Hunting Rifle Accuracy: Glass Bedding, Pressure Point


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frednaz
June 29, 2006, 03:00 PM
I have taken some advice I received some time ago on this forum about having my Ruger Mk II glass bedded. It has improved the accuracy. The trigger was smoothed and stoned to a 3 1/2 pound pull. The rifle now shoots an honest 1 inch @ 100 yards. I'm still working on reloads, however.

The real question I have is this: The gunsmith convinced me to leave a "pressure point" in the stock about and inch or so from the end of the foreend. So, the barrel is free floated to near the end with this "pressure point." I'm not sure I like this and have no experience with this over simply free-floating the barrel completely. Now, the only way I can tell if improvement could be had is to sand out the "pressure point."

What is your experience with glass bedding and completely free floated barrels vs this idea of this pressure point near the end ? Any advice welcome.
Thanks! Fred

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Art Eatman
June 29, 2006, 03:22 PM
My gunsmith uncle told me to free float and then shim at the forearm tip. I make a shim from a long strip of wax paper, folding it back and forth until it takes about a five-pound pull to allow insertion.

My uncle's theory was that the shim dampened the vibrations of the spring that a barrel acts like when the rifle is fired. It's much like what a shock absorber does for a car's suspension. This dampening creates uniformity from shot to shot.

This subject came up at TFL some years back. Gale McMillan concurred, with the caveat that it should be unnecessary for his version of a "perfect barrel".

Anyhow, the pressure point should bear lightly against the barrel. And, it's easy enough to sand it out and compare groups; add a shim if necessary. No big deal.

Somebody makes a nylon insert that can be put into the forearm and adjusted with a screwdriver, to give a minimum amount of pressure.

I've done this wax paper thing on some dozen or fifteen rifles, through the years. There has pretty much always been an improvement in reducing group size.

Art

Vern Humphrey
June 29, 2006, 03:30 PM
There's an old saying, "Don't fix it if it ain't broke."

An honest minute-of-angle rifle isn't as easy to come by as some would have you think. I wouldn't meddle with the bedding.

frednaz
June 29, 2006, 03:44 PM
Thank you for your quick responses. Your advise, Vern, sounds like my late father-in-law, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it."

I like this rifle a lot. It has a great "feel" to me, if you know what I mean. It is a .308 that I've decided more or less to shoot 165 grain loads with and not try to outblaze or outblast the manuals with hot loads. I'm just looking for an accurate hunting load for deer in PA, and mule deer out west. It seems to shoot better and better with each outing. I think, for the time being, I will just continue to experiment with loads and bullet seating depth. It seems to like Nosler BT's and Hornady's interlock. I like the interlock as a hunting bullet.

Thanks! Fred

Vern Humphrey
June 29, 2006, 03:50 PM
It is a .308 that I've decided more or less to shoot 165 grain loads with and not try to outblaze or outblast the manuals with hot loads. I'm just looking for an accurate hunting load for deer in PA, and mule deer out west.

I think it's just what the doctor ordered. A 165 grain bullet is the best balance between SD and velocity in the .308. I like a premium bullet when I hunt in the west -- just for extra insurance -- but a 165 grain Nosler PJ or equivallent would take mulies and elk nicely.

frednaz
June 29, 2006, 04:23 PM
Vern,
I don't own many centerfires, as I live in Ohio, but I:) :) like to shoot and hunt deer mainly in Pa, and some in W Va. I've just not gotten around to doing much with this .308 because I have such a liking for a Remington Mtn Rifle in 7mm-08.
I did take a deer last season in PA with the .308 and it worked to perfection. Pouring down rain and the worst weather I've ever hunted in, but we were fortunate, or "dumb enough" to keep slowly moving through the woods and took three deer in a mile or so sweep between 4 guys. There are some rewards for persistence, and funny, no other hunters within miles.
The 7mm-08 rarely gives me a "bang flop" dead deer, but they just walk about 10 yards and die.

Fred

Vern Humphrey
June 29, 2006, 04:50 PM
Some of the best, most dedicated deer hunters I know like to hunt in the rain, so I'm not surprised.

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