Poor Man's Rifle Safe: Large Tool Chest


PDA






Drakejake
July 6, 2006, 10:31 PM
Today's project was to move a large Knaack tool chest (c. five feet long, two feet wide, two feet high, 180 lbs) from my storage building and put it in my bedroom. I have assembled quite a collection of rifles but have no good place to put them. I have been stashing them here and there, behind this, under that, and sometimes I cannot remember where I hid something. I don't have a good place for a massive, upright, 700lb gun safe. Then I remembered that I had this monster tool chest and decided to use that. I am very happy with the result. The chest locks with two padlocks inset into the chest to foil jimmying. It holds all of my rifles (in padded cases) with special holders for mags, etc. This chest has a lip on the inside of the walls about a foot from the bottom. Some pieces of plywood cut to fit installed on these lips will allow me to have a two story gun case. About 2500 rounds of SA .308 in plastic ammo boxes add to the weight. I am considering whether to bolt the chest down.

Drakejake

If you enjoyed reading about "Poor Man's Rifle Safe: Large Tool Chest" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
RNB65
July 6, 2006, 10:38 PM
Did you consider standing it on end to use as a vertical cabinet? Wood blocks underneath can create enough clearance for the door to open and close. It'll take up less floor space and you can anchor it to a wall stud.

Right now I'm using one of the Stack-on cabinets. Been thinking about getting a jobsite chest as they look sturdier and more secure.

Drakejake
July 6, 2006, 10:56 PM
Mine is a job site chest. Yes, I considered standing the chest on end but I am sure it works better as originally intended. I have several metal, removable tool holders that sit inside on the top edges of the chest. These are accessories for the chest. They will work well holding mags and smaller objects. They could not be used very well if the chest were on end. Gravity helps keep everything in place when the chest is placed with the top on top.

Drakejake

ReadyontheRight
July 7, 2006, 01:20 AM
You may want to set it up so you can take the guns out of the cases. Leaving guns in the case can make them rust.

hps1
July 7, 2006, 01:08 PM
RoR:You may want to set it up so you can take the guns out of the cases. Leaving guns in the case can make them rust.

Sure can.

A friend used several tool boxes and he cut wooden partitions to hold the guns cradled horizontally, two tiers deep, IIRC. His wife made slip covers and a couple of pillows on top made them look like love seats which further increased security IMO.

Regards,
hps

Drakejake
July 7, 2006, 01:51 PM
The only time I have had any rust with a rifle that was in a case was when I stored several rifles in a basement room with the AC off. That room has a humidity problem, especially with no AC or heat. A rifle in that room that was not in a case also showed a little rust. Rifles I have stored in cases in a street level room have never rusted. I have also stored pistols wrapped in plastic in that room without any rust. So I am not sure that storing in cloth or plastic cases always causes rust or that storing a rifle without a case necessarily prevents rust. Of course I agree that a coating of oil is useful for preventing rust.

Drakejake

Dave P
July 7, 2006, 02:15 PM
" I have been stashing them here and there, behind this, under that, and sometimes I cannot remember where I hid something."

So what's the problem, Drake? I pulled a rifle out from under the sink and my daughter says "was that under the sink?" - I say: why no, of course not - why would I keep a rifle under the sink?!?!

And then the time I was about to accuse my kids of pawning another rifle, when I discovered it behind the couch - now how did it get there??

Dave

Drakejake
July 7, 2006, 06:23 PM
A year or two ago I thought I had lost my Kel Tec .32 and bought another one. Several months later I found the lost mini-pistol under some clothes in the closet. I had stuck it under there for safe-keeping and had forgotten about it.

Thousands for guns--not one penny for gun safes!

Drakejake

bofe954
July 8, 2006, 09:38 PM
That's not a poor man's safe, it's a poor man's RSC.

...kidding.:neener:

jlmurphy
July 9, 2006, 01:06 AM
Some job box tool boxes have the recessed padlock pockets that may require gravity to latch, otherwise great idea.

tulsamal
July 9, 2006, 03:01 AM
You may want to set it up so you can take the guns out of the cases. Leaving guns in the case can make them rust.

I would agree that you shouldn't store firearms in a safe inside a zippered type heavy case. There is a lot of thick material there. Once zippered, the air is trapped. Any moisture in that case can end up on your gun. Trapped on the surface of the steel with material pushed into it. I've seen guns that did have surface rust that exactly matched up to their pressure points in a soft case.

That's why I either store my guns "naked" in a safe or in the Bore-Store products. I've been buying them for rifles and handguns both. I can shove more guns in the safes when I'm using them since they won't scratch each other. But they are sort of an open weave that allows air to circulate. The little fold over flap is a long way from airtight. And they are treated. As it says on the MidwayUSA site:

Protect your valuable firearms against rust, dirt and scratches. Made from a special fabric that will not retain moisture and has been treated with silicone plus a specially formulated rust inhibitor. The thick pile interior protects against nicks or scratches, while the hook-and-loop flap keeps your gun secure. Bore Stores offer worry-free, long-term storage without heavy oils or grease.

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=619823

They make them in a bunch of different sizes. They are inexpensive. Actually i only have one complaint. The darn things all look the same. So I end up pulling out half a dozen of them trying to find the Colt Python or whatever. My plan is to put some kind of tag on them. Like little luggage tags or some other kind of tag with a little metal loop I can thread through the material. Then I can just look at the tags to figure out where the Ruger 50th Anniversary .44 Blackhawk went!

Gregg

Mauserguy
July 9, 2006, 03:43 AM
DrakeJake,
I too use a tool chest for storage. I prefer the Greenlee Boxes, though. They are a heavier guage of steel. At any rate, I am pretty confident that they will stop all smash and grab criminals. Only determined robbers, with power tools, will get into the box. It's not as secure as a regular safe, but it is still very tough.
Mauserguy

hso
July 9, 2006, 12:16 PM
Mask it as a blanket chest/love seat and it won't be as tacky as a job box sitting in the bedroom and it'll serve the additional purpose of providing a place to sit for kicking off boots.;)

I'll second the idea of not storing weapons in foam padded cases because they hold moisture.

olywa
July 9, 2006, 12:33 PM
I'm in the process of turning an upright freezer into a safe. Remove the motor and replace it with a small closet dampness controller, add some interior framing to hold the contents in place, turn the key and call it good. The best part is that anyone who sees it will think it's just another freezer.

TMM
July 9, 2006, 12:42 PM
All you need is a wheelbarrow...
[har har..]:D

~TMM

olywa
July 9, 2006, 01:36 PM
Yeah, but a really big wheelbarrow...

If you enjoyed reading about "Poor Man's Rifle Safe: Large Tool Chest" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!