Liberal City Folk Just Don't like Camping


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Polishrifleman
July 26, 2006, 01:29 PM
:D Other than that they enjoy shooting just like the rest of us.
MSNBC.com


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Deer hunting game is a surprise hit
Big Buck Hunter Pro is popular with urbanites in liberal areas
By Adam Goldman
Associated Press Writer
The Associated Press


Updated: 3:51 p.m. PT July 25, 2006
NEW YORK - Alexandra Broseus grabs a shotgun, lifts it to her slender shoulder, pumps, and readies her aim.

Seconds later, she's firing furiously, gunning down the animated deer darting across the screen of this video game inside a popular, hipster bar in Manhattan called Horseshoe.

When the shooting ends and the adrenaline wanes, Broseus wearing a zebra-striped dress _ brings the plastic barrel to her lips and blows the imaginary smoke into the air.

"Yeah (expletive)," Broseus says, reaching for a nearby can of Pabst Blue Ribbon.

Called Big Buck Hunter Pro, the coin-operated machine has evolved into the hottest-selling, biggest-moneymaking video game in bars and arcades across the country thanks to youthful urbanites like Broseus.

And the game has become surprisingly popular in liberal bastions like New York City that have strict gun laws and where the idea of real hunting repulses many residents.

"It's very strange, and I've been doing games for about 24 years. There's some kind of hipness to it," said George Petro, president of Play Mechanix Inc., the Chicago-area company that designed the game.

While older versions of the game have always done fairly well in the Midwest and other deer-hunting regions, the newest line Big Buck Hunter Pro has caught fire everywhere, mainly because of changes in the design.

Petro said the fifth and latest version of Big Buck uses a PC platform, an upgrade that let designers install modern graphics, giving the game more lifelike features. Petro also added a second shotgun, so two players could fire away simultaneously, raising the competitive stakes and bragging rights.

"The pro came out and I was hooked," said 25-year-old Sebastian Baumer of New York City, who has been playing Big Buck for about a year and has spent about $2,000 refining his skills.

Baumer is one of the most lethal shots on the East Side.

"I've been beaten obviously but on a consistent basis? No," Baumer asserts from a bar in the East Village, which has four of the games within several blocks of one another.

Big Buck players score points for accuracy, distance and the animal's weight. There are different hunting adventures in several states such as Montana, Idaho, Nevada and Wyoming. There, players can stalk elk, antelope, big horn sheep, moose and, of course, bucks.

Just like in real life, a head or neck shot instantly brings down the animal. Gut shots take two or three rounds.

Slaying an innocent ewe or doe is forbidden. The gun locks up and the other player gains the advantage.

"That's the kiss of death," said John L. Less, a 35-year-old consultant who played the game for the first time recently at ACE bar.

When blasted, the deer tumble to the ground; the birds explode into billows of feathers, the bunny rabbits into a cloud of fur. Bonus rounds include shooting frenetic turkey, rampaging boar, thick cow paddies, whiskey jugs and ducks.

The machines spit out endearing lines like this one: "That's some nice shootin'" and other catchy commentary.

But more importantly, this form of hunting is relatively easy. The hunter doesn't have to shiver outside in the cold for hours waiting for a trophy buck to arrive. And favorite hipster pastimes such as drinking beer are permitted, making this an urban draw.

"It's distilled to the cool part, the shooting," Petro said. "The thrill is getting the kill. That's what we distilled in the game."

The fine-tuning of Big Buck has led to some unexpected success in this tough business that has been squeezed with the rapid technological advancement of home video games, said Bob Boals, executive vice president of Betson Enterprises Inc., which distributes and markets Big Buck worldwide.

"We are very stunned," Boals said. "It's doing extremely well in the Northeast and West Coast. It's been so well received in all the different locations. We did not see this in the prior buck hunters."

Big Buck came out in 2000 and sold a modest 6,200 machines in about six years, Boals said. But when the pro version hit bars and arcades in February 2006, the game started goring the competition.

Betson expects to unload 6,000 pro machines this year, and Boals projects he'll easily move a total of 10,000 over time. Betson is the only company that sells pro hunter _ either directly or through distribution partners.

According to the July edition of RePlay Magazine, which tracks the industry, distributors voted Big Buck the best upright video game, 12 spots above bar-legend Golden Tee.

The machines sell for $6,000, earning $350 week on average, 80 percent more than rival Golden Tee, Boals said. One of the country's top Big Buck machines generates nearly $3,000 a month at a Connecticut casino, he said.

Broseus says there's no mystery to why New Yorkers crave Big Buck.

"It makes perfect sense," she said. "It's the whole thing of going out and hunting in the city. Part of the appeal of New York is going out and doing anything. In the same night, you can go hunting and smoke a hookah."

But not every city dweller approves.

"I am a friend of the animals," said Lucy Knight, a vegetarian, who has worked as ACE's manager for two years. "I find it disturbing for people to get so much pleasure out of it."

Will this start a trend? Will hipsters start taking to the woods en masse with Remingtons and Mossbergs?

Hunting purists hope not.

"I thank god they are doing it in a bar," said Russell Thornberry, Editor in Chief of Buckmasters Whitetail Magazine in Montgomery, Ala. "I'm not sure I'd want them hunting anywhere near where I was hunting. They'd be a danger to me and the deer."

2006 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
URL: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/14030610/?GT1=8307


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2006 MSNBC.com

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hso
July 26, 2006, 01:38 PM
But more importantly, this form of hunting is relatively easy.

"form of hunting"??? hunting?:scrutiny:

IT'S A VIDEO GAME FOR HEAVEN'S SAKE!:banghead:

Smokey Joe
July 26, 2006, 02:30 PM
"It's distilled to the cool part, the shooting," Petro said. "The thrill is getting the kill. That's what we distilled in the game."

Err, so that's it? Why we hunt is to blast things into oblivion??

Sorry, guy, you missed the mark, there. Heck, you missed the backstop.

How do we go about explaining it to somebody with his attitude?? :banghead:

Pilgrim
July 26, 2006, 02:32 PM
Do they get to clean their kill and gag when they accidentally cut the gut?

Pilgrim

'Card
July 26, 2006, 02:36 PM
The hunter doesn't have to shiver outside in the cold for hours waiting for a trophy buck to arrive.
Try weeks or months.

Next thing you know, all the New Yorkers will be wearing camouflage.

Oh, wait... :rolleyes:

WR Olsen
July 26, 2006, 02:40 PM
All this will do is add to the stereotyping of "hunters" as wild, drunken boors. The comment that the game designers focused on the "thrill of the kill" not only misses the point it adds ammunition to the gun haters bag of tricks

Leatherneck
July 26, 2006, 03:01 PM
inside a popular, hipster bar in Manhattan called Horseshoe.
Broseus says, reaching for a nearby can of Pabst Blue Ribbon.

WOW. PBR is hip?:confused:

TC

c_yeager
July 26, 2006, 03:05 PM
WOW. PBR is hip?

I think it might be part of the "authentic New York City rural hunting experience". You know, total-immersion in the "lifestyle".

oh blanky
July 26, 2006, 03:13 PM
Now that I live in the hills of East TN, I'm glad the city folks stay out of the woods.

Of course, if they did come out here, we might have to "deliverance" them.

Justin
July 26, 2006, 03:13 PM
Yeah. PBR got hip again a couple years ago. I think it was back when hipsters started wearing construction boots and jauntily-angled trucker caps with Caterpillar logos on them to be ironic.

Drinking PBR out of a sense of irony. Talk about really suffering for your lifestyle.

cbsbyte
July 26, 2006, 03:18 PM
On a side note, in the Wall Street Journal a few months ago they had an article about how taxidermied animals is now chic with the upscale urban deweller. Most whom are strong enviromentalist and anti animal curelty. Talk about irony. It must be something in the city water system.

roscoe
July 26, 2006, 04:37 PM
Try not to conflate Manhattanites with all city-dwellers. New York, especially, Manhattan, is not reality.

ezypikns
July 26, 2006, 04:43 PM
ain't like cities in other places.

Dionysusigma
July 26, 2006, 05:15 PM
And coming soon,
[B]Big Buck Hunter Pro 2007!
Kill 700 deer without one miss, and the game dispenses
1 lb. of genuine imitation venison jerky!

/voice

:D

Hoppy590
July 26, 2006, 05:22 PM
Drinking PBR out of a sense of irony. Talk about really suffering for your lifestyle.


as opposed to those of us who have to suffer for our hobbys costs on our wallets haha

pointing out the irony of antis is pointless. we had soem one at my school berate me about guns, only moments later to say "let me take a shot at it" and others gun related terms "shootin from the hip" ect. the worse is when they talk about how no one should have guns except police and go "well if some one breaks into my house il call you" ya, il laugh and hang up

Preacherman
July 26, 2006, 06:05 PM
Next thing you know they'll be dressing in faux Western clothing and riding mechanical bulls in pseudo-saloons! :fire:

Oh - wait a minute . . . :uhoh:

:D

Smokey Joe
July 26, 2006, 06:51 PM
They pay outrageous prices for previously-well-broken-in jeans that a Real Cowboy wore while he worked. The jeans come with documentation, including a description of the cowboy who wore them. Ye Gods!

It must be these people who are buying the Mitchell Mausers to add to their collection.

Dionysusigma
July 26, 2006, 06:55 PM
Pfft. They don't buy guns. They scream at the sight of 'em. :rolleyes:

XD Fan
July 26, 2006, 07:37 PM
Didn't you read the article? That one 25 year-old had dropped $2000 :confused: on this game in about a year!! They are suffering financially for their hobby just like us! Give these wannabes their just dues. He could have bought a nice (real) gun for that kind of money. Maybe I am just missing the point.

mustanger98
July 26, 2006, 07:38 PM
:scrutiny: :scrutiny: :uhoh: [Jack Palance] "City folk..." [/Jack Palance]

'Card
July 26, 2006, 07:49 PM
...add to the stereotyping of "hunters" as wild, drunken boors.
I'm not usually drunken.

torpid
July 26, 2006, 08:22 PM
They pay outrageous prices for previously-well-broken-in jeans that a Real Cowboy wore while he worked. The jeans come with documentation, including a description of the cowboy who wore them. Ye Gods!

You don't really want to know why they want to own used cowboy jeans...
:uhoh:

mete
July 26, 2006, 09:22 PM
They're hopeless because out in the woods they can never find the outlet to plug in the hair drier !!!

No_Brakes23
July 26, 2006, 09:53 PM
Try not to conflate Manhattanites with all city-dwellers. New York, especially, Manhattan, is not reality.

No kiddin.

And anyway, most of the leftists I know love camping. Hello, hippies, anyone? REI is no bastion of conservatives, somebody is buying their stuff. One of the clerks in there about fell over when I said I was getting web strap to make a rifle sling.

tellner
July 26, 2006, 10:36 PM
Strangely enough, over half the campers I've met are liberals of one stripe or another. They are more likely to do the hike and tent version. The conservatives were overwhelmingly the RV and generator crowd. This isn't good or bad. It just is.

evan price
July 27, 2006, 12:42 AM
Agreed... know of one specific country club type who married into "the family" and I aksed, say, when do you want to go camping with us? (Since his new wife loved to camp and hike and fish) and he said, "When I feel like camping out I'll stay at a Holiday Inn instead of a 4 star place"

Brass Fetcher
July 27, 2006, 12:59 AM
"They might not like camping, but they have all the 'rugged' trucks in the world".

Sometimes when I see a Hummer with a studio-outdoorsman in it (every one so far), I just think about my dad (RVN 70-71) and lifetime hunter/fisherman and the beat up old Ford Bronco that he used to drive. It's a funny scale : he might know 10 times more about the outdoors than a yuppy, but his truck was worth maybe 1/10 of what these new 'rugged outdoors' vehicles are... :confused: ?

Brian Dale
July 27, 2006, 01:41 AM
I don't get it. Urban liberals are enjoying a video game that has them blasting away at things -- admittedly, it's animated Bambis and bunnies -- and we're being disparaging about it?

A few of these yups might end up becoming interested in going out shooting for real, and possibly hunting later. One hopes that people like us will take them out and show them how to behave properly with firearms, and let them find out how much fun it is to blast clay birds, paper targets, stale cookies, charcoal briquets and the like. Without sneering at them.

"I am a friend of the animals," said Lucy Knight, a vegetarian, who has worked as ACE's manager for two years. "I find it disturbing for people to get so much pleasure out of it."Hey Lady, they're photons on a screen. Relax.

I'm pleasantly surprised that this appeared in AP without any references to criminals or to children. ...wearing...jauntily-angled trucker caps with Caterpillar logos on them to be ironic.Justin, George Hayduke and Bonnie Abbzug did it first :neener: -- boy, do I feel old. ;)

akodo
July 27, 2006, 02:15 AM
I don't get why anti-hunters like these games.

To me, if I find somethign morally wrong, I would not only refuse to participate in the real thing, I would refuse to play pretend at it.

Could you imagine a game where the goal was to rape women, but it was all right because 'it isn't real it is only a game' or manage a slave plantation? I am sorry, my mind just doesn't think like that.


However, some people's minds apparently do, that is why games that glorify gangs and criminals seem to be increasing.

I am not saying such games should be illegal or anything like that, I am just saying if you play a video game where you choose to have your character slap women around and make them your whores, I won't believe that you are truely a person who respects women as your equal.

cracked butt
July 27, 2006, 02:58 AM
I've seen these games in a few bars and restaurants in my area, but I've never seen anyone playing them.

When I was in college I liked to play 'Area 51' because in real life I couldn't go into a secret government installation and shoot space aliens with a machine pistol in real life. I also liked 'Motal Combat' because I couldn't rip people's spines out in real life either.

I'm betting there are a lot of 'wannabes' who like to play racing games or 1st person shooter games thta posted on this thread.

Its just fantasy fun folks.

LAK
July 27, 2006, 05:11 AM
"It's distilled to the cool part, the shooting," Petro said. "The thrill is getting the kill. That's what we distilled in the game."
This is pinko-popular culture - spread by the change agents in their various forms of audio, video and print pop culture media - distilled and rising to the surface.

Very evident in this quote; where the thrill is in "the kill" - as opposed to the chase where it belongs. In addition to the accompanying and incidental aspects to hunting.

-----------------------------------------

http://ussliberty.org
http://ssunitedstates.org

evan price
July 27, 2006, 05:26 AM
Could you imagine a game where the goal was to rape women, but it was all right because 'it isn't real it is only a game' or manage a slave plantation? I am sorry, my mind just doesn't think like that.




IIRC, in Japan, there is a video game based upon the manga, "Rapeman", where the "hero" is a man who "liberates" women by raping them..

Sick, eh?:scrutiny:

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