how to store ammo home?


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loonie
August 1, 2006, 11:31 AM
I bought 1000 rounds .22 and 500 rounds 9mm,how to store safely home? I plan to get a safe to store them. anyone has better suggestions?

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zippo8
August 1, 2006, 11:54 AM
I store mine in sealed ammo containers raised off the floor. Learned the hard way when my garage flooded from a broken water heater. I also drop a dessicant package in each containter. I have also seen a lock mechanism that you can add to the ammo containers, but haven't tried it yet.

1911ShooterTJ
August 1, 2006, 12:23 PM
+1 on the sealed ammo containers. It doesn't get much easier.

I also find them extremely convenient since all I have to do is label the container and I know exactly where to find all my ammo and what kind of box to grab to go shooting. :cool:

kfranz
August 1, 2006, 12:59 PM
You state no reason why it would be unsafe to store them in the boxes they came in. I've got a basement full of the stuff and have never had a problem. Some in ammo cans, some in mags, much of it in the cardboard boxes that the originating country packed them into 40 years ago....

ilbob
August 1, 2006, 01:12 PM
Surplus army ammo cans work great. The handles make it a lot easier to cart around than a heavy box. You can buy ammo cans for under $5 at most gun shows.

A desiccant bag tossed in for good measure won't hurt any.

The original cardboard boxes are adequate for storage in a dry environment but tend to disintegrate over time in a damp one. Won't hurt the ammo any though.

HankB
August 1, 2006, 01:39 PM
I use surplus GI ammo cans, and toss in a packet of silica gel.

TallPine
August 1, 2006, 02:36 PM
I bought 1000 rounds .22 and 500 rounds 9mm,how to store safely home?
well, i woudn't worry about it until you buy large quantities :p

i tend to spread it out rather than all in one place. every now and then, i find some ammo that i didn't even know that i had ;)

ilbob
August 1, 2006, 02:59 PM
It is a good idea to put them in a secure place, especially if you have kids around. they get into anything that is laying around that they can.

A locked closet or chest, or filing cabinet is quite adequate.

I was going to make an ammo storage cabinet out of plywood and went to get some and realized I could a kit for less then the plywood would have cost me. All I did was reinforce the shelf supports and add a padlock hasp. It won't keep anyone out who seriously wants in, but it will discourage the casual nosy person.

Zero_DgZ
August 1, 2006, 03:03 PM
Another second for the ammo cans. I rough up and then repaint 'em with OD rust-oleum (the ones I get need a new coat of paint anyway, usually) then stencil them with the rough contents: 9 mil, 12 ga., &c.

Ammo cans are cheap, durable, waterproof (until they rust through), tough as nails, and good for all kinds of things like impromptu use as a BGA or a counterweight for something...

HerrWolfe
August 1, 2006, 03:03 PM
Surplus (and waterproof:D) ammo can for $3 or pitch into your sock drawer (which should be dry); three bricks...yeah, it'll fit fine.

CB900F
August 1, 2006, 03:05 PM
Loonie;

I sell safes, and I'm gonna tell you do not store your ammo in a safe. If for any reason the ammo should ignite, the safe will become a bomb. If you don't like the ammo can idea, get a sheet metal, or plastic, shelved storage cabinet & use that. Most of them have a provision to lock. What's more important, they won't contain the gases of ammo burning & raise the internal pressure into bomb status.

900F

countertop
August 1, 2006, 03:43 PM
well, i woudn't worry about it until you buy large quantities

+1


Why would you worry about sticking <$100 worth of ammo in a safe???

Heck, I blow through that much in a single range session.

JohnBT
August 1, 2006, 05:22 PM
how to store ammo?

I have 10 or 12 ammo cans, but most of my ammo is in Rubbermaid storage tubs under the bed. Well, there were a few cases of Wolf .22 that didn't fit, so they're over in the corner with a case of .38 Sp. match wadcutters and a few flats of 28 ga. shells. Oh, and a bunch of 3" 12 ga. Hevi-Shot I got a deal on.

I think I need more tubs and a bigger bed.

John

Justin
August 1, 2006, 05:26 PM
I'll agree that surplus ammo cans are the way to go. Easy to carry, stackable, and cheap.

Even if they're a bit rusty, it's easy to rehab them in about fifteen minutes with some sandpaper and a can of Krylon.

Silver Bullet
August 1, 2006, 05:45 PM
If for any reason the ammo should ignite, the safe will become a bomb.
Could you elaborate on this, please ? We’ve had numerous threads here that concluded that ammunition will not “shoot” in a fire unless they’re the single cartridge loaded in a firearm in the barrel position. That is, the unloaded cartridge would just heat up and harmlessly push the bullet out. Since there’s no barrel, there’s no acceleration imparted to the bullet. Once the bullet clears the case, the gases expand in all directions.

I’m guessing you’re saying that if a lot of cartridges heat up simultaneously in a relatively airtight container that the container will eventually explode from all the expanding gasses.

I think my ammo cans are much more airtight than my safe.

What you’re saying kinda bugs me. One of the reasons I have ammo in a safe is to avoid liability if some kids were to find the ammo and do something uncalled for.

odysseus
August 1, 2006, 07:54 PM
+1 on surplus ammo cans. Make sure the rubber seal around the lid is good. It's better to have them in manageable containers.

CB900F
August 1, 2006, 09:55 PM
Silver;

How does a bomb work? Explosives are ignited in a sealed container, not so? If you're ammo is stored in a container that may be exposed to conditions that will heat the ammo to ignition temperature, and the container has a blow out panel, or is of light enough construction to rupture easily, there will be a venting of high temperature gasses. However, if the container indeed contains until gas pressure rises to cause catastrophic failure, that would seem to fit most definitions of bomb IMHO.

Ever made a sparkler bomb? Same principle.

900F

Silver Bullet
August 1, 2006, 10:54 PM
Sounds like you're confirming what I said in my second paragraph. Are most safes that airtight ? Mine has holes to allow bolting to the floor, and some have holes to allow a goldenrod power cord.

I understand the principle, I just never heard of this happening with ammo in a safe.

Thank you for your reply, though. And I prefer milk with chili. :)

loonie
August 2, 2006, 01:35 AM
it seems i have to go buy a metal cabinet to store my ammo. because in canada,by law,ammo has to be stored in a locked constructed container.....

anyway,thanks to all posters above!

geekWithA.45
August 2, 2006, 09:49 AM
I'm sceptical on the ammo safe becoming a bomb proposition.

Unlike black powder, modern propellants do NOT explode in open air. They burn rapidly, and there is a difference.

Laying aside how ammo would ignite in a closed safe, and continue combustion without a fresh air supply, I'd think that a lot of ammo burning in a room would be just about as catastrophic as that same amount of ammo burning in a safe.

3 possibilities exist:

1) The safe would contain the expanded gases, which would then sublimate out slowly.

2) The expanding gases would find their way out of whatever air channels it could find, in a hot jet.

3) The safe would fail at it's weakest point, and "blow out" there. I doubt that this would become anything like a schrapnel bomb.

aguyindallas
August 2, 2006, 10:20 AM
I previously had a Homak locking gun cabinet. Its the cheap, thin steel that has two locks on it. Holds about 8 long guns and has a small shelf at the top. When I upgraded to a regular Residential Security Container (read: Gun Safe), I took my gold old Homak out to the garage.

I simply cut some 1x4 to make legs for inside the safe and cut some plywood to be the shelves. Now, I have a locking ammo container. My climate in the North Texas area is fairly dry, so I dont have too much in the way of moisture to worry about.

Works great and it is about a $100.00 investment that will go a long way.

usp9
August 2, 2006, 10:47 AM
I sell safes, and I'm gonna tell you do not store your ammo in a safe. If for any reason the ammo should ignite, the safe will become a bomb. If you don't like the ammo can idea, get a sheet metal, or plastic, shelved storage cabinet & use that. Most of them have a provision to lock. What's more important, they won't contain the gases of ammo burning & raise the internal pressure into bomb status.



...between a ammo can and a safe? By your definition they are both bombs. I do keep my ammo in a safe for the obvious reasons. They are locked up, away from mischievious hands. A safe isn't as portable or easy to open. I use one of the less expensive, $79 Wal Mart 8 guns safe, that I put shelves in to hold the several thousand rounds I usually have on hand. Works great.

While my safe is not fireproof, should my home catch fire, my guns and ammo will be low on the priority list.

pete f
August 2, 2006, 11:16 AM
I still wonder why he has to make special arrangments for a weeks worth of ammo.

aguyindallas
August 2, 2006, 12:13 PM
I still wonder why he has to make special arrangments for a weeks worth of ammo.

:D :D :D

Cosmoline
August 2, 2006, 12:20 PM
Modern centerfire ammo is incredibly durable. I've left unprotected boxes of .38 Special in snow drifts all winter, then found them with their cardboard melted off in the spring, rounds laying on the ground. All of those fired without a hitch. Ammo cans work well, but don't get too worked up about the stuff.

Wes Janson
August 2, 2006, 12:36 PM
The only way I can see to get a safe to explode would be if it were completely airtight, and all of the cartridges managed to touch off, raising internal pressure a whole lot. But I just don't see how it would fail explosively.

Moondoggie
August 2, 2006, 02:23 PM
I use a defunct side by side refrigerator/freezer with the shelves reinforced for the additional weight to store most of my ammo and reloading components.

I drilled a hole in each side and carriage bolted a length of heavy chain from each side that locks in the center underneath the handles on the doors to keep the average person out. This arrangement was my first gun safe when I still had a kid at home. When I was able to afford a real safe, the fridge became ammo storage only. Empty nest = more disposable income..funny how that works!

It's nice to have the light come on in my ammo storage cabinet whenever I open the door! :neener:

Soybomb
August 2, 2006, 04:05 PM
I can only speak for my safe, but with the 1/2" for the cord for a dehumidifier and the air space around the door I'm reasonably confident there is no way it could ever build pressure. A sealed ammo can could definately build pressure...enough to be dangerous, I don't know. I imagine it would fail long before much pressure was built.

Cosmoline
August 2, 2006, 05:41 PM
Somebody needs to email Jamie and Adam. I don't believe the exploding safe myth for a second, but I DO want to see them detonate a safe. :D

BrainOnSigs
August 2, 2006, 05:58 PM
I'm such an ammo whore I had to buy another full size safe for my ammo. I could fill several pallets. :what:

Ala Dan
August 2, 2006, 06:36 PM
I've got many boxes of centerfire ammo stored in the bottom of my RSC,
adding lots of weight in case a thief comes while I'm sleeping~!!:uhoh: :D

Mannlicher
August 2, 2006, 07:15 PM
loonie, thats not enough ammo to worry about. Just put it on a shelf in the closet. Whats that? About a shoebox full?

CB900F
August 2, 2006, 09:04 PM
For the skeptics;

If you container is not rated as a safe, but is the typical RSC box, not too much worry. As has been stated, these boxes have holes, loose doors, & can therefore vent, relieving pressure.

However, to assume that all safes are like your 'safe', is fuzzy thinking at best. True safes don't have holes in them, as it's exceedingly hard to meet the U.L. burglary and fire ratings with holes in the safe. Many good safes also have intumescent seals on the door that expand under heat, to keep the gasses of a fire out of the interior & help seal against the exterior temperature rise.

But, if worse did come to worst, and under extreme circumstances, the ammo in this sealed enviroment did cook off, I don't want to be anywhere near it. Normal housefire, the chances are very low that the interior would get hot enough to damage the interior papers, let alone cook off ammo. But, somebody lives next to the bulk plant, don't they? So 600,000 gallons of petroleum can't ignite? All that flaming liquid wouldn't dare come over to your place? Of course not, you'd sue!

I'm just pointing out worst case scenario. All the rest of you that want to chance burning ammo in there with your guns, go right ahead & store in the RSC. I'm not your insurance agent, I don't care. I will feel sorry for the poor defenseless guns though.

900F

loonie
August 3, 2006, 01:36 AM
sorry,I am so stupid,what does RSC stand for?:o

EZ CZ75
August 3, 2006, 04:34 AM
I believed that Loonie said he lives in Canadia and that the laws require him to keep the ammo locked up. It may only be a shoebox full, but you can't fault a guy for trying to follow the law, no matter how stupid they may be.

loonie
August 3, 2006, 05:12 AM
I believed that Loonie said he lives in Canadia and that the laws require him to keep the ammo locked up. It may only be a shoebox full, but you can't fault a guy for trying to follow the law, no matter how stupid they may be.


that's true,storing ammo in a locked container is bylaw in canada.

BIGDADDYLONGSTROKE
August 3, 2006, 07:05 AM
RSC=Residential Security Container.


Personally I store my ammo that is in the mags In the fire safe with the firearms, if a fire happens in my home I will be more worried about getting wife out before it gets hot enough to cook off the ammo, and as for the rest of the ammo its in its card board boxes on top of the safe or in the closet I dont have a garage (apartment life) and I will be sure to notify the police and fire crew on scene that there is a quantity of ammo in and around my fire safe. Im sure they have probably dealt with that sort of thing before.

Im not trying to say other people's ways are wrong, just my way of doing things. To each his own I guess.

Colt
August 3, 2006, 02:08 PM
if a fire happens in my home I will be more worried about getting wife out before it gets hot enough to cook off the ammo

Here's a question for you. When you evacuate your house, and the firedepartment arrives, will you inform them of the ammo and your safe?

On one hand, you would want to warn them that there is an extremely heavy object on the second floor (in my case) that may eventually be on the first floor, or in the basement. You'd also want them to be aware of the ammo. Their safety is paramount, and I'd probably say something.

On the other hand, I'd hate to have them say "whoa!" and keep their distance, letting the place burn down. Especially if the fire wasn't bad enough to warrant such a reaction. Now, instead of doing everything in the power to control the fire, they might take a hands-off approach, allowing everything to be destroyed. Yes, I have insurance. I also have quite a few things that money can't replace.

loonie
August 3, 2006, 03:06 PM
thanks

BIGDADDYLONGSTROKE
August 3, 2006, 06:28 PM
If you read my post all the way through you will see that I stated that I would be sure to notify police and fire crews on scene that there is a quantity of ammo in around my fire safe. I hope that cleared that up for you.

possum
August 3, 2006, 10:27 PM
In the closet!:)

chaim
August 3, 2006, 10:40 PM
I agree with the others that you don't really have enough ammo to worry about keeping locked up. I have quite a bit of 12ga, 7.62x39, .223/5.56, 9mm, .40 and .45 right now (well, not a lot compared to many here, but a couple thousand rounds) and I just have the boxes in larger cardboard boxes to keep it all organized and in one place (or actually in two places). However, if you are in a location that requires you keep it locked up, just buy a cheap footlocker, file cabinet with lock, lockable file box, etc. as you don't really need much for that much ammo (heck, if you don't have a gun locker or gun safe yet, get one of those gun lockers that has locked shelves on one side and the gun locker on the other and take care of both needs at once- something like this (http://www.stack-on.com/securityplus/gun_security/gcd-9216-5.html)).

cassandrasdaddy
August 3, 2006, 10:41 PM
because of the tight seal on a good safe door it takes surprisingly lil explosion on inside to open one. there is a trick called a water hammer a roomate taught me. drikk hole in safe fill with water insert small explosive charge through hole use a lead expansion anchor to seal hole boom water doesn't compress make boom more efficent dor opens and very quietly

trickyasafox
August 3, 2006, 11:42 PM
i keep it all organized on teh second shelf of my loading bench. i am the youngest person in the house (22). it's just easier to pack it and store it so close together. and the safe is about 10 feet behind me with some ammo as well

loonie
August 6, 2006, 01:48 AM
today I bought a RSC box for 90 dollars:D STACK-ON thanks to all posters!

Mannlicher
August 6, 2006, 06:30 PM
I believed that Loonie said he lives in Canadia and that the laws require him to keep the ammo locked up. It may only be a shoebox full, but you can't fault a guy for trying to follow the law, no matter how stupid they may be.

Loonie, sorry about the shoebox comment. I had no idea you are Canadian, and have to follow a law to requiring you to lock up ammo.

Let me tell you what I do, and I see you have already done about the same. I use the cheap Stackon safes, the ones with the single barrel key lock. I frame it inside with 1 X 4 and fit in two shelves. I put the heavy stuff on the bottom, and stack the smaller quantities on the shelves. Cost is minimal, and you can really pack a lot in one of those.

Lupinus
August 6, 2006, 06:35 PM
it just gets stacked on the top shelf of the safe. Ammo is pretty stable stuff and if there is the event where it might go off outside of your firearms, such as say cooking off in a fire, chances are you aren't gonna be in the area of it anyway and if so you will have bigger problems then ammo cooking off....like say your skin doing the same.

Also remember that if ammo were to just go off it isn't going to sent the bullet going for hundreds or more yards, it will expload IMO go a few yards along with pieces of the case doing the same. Dangerous if you were to throw it into a camp fire, but agian not much so if it is a situation where you'd have to worry about it cause you'd likly either be out of there already.

stevelyn
August 7, 2006, 08:18 AM
I store mine on open shelves.

Ammo in a fire = POP!.........Fffffffffffft.
No flying shrapnel. No explosion other than the primer.

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