Question on Marlin 336cs


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03Shadowbob
July 10, 2006, 04:32 PM
Hi everyone. This is my first post on this great forum. There's a ton of great knowledge here so first things first...thanks.

OK, I just bought a cherry Marlin 30-30 336cs for $250. Can anyone tell me how the cs model varies from others? I was on Marlin's website and they don't mention the cs model. I also can't locate the serial number so I am sure I am looking in the wrong areas for it. Any other info would be greatly appreciated. thanks again everyone.

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Vairochana
July 10, 2006, 08:55 PM
never heard of it- do you have a photo?
I suspect it is just in the dressing etc

Cosmoline
July 10, 2006, 09:07 PM
The CS has been their standard 20" model. I'm not sure what "CS" stands for.

Chawbaccer
July 10, 2006, 09:09 PM
CS was the delux model with a checkered walnut stock and grip cap, I forget what the CS actually stood for. It was discontinued a few years ago when the 336C was introduced. Te SN is on the top tang behind the trigger.

rbernie
July 10, 2006, 09:47 PM
What was the RC vs the CS? Anyone know?

Chawbaccer
July 11, 2006, 09:46 AM
My findings are:
C stands for carbine,A is for rifle, RC is a regular carbine, CS was the designation of the rifle with the cross bolt safety, SC has the short magazine.
somebody knows more than I so keep adding and making correction.

R.H. Lee
July 11, 2006, 12:48 PM
I don't know what CS means. I have a 336W which has a checkered stock, a gold colored trigger, and a camo sling, FWIW :)

rbernie
July 11, 2006, 01:21 PM
C stands for carbine,A is for rifle, RC is a regular carbine, CS was the designation of the rifle with the cross bolt safety, SC has the short magazine.
I have an RC with a 20" barrel - what would differentiate a rifle from a carbine?

xtarheel
July 11, 2006, 01:32 PM
I bought a Marlin 336-C in .35 Remington back in '68 or '69. At that time the difference between the 336 and 336-C was that the "C" had a pistol grip and the 336 was a straight stock like the Winchester 94. I believe when they added the cross bolt safety, they tacked on the "S".

fixray
September 6, 2008, 03:19 PM
The s was added in the early 80's when they installed CBS, around 02/03 they dropped the s, I have one actually a gift in 1983, it's a fun little rifle and shoots pretty true.

SSN Vet
September 7, 2008, 09:47 PM
I have the exact same rifle.

It's both a beauty and a shooter.

Stock is Walnut, not cherry. But the mistake is easilly forgiveable, as it is a pretty piece of furniture with nice sharp cut checkering.

As others have already correctly noted...

'C' is for the deluxe models with walnut stock
'S' is for the cross bolt safety.

Lot's of guy curse the cross bolt safety, because you can forget that you set it and then bumble a shot at that trophy buck. They will usually argue that the half cock safety is all anyone would ever need.

There is one specific time when the cross bolt safety is very important (imho), and I pretty sure it was added for this potential problem.

The standard way to unoad the tube mag when you're packing it in for the day is to cycle the action untill all the cartridges are ejected. (Typically you might do this over a towel or blanket at the tail gait of your truck so you don't have to pick your best hunting ammo out of the mud.)

after cycling the action the first time, the hammer is cocked and if you are not careful to keep you finger out of the trigger gaurd while continuing to cycle the action, you could accidentally discharge the weapon.

That's the only time I use it. I use the half cock safety in the field.

Setting the cross bolt safty while the rifle is at half cock is a sure recipee to forget to turn it off and miss an opportunity.

Bartkowski
September 7, 2008, 09:53 PM
And while the s may have been added in the 80's, this thread stopped in 2006.

jduvall89
June 2, 2009, 01:54 AM
I just bought the 336 CS, but do not know the date of it..I will look up the serial number shortly, but I have a question. My rifle does not have the cut checkering, it is just smooth. I have not seen any others like this, does anyon know why this one is not checkered? Thanks

ants
June 2, 2009, 02:12 AM
Old thread, but still good for something...

jduvall89 - According to the Blue Book, 336CS production began in 1984. Only in 1994 did checkering become standard. When you look up the serial number you may find that you have one from those first 10 years of production, or your stock was replaced with one from that era.

rbernie if you're still reading this thread, anticipating an answer:
In 1948 the 336A (24" rifle) and 336RC (20" carbine) started production. The rifle ceased production in 1962, the carbine continued until 1968. In 1973 production started again, but with different model designations. So the A was the 24" rifle, the RC was the 20" carbine.

The Blue Book may not be the definitive biography of every gun, but basic model info is usually there.

jduvall89
June 2, 2009, 02:16 AM
oh okay, man thats older then I thought..Is there any thing I should do before taking it to the range?

also, what would be a good,affordable sling?

BigBlue
August 2, 2009, 08:20 PM
I have both the 336RC in .35 Rem. and the 336CS in .30-30. The RC is from 1957 the CS more recent. Both were bought in very rough shape and refinished. I paid $225 for the 336CS and $195 for the 336RC. Both shoot great! Here's a photo of each.
Don

http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r150/leverguns1895/P6230005.jpg
336CS


http://i143.photobucket.com/albums/r150/leverguns1895/336021.jpg
336RC

TUBBY1
August 3, 2009, 01:07 PM
So what about a model30aw with checkering stock and forearm,gold trigger and sight?how does that fall into 336?

BigBlue
August 4, 2009, 10:07 PM
From what I've read, the Marlin 30 aw started out as their lower end Glenfield 30as which had a birch stock. Sometime in the mid 80s, I believe 1983 they dropped the Glenfield line and turned that model into the Marlin 30 as. From 1984-1988 they were only made for Walmart sales and the designation changed to Model 30 aw. Basically I believe it is the same rifle as the 336, but spec'ed out for Walmart. I'm not sure if they kept the birch stock or changed it to walnut.
Don

kmichael2001
December 14, 2009, 12:02 AM
Sorry to resurrect this old thread, but my question is on the Marlin 336CS .30/30. I have read this thread and found some great info. I am not a gun expert by any stretch, but my dad did teach me to shoot and hunt when I was in elementary and jr. high, but I lost interest and sort of got out of it. But I still have the above gun that he bought me. It is a 1985 serial number. smooth walnut stock, and I just cleaned and oiled it for the first time since, well way back then. But no rust that some oil would not remove. the gun is clean. I am interested in cleaning it right and making sure I have the right ammo. All I want to do with it is do some shooting with some guys at my church. But who knows when I might need to kill an elephant or something. :) Here are my questions:

1. How many cartridges will the gun hold? Not including the chamber.
2. i cleaned out the barrel with a riffle cleaning kit, gun oil, and cleaning patches. Do I need to clean the barrel until there the patches are clean? Or will shooting it a few times clean it up? I have used a dozen or so patches and there is still a bit or residue on the white patches.
3. I went to Wal-Mart to get ammo and all they had was Federal 30-30 WIN 170 Grain Soft Point RN. (Also what does the RN stand for.) Is this ammo ok for my stated purposes in this post? Will it shoot ok in this gun or is there something else which is more preferred?
4. When cleaning the outside of the gun, I sprayed a rag with gun oil and wiped it down, getting it all the nooks and crannies. Then I wiped it clean. Can I get the gun too oily?

I shot this gun deer hunting as a kid and remembered loving it. I have it clean up pretty good and want to fire off a dozen rounds this week to get the feel for it and adjust the scope.

Thanks to all who can answer these questions. I love this gun and am getting excited about shooting again for sport. (Not really a hunter again yet, but might get into it one day.)

K

Nathanael_Greene
December 14, 2009, 12:11 AM
1. How many cartridges will the gun hold? Not including the chamber.
2. i cleaned out the barrel with a riffle cleaning kit, gun oil, and cleaning patches. Do I need to clean the barrel until there the patches are clean? Or will shooting it a few times clean it up? I have used a dozen or so patches and there is still a bit or residue on the white patches.
3. I went to Wal-Mart to get ammo and all they had was Federal 30-30 WIN 170 Grain Soft Point RN. (Also what does the RN stand for.) Is this ammo ok for my stated purposes in this post? Will it shoot ok in this gun or is there something else which is more preferred?
4. When cleaning the outside of the gun, I sprayed a rag with gun oil and wiped it down, getting it all the nooks and crannies. Then I wiped it clean. Can I get the gun too oily?

1. 6.
2. Well, that depends. The patches should be mostly clean. If there's lot of really dark gunk on the patches, keep going. Using a .30" brass bore brush soaked in Hoppe's #9 will knock a lot of that stuff out and reduce the number of cleaning patches needed.
3. The 170's are fine; a little more recoil than the 150's, but for targets within a hundred yards, there's no significant difference. (RN=round nose, I believe, though the bullets are really flat-tipped.)
4. Yes, you can get a gun too oily, but by that point you wouldn't even want to pick it up, it'd be so slimy. Do you live in a high-humidity area? If so, better a little too much oil than too little.

Have fun with the Marlin! Truly a sweet-shooting rifle that everyone should own.

kmichael2001
December 14, 2009, 12:22 AM
Nathan,

Thanks a million. I just loaded 6, cocked one into the chamber and fit the 7th one in. Pretty cool to unload this gun. It unloads all 7 pretty easily. (not firing bw) :) I am in mid Missouri so yet we have alot of humidity at times. I did not over oil the gun. I wiped it down to a comfortable feel. I want to find a hard case to keep it in. Had it free standing in a closet for years, it drew some moisture and a bit of mold on the stock. Looks great now after a cleaning. I will take your advise with the brass bore brush and Hoppe's #9 to clean the inside of the barrel. I want it clean before I shoot it.

Thanks again.

K

PS: If you or anyone knows of an online source to download the original owners manual to such a gun, that too would be appreciated!

WTB-Marlin336Y
December 22, 2009, 08:43 PM
You can download an owner's manual from the marlin website, and I believe it is just a generic manual for all 336's. I am about to buy a 336SC, and I want to modify it to make it shorter so it's more like a 336Y.

Daizee
December 28, 2009, 03:21 PM
kmichael, note that padded cases can retain moisture as they restrict air movement substantially. They can actually make corrosion worse. They're better for transportation than long-term storage. Good *dry* airflow is ideal. It might be worth investing in a dri-rod (or whatever they're called). I have one of those in the closet which contains the arms locker. That plus some bags of desicant. The Rem-Dry stuff is spendy. I use silica (NOT CLAY!) kitty litter tied up in re-usable shop towels as all-purpose desicant.

-Daizee

clem
December 28, 2009, 03:53 PM
Go to www.marlinowners.com and your questions about Marlins should be answered.

ttheel
February 11, 2010, 10:39 PM
Just took my old Marlin 336CS out of the gun cabinet last Saturday and spent about 2 hours giving it a darned good cleaning. It was my Deer hunting rifle from my early teen years until about 1991 when I moved up to a Browning A-bolt 7mm Rem mag. I always loved the little 30-30 Marlin and still to this day It owns the mantle of bringing down my largest Whitetail deer.

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