watt RF amplifier driving the 2,000-watt RF amplifier.....

FLASH! BOOM!

Or driving through one of the 'antenna farms' of radio/tv/cel-fone/public safety 2-way repeaters, etc....

Why do you think that in contruction areas where 'dynamite blasting' is going on, do they demand you turn off 2-way radios, cel-fones, etc ? ? ?

Kawasabi
June 27, 2006, 02:51 PM
I can see it already. Hackers will find a way to make the guns go off remotely.

Roadwild17
June 27, 2006, 03:20 PM
I think it would be kinda cool, you could load up all your handguns and make a base to hold them, Then just get a radio frequency generator and sweep the frequency range back and forth really fast, "Look maw, a poor mans SMG" :rolleyes:

XDKingslayer
June 27, 2006, 03:22 PM
After having computers fail routinely for the last 15 years I've been using them, I would NEVER buy a gun that relied on any computer technology to function properly.

That's funny. Being in the computer business my initial responce was completely opposite. Mine went "After seeing what people do to computers I would never give them a gun that relied on computers."

Funny how people at different ends of the spectrum see things.

pdowg881
June 27, 2006, 03:26 PM
Don't shoot! I forgot my password! When things get more complicated, more things can go wrong.

rev214
June 27, 2006, 03:29 PM
...high-frequency radio energy...

would this fall under the jurisdiction of the Federal Communications Commission?

Master Blaster
June 27, 2006, 03:33 PM
After every military and police department in the entire world adopts and uses this technology without a single failure for 50 years or so I will consider replacing my old outdated dumb guns.

Until then best of luck.

Third_Rail
June 27, 2006, 03:34 PM
rev214 - it actually may.

pdowg881
June 27, 2006, 03:37 PM
Better not have your radio or cell phone on, you may have an AD. I don't see how "firearm enthusiasts would surely pay a premium for such added security."
If I need my gun in a hurry I don't want to be worrying about circuits and radio frequencies and especially if the battery is charged. I want to be able to pick it up and shoot it in a hurry if I need to. Anybody here think they would pay a premium for such added security? The only way I can see this being good is if your strictly a target shooter or hunter, and have kids, and are too incompetent to use a good old fashioned lock and key, and opt for the more reliable computer and electronic security. I mean, I don't think I've ever heard of a single person whose had trouble with their computer or any kind of electronic device for that matter. In terms of reiliability mechanical usually will beat electronic.

fiVe
June 27, 2006, 05:05 PM
In addition to your password, you will need to insure that your virus protection is up-to-date. Sheesh! McAfee and Symantec will have a whole new market. :barf:

No computer guns for me.

DKSuddeth
June 27, 2006, 05:08 PM
why don't they just go all out and make it mandatory to have all firearms voice activated and only fire upon the registered owner going 'BANG!!!'

pdowg881
June 27, 2006, 05:18 PM
lol. I can imagine everyone at the range yelling BANG BANG BANG!

Happy
June 28, 2006, 01:48 PM
I can't even imagine how much this will add to the cost of the ammunition and the gun itself. Depending on how much energy is required to ignite the primer, this will likely drain a set of AAs very quickly. Interestingly, this would point towards a purely electrical trigger, which would make it childs play to modify into something not legal.

I agree with the statement this is a solution looking for a problem. Very similar to this: http://www.sawstop.com/ If I recall correctly, they were (and possibly still are) trying to make their product required by law. (It's for your own safety don't you know.) I don't mind the option and for some people, it may be preferable. My father managed to cut his thumb off with a table saw, but I don't think requiring a safety feature that will effect the performance of the product is a good way of doing it.

pdowg881
June 28, 2006, 02:01 PM
My paintball gun has an electronic trigger, and modifying trigger tension makes it easy to fire 25 balls per second with a little trigger practice. I'm not sure how that translates to firearms, but it would be easier to modify that a mechanical trigger.

Ironbarr
June 28, 2006, 03:04 PM
http://www.vnunet.com/vnunet/news/2159268/boffins-fire-password-protected

Sheldon J
June 28, 2006, 10:57 PM
the tech will be ready about the time my Phaser is ready, can you say idea stolen from "Judge Dread":evil:

GrammatonCleric
June 29, 2006, 04:17 AM
This guy is absolutely clueless. On the evolutionary scale of intelligence, I place him just below your garden-variety earthworm.:p

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