Do you keep a rifle for home defense?


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DMK
June 28, 2006, 08:29 PM
Just curious about how many of us keep a rifle over a shotgun or handgun for home defense. I'm not talking about SHTF, Red Dawn invasion or anything like that. Just the glass breaking in the middle of the night kind of thing.

Tell us about what you use.

I have a few handguns and a shotgun readily available, but I have a ready AR carbine loaded with a tac light and red dot as my primary HD weapon. With 75gr OTM, I have a lot more faith in this than a handgun and it's a lot lighter, handier and more manueverable than a shotgun.

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Black Snowman
June 28, 2006, 08:37 PM
My handy gun is a Mossy 500 with a Streamlight M3. My eyes ain't so good so without my glasses and it's easy to sight down the barrel and throws up quickly. If I feel I have to clear the house, I have my M17S bullpup that gets around tight spaces easier and any of a number of handguns for backup. Only one with a round in the chamber and handy is the shotgun.

http://www.blacksnowman.com/img/Guns/MyGuns/HD2005.jpg

Tsonda
June 28, 2006, 08:53 PM
Sorry but the poll did not fit me.

James

45Guy
June 28, 2006, 09:10 PM
Keep the AR with loaded mag, empty chamber. Keep 870 with shells onboard but not loaded, 26" is too long for HD. M-1 Carbine with 27 HSP's loaded.

RNB65
June 28, 2006, 09:10 PM
Sort of a combination. I keep a loaded XD40 and a spare mag next to the bed. In the gun cabinet, I keep an 870 loaded with 6rds 00Buck and an empty AR15 with two full 30rd mags on a shelf next to it.

MTMilitiaman
June 28, 2006, 09:11 PM
I am sure there will be a good crowd here wanting an "all of the above" option. My 870 has a 26 in barrel so it isn't really set up for that sort of thing. At any rate, I have a Glock 20 and two 15 round mags of 180 gr Gold Dots to get me two steps across the room, then I got a Rommie AK with a red dot and two 30 round magazines loaded with 122 gr JHPs. I'll take a rifle over a shotgun for just about anything any day of the week and twice on Sundays.

DMK
June 28, 2006, 09:43 PM
I am sure there will be a good crowd here wanting an "all of the above" option. Yea, I purposely did not make it a multi select. I'm an all of the above too, but really, at o' dark thirty when you are suddenly awakened by something that goes bump in the night, you are probably only going to grab one of the nearest ones.

DMK
June 28, 2006, 09:45 PM
Sorry but the poll did not fit me. :confused: What did I leave out? Do you keep a crossbow? ;)

gaven
June 28, 2006, 09:51 PM
I KEEP A MOD. 1917 S&W 45 D.A. CUT DOWN TO A SNUB NOSE . I KEEP IT RIGHT NEXT TO THE BED WHERE ALL I HAVE TO DO IS GRT ONE HAND ON IT.

Otherguy Overby
June 28, 2006, 09:56 PM
Sheesh, where is all of the above?

Wot good is an empty gun? :)

I keep a D model sks in the bedroom with a 30 round AK magazine along with an 1894 Marln in 44 mag. Their's also either a 20 gauge 870 with a 9 round Choate extension or an 870 marine magnum. For pistols, at the very least, I'll have my carry gun on a shelf on the headboard.

If I had class three weapons, they'd be sleeping with me, too. :what:

MudPuppy
June 28, 2006, 10:00 PM
+1 on the "all of the above".

No crossbow, though.

Oh yeah, I keep the dog loaded as well. "Pin 'em, Muddy! Hold 'em still!"

The_Shootist
June 28, 2006, 10:11 PM
...technically I do as my Ak is on a chair at the foot of my bed with a 30 rounder ready to rock and roll.

Realistically, I'd likely grab my SP 101 (with the night bead and FBI loads in it) on my bedside table if it sounded like I was facing an uninvited guest.

Although I would speculate that the crisp sound of an AK bolt going back chambering a round in the darkness might even give the Wolf Man pause :evil:

mustanger98
June 28, 2006, 10:16 PM
Poll didn't really fit me that well either.

If at some point I feel like I need more handy than my .45caliber sidearm, I'll have my Winchester '94AE carbine in .45Colt loaded with HP's. That 16" barrel's pretty handy and it holds 9 +1.

And don't give me the business about a levergun vs. an AR-15. I already know that arguement and AR's still don't suit me.

nitesite
June 28, 2006, 10:16 PM
I answered YES to rifle even though there is also a handgun and shotgun nearby. If something is beyond the walls of my home the rifle is my "go-to" defensive firearm.

The-Fly
June 28, 2006, 10:18 PM
all of the above.

Night stand has glock 26 (my carry gun) loaded. Next to night stand is my 870 loaded with 00 buck. In my closet (15 feet away), i have one of my AR's in a tactical bag that holds 3 loaded mags.

taliv
June 28, 2006, 10:22 PM
after the day i've had... i might get loaded myself tonight! although that prob won't be a very effective HD strategy

KIMBER45TLE
June 28, 2006, 10:22 PM
Depends on which side of the bed I'm on. Starboard side I keep a Norinco Mod 99 coach gun, rabbit ears and all, in 12 gauge with 3" mag Turkey loads. Port side there is a 1911 with two extra mags. Course, you have to get by 84 pounds of dog first.:D

Chris Rhines
June 28, 2006, 10:23 PM
My house gun is a 16" lightweight AR-15A3 carbine, built up from a mix of Colt and Bushmaster parts, with a LaRue Battlelight and a 30mm UltraDot. Ammo is 77grn. Black Hills Mk262, 28 rounds in the gun, 28 in a spare magazine in a buttstock pouch.

If/when I have the available cash, I'd build up a similar AR-15, but with a 10.5" barrel and a suppressor.

- Chris

Gunslinger686
June 28, 2006, 10:24 PM
If thay get pass stumpy

http://im1.shutterfly.com/procserv/47b5db34b3127cce91f64d596cec00000015108Scsmrdo0M


then the 870 get's a turn:what:

dev_null
June 28, 2006, 10:24 PM
Since there was no option for more than one, I didn't vote.

rbernie
June 28, 2006, 10:26 PM
Small children in the house = electronic cypher-lock style handgun safes sprinkled about with pistols in 'em. If they made 'em in rifle sizes, I'd buy those and move to a long gun for HD.

But no unsecured long weapons, thankyouverymuch. Not until the kids get a wee bit older.

nero45acp
June 28, 2006, 10:47 PM
M1 Carbine (loaded with Winchester 110gr Super-X Hollow Soft Points) on top of my dresser, FN BDAO (DAO Hi-Power) in a cigar box on my nightstand. S&W 432PD (my CCW) in a cigar box next to my computer when I'm not carrying it. S&W 640 & extra speedloader locked in my glovebox in my car.


nero

Terrierman
June 28, 2006, 11:02 PM
Really it's all of the above, S&W Models 60 and 686 are handy, both loaded with .38 special +P Hydrashok. An 870 loaded with # 1 buck is in the closet. The 870 is the one I would go to. The other option is a 760 .30-06, but it's not the 1st choice for indoors. There's also a .22 mag in the closet and it gets more HD use than anything else as the primary form of trespasser requiring an armed response has thus far been armadillo....Coyotes sound like a threat at times especially with our kennelled dogs, but have yet to be offered a shot at one from the house. The neighbors seem to be pretty well behaved so we haven't had to shoot any of them yet either.

blackhawk2000
June 28, 2006, 11:05 PM
Where is the "all of the above" choice?

MachIVshooter
June 28, 2006, 11:41 PM
Where is the "all of the above" choice?

I was wondering the very same thing. Handguns are used in conjunction with flashlight to investigate bumps in the night. Shotguns are used when you are quite sure there is a threat and you and your family are secure. Rifles have there place in the more dire instance of multiple threats, possibly armored.

Personally, if I am sure someone is in the house, I will get me and the wife behind the bed with my AR-10 in front of me. She'll probably still be armed with her S&W 4006. The AR has a surefire 660 below the barrel to positively ID a threat and is loaded with a mixed bag in a custom 30 round mag; suffice to say there is nothing one can wear that would protect them if I have that rifle ready.

Of course, they first must get past Romeo. If I hear him yelp in pain, I'll just start poking holes in the walls about 4' up.

MachIVshooter
June 28, 2006, 11:50 PM
Wot good is an empty gun?

I would agree if we were talking handguns, but long guns should never be stored with a round in the chamber. Long guns do not generally have passive safeties and can discharge with a good jolt, such as falling over in the corner. Unlikely as it may be, it's a chance no one should take. If you have time to get to your long gun, you have time to rack the slide/bolt.

Terrierman
June 29, 2006, 08:30 AM
I agree. To me, a loaded magazine in the weapon makes it a loaded weapon. The chamber is empty on all my long guns for safety considerations until ready for imminent use.

Gary G23
June 29, 2006, 08:49 AM
LMT M4 with 14.5" barrel. EOTech 552. Pentagon weaponlight. C Products LLC 30rd stainless steel mags loaded with Hornady TAP 75gr.

geekWithA.45
June 29, 2006, 09:36 AM
With all the tykes running around the house, a long gun is problematic to keep both secure and ready, therefore the handguns distributed about the house in quick access safes are the fastest to get to.

Handguns can come into play in seconds. I can get the long guns into play with a minute's warning.

GreyMauser
June 29, 2006, 02:20 PM
In a condo/apt environment, a 32 H&R mag revolver with frangible loads makes sense to me. With a blinding Surefire for the other hand. I want to take out only the intruder, not my neighbors too.

Freddymac
June 29, 2006, 02:29 PM
cocked, locked, & ready to rock

C-grunt
June 29, 2006, 03:23 PM
My main gun would be my G23 loaded with 180grn HST's. If I was sure someone was there I might grab the Mossin M38, but being a bolt gun, that might not be the best option.Though Im pretty sure that a BG hit COM with a 7.62x54 isnt going to fight much.

MTMilitiaman
June 29, 2006, 03:32 PM
I would agree if we were talking handguns, but long guns should never be stored with a round in the chamber. Long guns do not generally have passive safeties and can discharge with a good jolt, such as falling over in the corner. Unlikely as it may be, it's a chance no one should take. If you have time to get to your long gun, you have time to rack the slide/bolt.

I adamentally disagree. A rifle's safety shouldn't be relied on anymore than a pistol's. My family keeps every rifle, shotgun, and handgun we own loaded for as long as we have ammo for it. All of our rifles have taken jars and jolts, have fallen or tipped over when stored or in use, and we've never had one go off without pulling the trigger. Just like I don't take the head off a hammer before I put it away, I think it is ridiculous to assume a firearm should be unloaded before being stored.

Additionally, I am not going to give up the element of surprise by acknowleding my position and that I am armed by chambering a round when there is already a hostile prescence in my domicile. Waiting until someone could be around the next corner to load your weapon sounds foolish to me, but maybe my family just does things differently.

taliv
June 29, 2006, 03:57 PM
loaded, but not with a round in the chamber. for ar15s (my HD choice) i never, ever put a round in the chamber in the house because of the possibility of a slamfire.

ArmedBear
June 29, 2006, 04:02 PM
I can't decide between a big Weatherby and a big Mauser, so I have to go with a handgun and/or a shotgun instead, particularly in the city.:p

420Stainless
June 29, 2006, 09:41 PM
20 GA. for me. I wouldn't feel too bad if I had a lever carbine or a mini 14 or something else of similar dimension and weight.

The_Shootist
June 29, 2006, 10:06 PM
You hide all the mirrors in the house when Stumpy comes out, don't you? :neener:

B Easy
June 29, 2006, 10:22 PM
AR15 with a light under the bed, AK in the basement in case I just got back from the gym or otherwise don't have my carry piece on me.

Handgun is usually on me at all times, except when I'm in gym clothes.

With the rifles I don't keep one in the chamber.

KingAirDriver
June 29, 2006, 10:38 PM
I keep my XD-9SC and extra mag on the nightstand, and have my Beretta 96 in a holster hanging next to the bed as well (extra mag for it in the nightstand). I don't have a tac light for my XD yet :( , but I keep a flashlight by the bed too. If I ever hear someone come in, I'll take my XD out with me, and wifey will hang on to the Beretta. I don't have any hollow points YET for the Beretta (money's been THAT tight lately), which is why I'd want my wife to have it...less chance of her shooting it, I hope. I don't want the rounds going through all sorts of walls (I'm in an apartment).

Oh, and here's our first line of defense- our little Chihuahua. :D Her name really is Chalupa, too!
http://i4.photobucket.com/albums/y126/CaravanMan/DSC00012-1.jpg

PAC 762
June 29, 2006, 10:49 PM
For home defense, I keep a 1911 with a loaded mag between the matress and box spring, along with a mossberg 500 w/ surefie under the bed (mag loaded w/ 00 buck). I also have several 1911's and .44 mag revolvers loaded in various parts of the house. All my rifles are in my basement. All semiautos have loaded mags in them, the bolt actions are left unlaoded, since I would never pick one up as a first line of defense. The only guns that have loaded chambers consistantly are a keltec p32 and a kimber procarry that I carry on a regular basis.... no kiddies in my house.

Foxtrot427
June 29, 2006, 10:52 PM
Nice M17s! A bullpup is probably the best HD rifle

Chris Rhines
June 29, 2006, 10:54 PM
A bullpup is probably the best HD rifle The only people I know of who are big fans of bullpup rifles are people who have never used one under pressure.

- Chris

MachIVshooter
June 29, 2006, 11:40 PM
A rifle's safety shouldn't be relied on anymore than a pistol's

I agree with that as far as safe handling goes, but the lockwork on a long gun is designed in such a fashion that the release of the sear means a discharge, regardless of how it was released. Many rifles do not even have a fring pin spring, so the sear need not even be released to discharge. Nearly all handguns made in the last half-century have a passive safety that prevents them from discharging unless the trigger is pulled. Revolvers have transfer bars or hammer stops, 1911's have grip safeties and sometimes firing pin blocks, virtually all other auto's have either a firing pin block or a striker that is incapable of striking the primer without a trigger pull.

My family keeps every rifle, shotgun, and handgun we own loaded for as long as we have ammo for it. All of our rifles have taken jars and jolts, have fallen or tipped over when stored or in use, and we've never had one go off without pulling the trigger

And I've never had my house burn down because I left the stove or coffee pot on. Does that mean it can't happen? I'd rather not tempt disaster.

sm
June 30, 2006, 12:17 AM
No.

Depends. :D

I was PM-ed about this thread as it relates to a member I am assisting off forum.

My concerns have always been getting into a structure, leaving a structure and answering the door.
I have always carried a Handgun Concealed.

I have a lot of trigger time on shotguns, my travels included taking in a Shotgun in my Garmet bag to hotel/motels/ Guest houses/ condo's and Apts (Corp and Private).

In some settings I use a Lever Action 30-30, I kept these in homes, businesses, and these were often part of the places I stayed. I have been known to also have in that garmet bag a Lever Action 30-30 along with the Shotgun.

Some "Corporate Housing" was in fact Rural, and in Addition My other favorite is the Model 70 in '06.

As the man said "handgun to get to the long gun".

Right this minute with the setting I am in. I am CCW-ing 2 handguns, 1 more is handy, and the long gun is a single shot youth model 20 ga with slugs.

Why? I gotta get into this place, leave and sometimes answer the door. Furniture is arranged such for "shooting lanes" and cover for me. Lighting is to MY advantage. Home invasion situation? Going to be Close quarters here, and taking cover best can while the Calvary gets here is going to be dicy.

My plan is "southern reload" - I am changing handguns instead of reloading.

The shotgun is for holding anyone at bay while I dial the phone again if need...
Or to go thru something to get to them if I have to. Hence the slugs only .

The place I house sit some times? Again handgun first, shotgun second an d lever action 30-30.
I also know where the steel plates are as well as cement block I can use for cover, and the BGs don't. Depending on where I am and "they" are - I got backstops. Oh there I use a .44 magnum for first gun before "Southern reload".
:)

I check out each situation and decide accordingly...still I always have a handgun , and with the trigger time on a shotgun...

The_Shootist
June 30, 2006, 12:29 AM
I Thought it was a "New York reload"?:)

MTMilitiaman
June 30, 2006, 02:12 AM
We're not running with scissors here. We're talking about leaving an inanimate object in a corner until you need it. I know full well that a rifle can go off without having its trigger pulled. My brother had his M249 get bumped off a bench in a guard tower and it put three rounds through the wall. Fair enough. You have a point there. It can happen, but it isn't very likely. So unlikely that in my book it is more risky having an unloaded weapon when you need a loaded one. I'd rather explain a hole in the wall than deal with the potential risks of being mid-way through chambering a round when the bad guy shows up in my doorway with a 12 gauge.
When something goes bump in the night and your heart starts beating out of your chest, you're going to have enough things to worry about. In terms of controls, I already have to remember to switch the safety off and the red dot sight on as well as remember where all the friendlies are located. I know I have to identify my target. The bad guy doesn't. Home field advantage and teh element of surprise may be all I have. I am determined to maintain and employ these advantages as best I can.
And again, just like I am opposed to the school of thought dictating that racking the slide of a shotgun may scare off an intruder, I don't buy it with a rifle either. If someone is going to run away at the sound of a round being chambered, they probably aren't going to put up much of a fight when they are looking down the barrel. I am more worried about the more scarce and dangerous type that come looking for a fight.
When a bad guy breaks into your house, he's got more questions than answers. He doesn't know if his intrusion has awaken the residents or if his presence has been detected. He might not know which rooms are occupied or which occupants are armed. When you chamber a round, it lets him know the answers, at least in part, to all of these questions. In addition, it gives him an general idea of what he is up against and where you are located. You have no such information about your opponent, so you have really just turned the information battle in their favor, in addition to giving away the element of surprise. This seems to me like an awful lot of risk to take when weighed against the chances a rifle will be bumped and impact at such a force and angle as necessary to cause it to discharge. It's not worth it for me to set a rifle aside for defense then handicap it in this role by not keeping it in the condition it will be deployed in. That is why I keep my rifles as loaded as my handguns.

toivo
June 30, 2006, 03:03 AM
I think if you posted this in the Shotguns forum the results would be a little different...

DMK
June 30, 2006, 08:10 PM
My concerns have always been getting into a structure, leaving a structure and answering the door.
I have always carried a Handgun Concealed. Good points. I would consider those CCW situations. They are public situations, leaving your home to go out in the public, returning from same (although perhaps good use for a "truck gun"). Answering the doorbell even at 3am calls for concealment of your firearm so you don't freak the person out. Obviously those of us with a Concealed Carry Permit carry handguns on our persons in public, not rifles. A CCW is a very compromised weapon due to the necessity of discretion. A HD weapon does not always have that limitation.

However, home defense may include dissagreeable behaviours by individuals, such as someone sneaking around your property at night or obviously breaking in while you are home. It may even be defense from an animal attacking a loved one in your yard. Scenarious where you are "safe at home" with anything you own at your disposal and things suddenly go very, very bad.

Sure I have pistols and shotguns but You can't defend yourself with an armful of weapons. You need to make a choice and prepare with that choice, plans B and C come later in case of Murphy. If somebody was knocking on my door, I'd have a 1911 stuck in my belt, not a rifle but I'd pick up my AR15 in any situation that did not call for concealment.

Marshall
June 30, 2006, 08:53 PM
Shotgun and handgun are always ready. I guess I could use one of my rifles but I see no need.

I imagine you would get different results posting this on different forums.

blackhawk2000
June 30, 2006, 09:39 PM
If somebody is knocking on the door at 3 A.M. I'm answering it with my AR slung up for sure. I don't care who it is. If they have half a brain, they will understand.

nitesite
June 30, 2006, 10:07 PM
I voted YES to a rifle without giving a rational explaination.

I have had my dogs look for a place to crap 150' from my house when coyotes in the high grass popped their heads up and wanted some munchies. :(

That's why I have kept a rifle close by.

There are 600'-1800' all around my home that is just wide open spaces. So a shotgun will not have the necessary range for four-legged predators that could harm my expensive dogs that are visiting the yard to take a piss.

A scoped Ruger M77 MK II .243 and an AR15 are kept loaded and close.

Inside the house there are several powerful handguns and a 590 8+1 with ghost rings for more personal encounters.

Farnham
June 30, 2006, 10:17 PM
Mossberg 500 next to the bed with a Surefire in a "redneck special" mount.

What has twelve legs, twelve fangs, and a dislike for strangers? My living room! :neener:

S/F

Farnham

Rabbi
June 30, 2006, 10:36 PM
AK with 30 and 40 round mags of Barnaul softball.

If they get by the 13 rounds of 230 grain .45 Hydra-Shoks, that is.

And the dog.

And the ol' lady's .357 SWC-HP at 1500 f.p.s.

And heightened awareness.

And maybe a 911 call to the fuzz.

Oh yeah, and 12 gauge buckshots from S&B (hot 12 pellet double oughts).

The buckshot and Barnauls are likely redundant.

Tsonda
June 30, 2006, 11:27 PM
But I keep at least one of each at the bedside. I live in a very peacful community, but I am always ready for a 3 gun match to break out in the living room. Besides this is Texas and I should have my choice right? I do not have a crossbow. Have you found the hole in my defenses? Darn it now I have to buy a crossbow.:)

I do however consider an AR to be the go to gun for now. Sometimes it is an FAL.

James

Tsonda
June 30, 2006, 11:35 PM
But I consider a long gun no more dangerous than a sidearm. I consider all to be loaded. I have always kept both loaded. I think some members are not basing their HD weapons on facts.

Best regards,

James

MTMilitiaman
June 30, 2006, 11:48 PM
If somebody is knocking on the door at 3 A.M. I'm answering it with my AR slung up for sure. I don't care who it is. If they have half a brain, they will understand.

I might be inclined to agree except you don't have my brother. During the late spring and early summer when I come home to live with my parents and work between semesters, it could get interesting. My brother got smashed at his senior prom. The doors were locked so he tried to crawl through my window--at 3 in the morning. I woke up to whispering outside my window and when it slid open and his head poked into my room he was looking down the barrel of a .45. Both of our eyes got really big when we realized what we were looking at. While I would appreciate advanced notice and more conventional means of entry (knocking at the door), brothers and friends are always welcome under my roof. I just can't know for sure that crashing sound in the living room isn't my brother knocking over a lamp trying to find the sofa.

UnintendedConsequences
July 1, 2006, 07:23 AM
The answer to this question for me can only be based on my family situation and my location, others have based theirs on their own personal circumstances. Personally, I don't leave a round in the chamber of anything but my .22 Long Rifle rimfire rifles and revolver because if a fox or smaller predator attacks my small to medium sized livestock at night it is all I can do to get them out of the case and the scope covers off.

As for centerfire chambered items, All have full magazines but empty chambers because they won't be used as frequently as the rimfires and I don't want the cartridge and shell brass to corrode in the chambers because of the high humidity here during spring, summer and fall here. This is despite having a dehumidifier running 24/7. I have early warning systems in more than one species and the sound of a vehicle coming up my long, rough driveway will wake me up so that I can quickly chamber a round. Just in case, I also keep the bayonets for the long arms with them in case they need to be affixed to the lug. The only centerfire I don't keep with a loaded magazine is my M-1 Garand for the simple fact that you cannot close the bolt on an en bloc and not have it chamber a round. That's fine for combat when you need fast reloads to get back into the fight, but not for a standby arm.

Cartridges are in the .308 to .310/.312 bullet diameter range and with a buffet of 12 gauge fodder. If I have to fire my rifle or shotgun, it has to be splatted good with the first few rounds if not the first one. I don't mess with squeaker spankers because I don't have confidence in their ability to do the job against all the four and two legged vermin that might come across my path here. Action type includes all but lever action, break action and single shot, for now.

My short answer would be, multiples of all three plus bladed weapons too.

Fosbery
July 1, 2006, 08:43 AM
Marlin 1894 in .375 magnum at the ready to search the house, go outside with. Remington M1100 kept handy if I need to defend a room (it's got a 9 round magazine, so is a little big for clearing the house etc).

ugaarguy
July 1, 2006, 03:55 PM
The only people I know of who are big fans of bullpup rifles are people who have never used one under pressure.

- Chris

I suppose time will tell since the newly developed Iraeli main battle rifle is a bullpup. Urban combat with the IDF will be a great make or break verdict on the bullpup's future as a primary arm.

Dr.Rob
July 1, 2006, 06:04 PM
Before I could afford more, for a while my ONLY option was a Marlin 995 rifle in .22 cal loaded with CCI Stingers. I'd leave the magazine loaded with the bolt closed... to use it I'd have to cycle the bolt.

If it's ALL you have, a 22 fired from a rifle is better than harsh language.

I much prefer a shotgun. In 12 ga.

Stiletto Null
July 1, 2006, 07:36 PM
Well, I'm back to a lone Mauser.

Lots of stopping power alright, but it's long and it'll shoot through schools.

DMK
July 1, 2006, 10:56 PM
Sorry DMK
But I keep at least one of each at the bedside. I live in a very peacful community, but I am always ready for a 3 gun match to break out in the living room. Besides this is Texas and I should have my choice right? I do not have a crossbow. Have you found the hole in my defenses? Darn it now I have to buy a crossbow.LOL at imagry of a three gun match in the living room.

Before I actually watched one, I sort of wondered how they would run though the match carrying two long arms. :p

GarandOwner
July 1, 2006, 11:21 PM
My family keeps every rifle, shotgun, and handgun we own loaded for as long as we have ammo for it.:what:
...Remind me NEVER to visit your house!! I can see if you keep a home defense weapon, but I think it unwise to keep every weapon you own loaded. In my mind that is just begging accident. I keep a loaded 1911 in the nightstand. Rifles are WAY to overpowered to use for home defense (I can see about using a rifle in rural places where intruders are outdoors, and not human in nature, like coyotes or foxes on a farm. But here in the suburbs, well the neighbors dont generally take well to having a .30 cal slug going through their house.) ;) too many times people forget about #4! "Know your target and whats behind it" most rifle caliber rounds can go through the walls of your house, and out the other side. It can even go into your neighbors house depending on how close/how many walls it has to penetrate.

taliv
July 2, 2006, 12:25 AM
garandowner, i think the theory there is about rule #1, all guns are always loaded. so if you actually keep your guns loaded, you won't ever be tempted to treat them with less respect than they deserve, thinking they aren't actually loaded.

in other words, keeping your guns loaded could result in fewer accidents

Stiletto Null
July 2, 2006, 12:39 AM
Consistency is the important factor, I'd think.

I keep non-ready guns unloaded and opened.

DMK
July 2, 2006, 12:54 AM
most rifle caliber rounds can go through the walls of your house, and out the other side. It can even go into your neighbors house depending on how close/how many walls it has to penetrate.Pistol rounds and buckshot can do that too.

http://www.theboxotruth.com/

Sheetrock and plywood do very little to stop errant rounds.

GarandOwner
July 2, 2006, 02:12 AM
i think the theory there is about rule #1, all guns are always loaded. so if you actually keep your guns loaded, you won't ever be tempted to treat them with less respect than they deserve, thinking they aren't actually loaded.in other words, keeping your guns loaded could result in fewer accidents
Not exactly. While the owner might know and practice safe gun handling the danger would come from a visitor who might not know any better (might be of young age). That is where the accident may lye.
Pistol rounds and buckshot can do that too.

Yes but they tend to have less penetration than most rifle calibers.

Im not trying to be arguementitive, just defending my opinion:neener:

Vairochana
July 2, 2006, 06:05 AM
Double barrel shotgun in the bedroom safe with slugs and OO handy- I have an 87 lever action on order as a bedroom gun after an encounter with a BG with a knife in my yard the other night.
For outside my .22 sees off the evil Indian Mynas:uhoh:

Fosbery
July 2, 2006, 06:26 AM
First, I'm a fan of bullpup rifles. Well, not all bullpup rifles, but the two I've used extensively: the L85 and the AUG. Now I've never used the AUG 'under pressure' unless you count practical rifle etc, but the L85 handled fine in combat. I'd rather spent 2 milliseconds longer on a magazine change but have twice the barrel length to be honest. Both the AUG and the L85 are the most natural pointing and easy to shoot rifles I've ever used.

Second, I keep two of my guns loaded, the rest unloaded. The two I keep loaded, I reload everyday. Leaving rounds sitting in magazines lets them settle and become more comfortable so to speak. This can cause feeding problems, so if you do keep guns loaded, remember to reload the magazine or at least give it a good smack every evening (no need to hit it on a helmet like in the movies, the flat of your hand works just fine :rolleyes: ).

taliv
July 2, 2006, 09:44 AM
The two I keep loaded, I reload everyday. Leaving rounds sitting in magazines lets them settle and become more comfortable so to speak. This can cause feeding problems, so if you do keep guns loaded, remember to reload the magazine or at least give it a good smack every evening

in all the thousands of threads and posts on this subject I've read, I've never ever heard that before. I can't say it makes any sense, either. Normally, the question is "does it hurt your springs to leave the mags loaded" and the answer I assume you know is that "no, compression doesn't hurt them, it's the compression/decompression cycle that wears out springs".

in other words, what you're suggesting will weaken your springs over time, whereas leaving them loaded for 20 yrs without touching them will not.

what really gets me is your "settling" comment. please explain what you mean. your post seems to contradict itself, as what better way to settle the rounds than smacking them every day?

Stiletto Null
July 2, 2006, 09:48 AM
Hey Fosbery, are you still active .mil, or one of those rare "collector" types?

Fosbery
July 2, 2006, 11:23 AM
I am no longer in the military, but I still shoot as a civillian. In the military we were taught to slap magazine on our rifles, but as a civillian I just use a table edge or my leg when using box mags, and with internal magazines on shotguns and leverguns I just reload them.

When the magazine has been sat still for a long time, everything achieves a happy status, sometimes this isnt the best way for things to be. Smacking the mag makes all the internals move, so that any rounds that are slightly twisted will jump back under the pressure from the spring into the correct position for feeding, thus preventing stoppages.

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