How many inflammatory hot-button terms can you spot…


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Airwolf
May 1, 2003, 11:26 PM
Well, it is from NJ after all... :barf:

http://www.northjersey.com/page.php?qstr=eXJpcnk3ZjczN2Y3dnFlZUVFeXk1MSZmZ2JlbDdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5NjM3Mjk5OCZ5cmlyeTdmNzE3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTM=

Bogota cops find arms cache

Thursday, May 1, 2003

By RAGHURAM VADAREVU
STAFF WRITER

BOGOTA - Police arrested four men and seized a cache of high-powered weapons, bulletproof vests, and nearly 1,000 rounds of hollow-point "cop killer" bullets from a Queen Anne Road apartment.

Investigators were not sure what the arsenal was for, but they suspect at least two of those arrested had pulled off, or were planning, large-scale robberies. Among the guns and ammunition were police scanners and chloroform, they said.

"I think we definitely got in the middle of something big," Detective Jimmy Sepp said Wednesday. "You don't have rifles and bulletproof vests unless you're planning on doing something with them."

Police arrested tenants Kishan Cannon, 25, and Malcolm Mottley, 27, on various drug and weapons charges after they were called to the apartment Tuesday on a report of a shooting. They were searching Wednesday for a third man who apparently lives at the apartment, although Sepp declined to identify him.

Early Tuesday, a first-floor resident called police after hearing a gunshot from the apartment above. Cannon told the responding officers two men had forced their way in, beat him and his girlfriend, then fired at him with a black 9mm handgun, Sepp said.

The bullet just missed Cannon, traveling through his baggy black sweat pants and gray T-shirt - leaving holes the size of dimes - before lodging in a wall, the detective said.

Neither Cannon nor his girlfriend had any visible marks of an assault, Sepp said.

Sgt. Danny Maye and Officers Robert Piterski and Regina Tasca questioned people outside the building, which led to several arrests.

One of the suspects, 25-year-old Jeffrey Montgomery of Englewood, had walked up and asked the officers what was happening, Sepp said. The officers also questioned Lawrence Thomas, 26, of Teaneck, who was standing at a pay phone outside a nearby tavern on Queen Anne Road, he said.

Moments later, Mottley approached police and told them that he had jumped out of his second-story bedroom window and hid in the bushes after he heard the gunshot in the apartment he shares with Cannon.

The officers took Mottley, Thomas, Montgomery, Cannon, and three witnesses to the police station for questioning.

"Of the seven people we interviewed, we got seven different stories," Sepp said.

One of those accounts led investigators to a Volkswagen Jetta parked on nearby Walnut Avenue. Inside, they found black ski masks, black gloves, 40 bags of marijuana, and $655 cash, Sepp said. Thomas, Montgomery, and an unidentified suspect allegedly borrowed the vehicle Monday night from Thomas' girlfriend, he said.

Because Mottley's name is on the lease, Sepp and Detective Timothy Geipel asked him whether they could search the apartment for evidence from the shooting. But Mottley refused, Sepp said, so the detectives obtained a search warrant.

In Mottley's room, Sepp said, they found a shotgun, a high-velocity rifle, and an automatic assault weapon loaded with at least 100 rounds of illegal hollow-point bullets, which expand on impact. They also found the bulletproof vests, scanners, and a bottle of chloroform, an anesthetic used to knock people unconscious, in the apartment, he said.

Cannon, Mottley, Montgomery, and Thomas were charged with various drug offenses, including possession of marijuana and possession of marijuana with the intent to distribute the drug, Sepp said.

Mottley also was charged with weapons possession because the guns were found in his room, he said. And Cannon was charged with illegal possession of police scanners.

The four men were being held on $50,000 bail each at the Bergen County Jail, Sepp said. Additional charges were expected as the investigation continues, he said.

Among the details detectives first must sort out, Sepp said, is who pulled the trigger in the Tuesday morning shooting. They also had not yet found the gun, he said.

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Justin
May 1, 2003, 11:44 PM
I submit that this story is a fabrication!
Those items are illegal in NJ, so therefore they must not exist within NJ borders because gun control laws work.

John G
May 1, 2003, 11:58 PM
"Illegal hollowpoint bullets" :confused: - Hollowpoints are illegal?

"automatic assault weapon" - I won't be suprised if this is a semi-auto rifle (with black stock, of course).

"high-velocity rifle" - Wow! The rifle is self-propelled? That's terrific!

:rolleyes:

Airwolf
May 2, 2003, 12:05 AM
"Illegal hollowpoint bullets" - Hollowpoints are illegal?

Yup, in the DPRNJ they sure are. Along with slingshots and oh, BTW you need a permit for a BB gun. :barf:

Everytime I'm about to blow a gasket about the DPRK and the BS I have to deal with here, I always think of D.C., NJ and IL and calm right down.

Standing Wolf
May 2, 2003, 12:13 AM
"Of the seven people we interviewed, we got seven different stories," Sepp said.

Shocking. Just shocking.

John G
May 2, 2003, 12:18 AM
Whoa, I didn't know that. So, NJ lawmakers prefer fmj ammo clearing the intended target, and continuing on to...wherever? The logic behind that baffles me.:eek:

I imagine NJ police are exempt from this law.

Airwolf
May 2, 2003, 12:27 AM
I imagine NJ police are exempt from this law.

But of course! Would you expect anything else? :fire:


f. Dum-dum or body armor penetrating bullets. (1) Any person, other than a law enforcement officer or persons engaged in activities pursuant to subsection f. of N.J.S.2C:39-6, who knowingly has in his possession any hollow nose or dum-dum bullet, or (2) any person, other than a collector of firearms or ammunition as curios or relics as defined in Title 18, United States Code, section 921 (a) (13) and has in his possession a valid Collector of Curios and Relics License issued by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, who knowingly has in his possession any body armor breaching or penetrating ammunition, which means: (a) ammunition primarily designed for use in a handgun, and (b) which is comprised of a bullet whose core or jacket, if the jacket is thicker than.025 of an inch, is made of tungsten carbide, or hard bronze, or other material which is harder than a rating of 72 or greater on the Rockwell B. Hardness Scale, and (c) is therefore capable of breaching or penetrating body armor, is guilty of a crime of the fourth degree. For purposes of this section, a collector may possess not more than three examples of each distinctive variation of the ammunition described above. A distinctive variation includes a different head stamp, composition, design, or color.

Jeff OTMG
May 2, 2003, 12:28 AM
NJ? I thought it was Columbia when I first read it. I nominate this article for an award, The Most Cliches In One Sentence.

boogalou
May 2, 2003, 12:28 AM
"You don't have rifles and bulletproof vests unless you're planning on doing something with them."

Boy, that's an understatement! I don't have maple syrup with pancakes unless I'm planning on doing something with them either! :cuss:

What a maroon!!!

Is this story for real? :what:

Bowlcut
May 2, 2003, 01:05 AM
I second that nomination.

And oh lord i have a knife in my pocket....i might be ready to use it. someone come take me to jail now

foghornl
May 2, 2003, 09:14 AM
I spotted 4, maybe I missed a few...

Monte Harrison
May 2, 2003, 11:31 AM
So, NJ lawmakers prefer fmj ammo clearing the intended target, and continuing on to...wherever? The logic behind that baffles me.That's cuz they ain't none. No gun control law has any basis in valid logic.

MJRW
May 2, 2003, 12:20 PM
"...which expand on impact." I needs to gets me some of them there expandin' type bullets. What they call 'em again?

PlayTheAces
May 2, 2003, 12:43 PM
I had no idea hollow points were illegal in NJ. Any other states that ban them?

I learned something new and I'm still on my first cup of coffee!

Oh, as to the question, the author definitely subscribes to the scandal sheet school of journalism.

Partisan Ranger
May 2, 2003, 03:22 PM
Yow, I'd hate to get hit by that 'high velocity rifle'! That would hurt like a SOAB!:p

Leftists have a natural advantage in the cultural battle, because so much of leftism is based upon knee-jerk emotional nonsense.

Strings
May 2, 2003, 04:54 PM
... I counted six...

Outlander
May 2, 2003, 05:17 PM
Hollow points are NOT illegal in NJ by way of the exemptions under N.J.S.2C:39-3.g.2 and N.J.S.2C:39-6f (ie. dwelling, land owned or possessed;while hunting, fishing or target shooting; place of purchase)

Just one note ... DO NOT SHOOT ANYONE IN SELF DEFENSE WITH A HOLLOW POINT ... THIS IS ILLEGAL (I dont think the police are even alowed to use them, ... along with stunguns and mace).
Using a hollow point (in the eyes of NJ law) means you wanted to inflict as much damage as possible (Duh, no s**t) and/or kill a person, not just defend yourself, and that makes you a bad person subject to prosecution
Not too long ago you WERE NOT EVEN ALLOWED to defend yourself in your home.

Elmer Snerd
May 2, 2003, 06:20 PM
"Of the seven people we interviewed, we got seven different stories," Sepp said.
Isn't that routine when interviewing eyewitnesses? How conveeeeenient of the writer to leave that out...


and an automatic assault weapon loaded with at least 100 rounds of illegal hollow-point bullets
Now THAT is a high-cap mag!


And Cannon was charged with illegal possession of police scanners.
Does anyone have more info about this? Do you need a Scanner Permit to own a scanner in PRNJ?

Is the EBP in the photo a Calico?

These guys were up to no good. The article is still disgracefully sensationalistic and its author is at least ill-informed about firearms.

Nathaniel Firethorn
May 2, 2003, 06:57 PM
http://www.northjersey.com/lib/get_page_image.php?qstr=ZmdiZWw3Zjd2cWVlRUV5eTYzNzI5OTgmc2ViYWdjbnRyZWVFRXl5MSZ2em50cjdmN3ZxZWVFRXl5MjI5Ng==

Unfortunately, I didn't find an email address for the author. If I had, I think I'd have written a polite note explaining some of his errors of fact, and offering to teach him the basics as I know them.

- pdmoderator

Peetmoss
May 2, 2003, 07:06 PM
Glad I don't live in Jersey I though NY was bad ack.

Airwolf
May 2, 2003, 07:08 PM
Does anyone have more info about this? Do you need a Scanner Permit to own a scanner in PRNJ?

Found this:

http://www.fordyce.org/scanning/scanning_info/nj-laws.html

Section 397 - New State Statutes (1995)
Code of Criminal Justice
Riot, Disorderly Conduct, etc.

2C:33-21. Use of information intercepted from police, fire or emergency medical communications system

Any person who intercepts any message or transmission made on or over any police, fire or emergency medical communications system, or any person who is the recipient of information so intercepted, and who uses the information obtained thereby to facilitate the commission of or the attempt to commit a crime or violation of any law of this State, or uses the same in a manner which interferes with the discharge of police operations, shall be guilty of a crime of the fourth degree.
L.1991, c. 432, s. 1, eff. Jan 18, 1992.

2C:33-22. Possession of radio capable of receiving transmission from police, fire, or emergency medical communication system

Any person who, while in the course of committing or attempting to commit a crime, including the immediate flight therefrom, possesses or controls a radio capable of receiving any message or transmission made on or over any police, fire or emergency medical communications system, shall be guilty of a crime of the fourth degree.
L.1991, c. 432, s. 2, eff. Jan 18, 1992.

Todd L. Sherman/KB4MHH
afn09444@afn.org

PERSONAL NOTE: Watch out for local City Ordinances. It has been my own experience (ex., in Ocean City in 1989/90) that some NJ cities believe thier own ordinances preempt that of the State and Federal Government, and not the other way around. You can take it to court and fight it; but you're without your scanner in the meanwhile if it is confiscated. My advice, go to the local Law Library and look up the local ordinances for the cities you plan to travel into/through while in NJ. (And don't let your scanner be obvious while in Ocean City. The local laws there may have changed since my visit; but until known for sure -- I wouldn't take the chance.) -TS

Nathaniel Firethorn
May 2, 2003, 07:24 PM
In fairness, none of that prohibits you from owning a police scanner, just from using one while committing a crime.

But then, I'm probably committing a felony for slouching in my chair...

- pdmoderator

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