A-Bolt triggers?


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fal308
January 4, 2003, 09:53 AM
Who makes an aftermarket A-Bolt trigger? Jewell only has the spring kit. I've only found a company named Moyer that makes an aftermerket trigger but have never heard of them, though Brownells sells them.
Also are there any sites that detail adjusting the factory trigger?

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Clint
January 4, 2003, 10:09 AM
I have a Ruger #1V that I installed a Moyer trigger in, they are very good triggers, I have mine set for 3lbs. My #1V is my best shooting rifle.

cdbeaver
January 4, 2003, 10:33 AM
I also bought a Moyer trigger (direct) for My Ruger 1V. Had a local gunsmith install and tune it, and it made a tremendous difference in trigger pull. In my estimation, a very worthwhile after-market purchase for the No. 1.

rugerfreak
January 4, 2003, 11:47 AM
The owners manual tells you how to adjust it-----thinking the Browning web site might have info too. No need to buy aftermarket stuff for your Browning.

Both my A-Bolts are down to 3lbs---plenty good for a hunting rifle.

BrianW
January 4, 2003, 02:53 PM
I have to disagree with rugerfreak: i tried, using a properly fitting gunsmith screwdriver, to adjust the trigger on my Abolt and tore the ears of the screw without creating any adjustment at all. Since then, I've read of the same thing happening to others.

I'm looking into aftermarket myself, altho I don't want to spend anything on that rifle.

Robert inOregon
January 4, 2003, 03:37 PM
I have to disagree with rugerfreak: i tried, using a properly fitting gunsmith screwdriver, to adjust the trigger on my Abolt and tore the ears of the screw without creating any adjustment at all. Since then, I've read of the same thing happening to others.

Just comes to show that not everyone is cut out to do smith work. :neener:

Here's a tip for those that don't have a problem breaking the factory adjustment screw. The trigger breaks clean and all the A-Bolt trigger needs is adjustment. I've done this two ways. When in a rush (want to shoot it today!) push the trigger pin out and the trigger and adjustment spring will fall out. With a trigger scale and cutting pliers start clipping small amounts of spring till your trigger hit the desired weight. Proper method is to replace the trigger spring with a softer spring till you reach your desired weight. I field my rifles and have found a happy medium at a true two pounds. There is no need to spend extra money on products you don't need.

Nero Steptoe
January 4, 2003, 06:39 PM
" Proper method is to replace the trigger spring with a softer spring till you reach your desired weight..."

Or, you could do as others have suggested and buy a trigger that's ACTUALLY an adjustable trigger, you know, with pull, creep,and overtravel adjustment screws. (Although spring clipping sounds like a pretty easy fix.)

JohnBT
January 4, 2003, 07:16 PM
I was curious, so I surfed. The manual is on the Browning USA site under Manuals. Looks like anything under 3# is going to require some work or money.

The A-Bolt II's trigger is preset at the factory. The trigger pull can be adjusted within a range of approximately 3 to 6 pounds. To adjust the trigger pull, first MAKE CERTAIN THAT THE RIFLE IS UNLOADED. Next lower the floorplate and carefully remove the trigger guard screw (See Figure 11). Lift the trigger guard out of the stock (See Figure 12).

The trigger pull adjustment screw is located at the rear of the trigger assembly (See Figure 13). To decrease the weight of the trigger pull, turn the adjustment screw in a clockwise direction, using a small screw driver. To increase the trigger pull, turn the adjustment screw in a counter clockwise direction. NOTE: If trigger pull is increased too much, the trigger cannot be pulled.

Turn the screw clockwise until the trigger can be pulled.
The trigger pull can be measured, with the bolt closed, using a very accurate spring scale or a commercially available set of trigger pull measuring weights. Most gunsmiths can also measure trigger pull for you.

When finished making the adjustment, place the trigger guard back in the stock and reinstall the trigger guard screw snugly.

John

Mr Bill
January 4, 2003, 08:14 PM
The trigger adjustment screw only adjusts the pull weight, it doesn't adjust for over travel (creep). To have the creep adjusted on the stock trigger have a competent 'smith do it for you. The 'smith fee won't be as much as an after market trigger. I've had my micro medallion set to a crisp 3# pull. After closely studying what the 'smith had done I set my stainless stalker to exactly the same setting. If your not 'skilled' don't try it yourself for it could make for a dangerous (lethal) condition.

Robert inOregon
January 4, 2003, 08:36 PM
Browning triggers have no creep from the word go and is an instant engagement of the sear. Trigger weight is all that needs to be adjusted.

fal308
January 5, 2003, 10:24 AM
Thanks everyone for the information. I'll pass along everything to my friend with the A-Bolt.

larryw
January 5, 2003, 09:41 PM
Robert, when you remove coils (or parts of coils) from springs, the effect is to stiffen the spring. I don't understand how stiffening the spring is used to lighten the A-Bolt's trigger pull. Is the A-Bolt's trigger put together something bass-ackwards?

Nero Steptoe
January 5, 2003, 09:53 PM
Don't know about the configuration of the Browning trigger, but I do know that Glock striker springs aren't as strong with coils clipped off as they are without coils clipped off. The same holds true with Rem. 700 trigger return springs.

Robert inOregon
January 6, 2003, 02:40 AM
larryw, don't know if cutting springs makes them stiff or not, but before designer springs, we cut a ton of trigger springs on S&W revolvers and they sure worked a whole lot better. Like I stated in the beginning of this thread, the proper way is to replace the spring completely with a softer one. All the trigger spring does in this case is set the trigger tension and reset the trigger after firing. Rifle will actually work without any spring at all. It will produce an 11 ounce pull. Don't think we need a discloser statement here, we are all big children and understand that 11 ounces is a no-no. And a trigger without a reset is a huge no-no. I've found comfort in a 2 pound trigger. Started by cutting (the experiment!), showed my gunsmith and he got all pissed off and gave me a pack of different springs. I spent an evening trying the different springs till I found the right one. No need to mess with any of the sears. I've been happy ever since.

dcraig4570
October 19, 2006, 01:10 AM
Well I removed some coils form my A-bolts spring and my triger is at 1.3 lb

castingdonkey
September 5, 2011, 01:44 AM
Hello folks I found this site through this thread and had to join to say thanks to Robert in Oregon. I had to go the cheap route on my trigger job but it feels great. I tried everything I could to set off the gun without touching the trigger and I couldn't get the pin to release so good news. The way Browning builds their safety it is impossible to fire the weapon if the safety is set but I tried that anyway. Thanks to all that contributed to this thread.

Strongbad
September 5, 2011, 09:30 AM
For what it is, the Moyer's trigger is an excellent little unit. It's basically nothing more than the stock trigger with a couple of extra holes drilled in it where it pivots for more adjustment i.e. overtravel, and engagement. The standard screw in the rear of the trigger is retained but you get a different screw and spring to reduce the weight of pull from the stocker. It's also very very easy to install. The one I put in a A-Bolt stainless a couple of years back has been excellent and trouble free.

sourdough44
September 6, 2011, 02:07 PM
The Timney replacement spring(medium or light) is the way to go with the A-Bolt trigger.

bgr2014
September 6, 2011, 03:24 PM
You can have a very good trigger by modifying the original. Drill and tap the back of the trigger housing in the step where the mounting screw goes, drill all the way through to the trigger and tap for a 6-32x5/8" allen head set screw. Then with the trigger pivot pin out you can back out the spring tension screw and either install a lighter spring or shorten the original 2 coils. Also grind the round end of the tension screw about half off, and polish it. This gives you more adjustment options. If you have a problem getting the safety to work properly, take the screw that goes through the trigger and acts as the safety pin, chuck it in a drill and file it down a little at a time until the safety works. Be sure to put some thread locker in the new screw. I've done a lot of them and they work great.

herb40
September 6, 2011, 08:28 PM
Get the Timmey replacement spring before you do anything else, I guarantee you will be happy with the result.

SwampWolf
September 7, 2011, 08:20 PM
I guess I'm just lucky: my A-bolt trigger was fine right out of the box.

castingdonkey
September 8, 2011, 12:18 AM
My rifle is a euro-bolt and it is said in the maual to have a set trigger that allows you to have an 11 ounce trigger. For whatever reason my rifle has the same trigger as an A-bolt. I cut exactly 2 coils off the spring and the trigger feels much better but for some reason I am all over the place at 100. I am going to read as many forums on this as I can before asking questions. But on another note I am shooting the same horrible groups with my handloads that I was with factory rounds when I first bought it. So I belive I just need to relax and I'll get back to 5/8 groups again.

bgr2014
September 8, 2011, 09:24 AM
Have a chamber cast made, I re-barreled a new one because all of the rifling did not come back to the free bore evenly. It shot just the way you are describing yours does. The lighter the bullet the worse it shot. With a chamber cast you will be able to see if that is the case. If so Browning will change it out for you.

castingdonkey
September 10, 2011, 09:53 PM
I will check that out, Thank you.

castingdonkey
September 18, 2011, 01:46 PM
Turned out my rifle was coming apart at the seams. The screws were nearly all the way out of my rear scope mount and the stock was very loose. I am pretty sure the issue was more so the scope mount. 2-3shot groups at 100 were great, one could be covered with a nickel and the other with a penny. Thanks to a good buddy with a lot more knowledge and a torque wrench I'm back in the game.

rori
September 18, 2011, 02:40 PM
I put a Timney trigger in mine and it is great now. It really wasn't all that bad from the factory but I have got to screw with everything mechanical that I own. Frank

Raingull
November 5, 2011, 07:46 PM
For the record I wouldn't recommend grinding down the trigger pull adjusting screw, especially with the stock spring as it wont fit through the bore and the screw already bottoms out even or below the bore. There are much better ways of working with this trigger.http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t61/PitchfireNSwissMiss/postreduced.jpg

Something that does a lot for the A-bolt II trigger is putting a washer (4.5mm outside diameter, 2.5mm inside diameter) between the trigger and spring and replacing the spring with something that fits better (the factory spring is too long and too wide).http://i157.photobucket.com/albums/t61/PitchfireNSwissMiss/washersmall.jpg But cutting down the factory spring leaves a one prong seat that is vastly inferior to the nicely finished springs from Timney/Wolff/Browning that leave a full circle of contact.

Personally I bought the Wolff 100pc. Miniature Coil Spring Pack that Midway carries for 2/3 the price of the 2 measly Timney springs. I added a washer between the trigger and spring and it helps fill the factory slop (milled face of the trigger where the spring seats) a lot without any binding on the adjustment screw (it really doesn't have all that much travel to begin with).

One thing to note though is that the sear bears about a pound or so of weight and your never going to get below that (nor should you) without changing the sear. But there are springs aplenty that get you where you need to be which is imo right around 1.5lbs.

The Wolff pack has lots of springs that will fit, of varying weights. About a pound and a half works out best in my rifle. Make sure if you go that route though that you choose the springs that don't bind at all and slide freely on the adj. screw shaft which means all those 2mm springs won't work on the 2mm shaft, use the 2.5mm ones with a washer or the larger ones without one (though for 17 cents or so I don't see why you wouldn't use a washer!)

HKGuns
November 5, 2011, 09:19 PM
Nice pictures and first post raingull.

Why does anyone need anything below a 3# trigger on a bolt action hunting rifle? My Sako's break like glass and I pay little, if any, attention to the weight of the trigger. It is the break, not the pull weight that is the difference between a great trigger and a good trigger. If you ask me a 1.5# trigger on a bolt action hunting rifle is foolish if not outright dangerous. My opinion only, if you need a trigger that light to shoot your hunting rig well, you'd better go out and get some more trigger time, or better yet, get some proper instruction. I don't want you in my hunting party if you're running around with a trigger that light.

Edited to add: I'm not calling anyone specifically out, just stating what I think needs to be said.

Raingull
November 5, 2011, 11:18 PM
Need is a relative term.

If you ask me a 1.5# trigger on a bolt action hunting rifle is foolish if not outright dangerous.Back up your statement. Maybe you should just send it directly to rifle basix and timney and shilen et al. (heck shilen has a competition trigger that can't go heavier than 6oz!) Walk the line at the 1000yrd matches and start casting aspersions at the foolish and dangerous souls there using bolt action hunting rifles with crisp light triggers (much lighter than 1.5lbs I might add).They must have AD's all the time right? Scary place!

if you need a trigger that light to shoot your hunting rig well, you'd better go out and get some more trigger time, or better yet, get some proper instruction.Not to shoot it well, to shoot it better. But then I'm one of those guys that thinks he owes his best to every animal he hunts.

Anything short of my best is never "good enough for hunting."

HKGuns
November 5, 2011, 11:42 PM
Raingull,

I just love it when this happens! You purposely narrow the circumstances (completely out of context btw) by bringing up a single instance where a light trigger would be a competitive advantage. If you're looking to start a fight, I'm not taking the bait.

I have no need to backup my opinion formed from many years of shooting, while never once needing to adjust a trigger so I can shoot a rifle accurately. I adapt to the tool.

Timney and the others are in business to sell a product and the more product they sell the more money they make. -Enough said.

Edited to add: Oh, I've never been to one, but am willing to bet when you walk the line of a 1000 yard match you're not likely to find many off the shelf Browning A-bolts with Timney triggers punching holes in paper.

Raingull
November 5, 2011, 11:54 PM
And you accuse me of narrowing the debate to specific parameters! (straw man argument).

It was your assertion that pull weight is not important only how the trigger breaks. If that's true why do so many competition triggers crowd the lines at shooting competitions? They must all be very poor shots. Actually your assertion is that the light triggers don't actually help them shoot more accurately at all so long as there trigger breaks crisp and clean!

If you can't trust your gun handling, fine, adapt to the blunt instrument. As for me and a great many others, we'll make the most out of the opportunities that come our way by any viable/safe means.

For what it's worth a (standard practice) long range, 2oz. trigger does shed light on how horribly unsafe a 1.5lb trigger is/nt.

Safety is not defined by a number but by the conditions of the working mechanism and the shooters interactions with that mechanism. My post was fairly clear on those parameters.

Do you even own an A-bolt II? (by your posts I'm going with no)

And for what it's worth it was you who came picking a fight (re-read your post).

castingdonkey
November 6, 2011, 12:56 AM
Welcome to the site raingull. I agree with your post's and am thankful for your advise.

Some of us like myself that hunt with a light trigger don't hike with a chambered round. I know people who do and I watch how they carry their rifle and avoid the muzzle. Not to mention letting them know when they swing it my way. Seems the real issue would be with 700 triggers and shotty installation, on top of morons pointing guns at people.

Do not point a gun at something you do not wish to destroy.

HKGuns
November 6, 2011, 09:05 AM
Do you even own an A-bolt II? (by your posts I'm going with no)

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s11/v33/p251309782-4.jpg

There is no relevance to my owning an A-bolt II but that is consistent with the other irrelevant points you're making. But I'll play.

HKGuns
November 6, 2011, 09:10 AM
Trying to predict what is next, yes, I own an A-bolt as well.

http://hkguns.zenfolio.com/img/s11/v34/p777714931-4.jpg

Raingull
November 7, 2011, 11:30 AM
The reason I doubted that you even owned an A-bolt was that you responded with, "My Sako's break like glass and I pay little, if any, attention to the weight of the trigger." Why wouldn't you relate something about your A-bolt's trigger as that would have been far more relevant than your Sakos?

And then, "Edited to add: Oh, I've never been to one, but am willing to bet when you walk the line of a 1000 yard match you're not likely to find many off the shelf Browning A-bolts with Timney triggers punching holes in paper."

And while I think that it's obvious that A-bolts aren't crowding the lines at Wimbledon, I don't think that you're going to find many off-the-shelf rifles at all, nor off the shelf stiff triggers I might add.

The A-bolt trigger is a good trigger, and maybe fine with a stiff spring for many. I'm not one of those and find it a great trigger with a lighter spring. I posted information about making it better and you objected to that (so don't lighten yours then).

If you want to make a reasoned case against a 1.5lb trigger then go ahead. Your several posts in without even beginning to build a case...

Raingull
November 8, 2011, 09:13 AM
Hadn't seen this before, but a cheaper option that some might want to try over the Timney springs is the Rifle Basix spring:
Replacement spring for Browning A-bolt. Gives you a wide range of pull between 1.25lbs-3.5lbs. Comes complete with instructions.Looks like you'll want to avoid this one or just back the adj. screw all the way out HK... It's just like the one I have in my A-bolt.

They have a good install pdf for anybody that wants to see it: http://www.riflebasix.com/BRN_SPRinstrucsheet.pdf

tiwil
November 8, 2011, 11:51 AM
HKguns is it a factory stock on the 2nd picture or is it aftermarket.

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