Florida gun laws about to change


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armedpolak
August 9, 2006, 04:14 PM
So are Florida gun laws about to change? Or do you guys think they should stick around?

For all you FL residents, how do you feel? What is the attitude after almost 20 years of "shall issue" CCW and decreasing crimerates? Are there libs screaming for gun conviscations?

I'm planing to move down there from NYC, and I would hate to have the laws change week after I move in to my new home :eek:

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Jkwas
August 9, 2006, 04:28 PM
I doubt anything will change, if anything, the laws regarding ccw will only become less restrictive. People here have come to accept it as part of everyday life. It's great!

joab
August 9, 2006, 04:33 PM
We just hit our record breaking 37th murder yesterday and I still have not heard any anti propaganda about guns being the cause.

Our gun laws are definitely easing up over the past few years, but I do wonder what a new administration will do with that trend

pharmer
August 9, 2006, 04:35 PM
joab, look at the murder locations. Parramore and Pine Hills count for about90%. Joe

AirForceShooter
August 9, 2006, 04:51 PM
depends on where in Florida you're moving. I moved here from NYC and found out just how big this place is.
If you're looking at Dade, West Palm area you might as well stay in NYC.
If you're coming to the west coast you're good to go. If you're going to the panhandle it's redneck land ( that's meant in a good way).

No politician is going to try to change any gun laws except the one's from around Miami. And that's just to keep the former NYer's happy.

Just take your time buying. Prices are falling.

AFS

Billy_H
August 9, 2006, 04:56 PM
If I were to comment on any change in the future it would be about for the better. A lot has been happening recently to make the state even more firearm friendly. :D

dimitri
August 9, 2006, 05:11 PM
There are three Floridas; very "liberal" south Florida where the media shows a high anti-gun bias and the police use the excuse of "many gangs" to search randomly vehicles, central Florida, which happens to have the most gun ranges but it also has the Disney mentality "guns scare tourists", and ultra-conservative west Florida which has the most CCW permits per capita. Even here the media is anti-gun biased; two recent (in the last 5 days) reports on the only local TV station, channel 3, show that.
One local gun club (Escambia River Muzzle Loaders) wants to move the gun range further north in Escambia Co. close to a small town called Century. Channel 3 concentrated on 2 Century residents who oppose the noise a gun range would bring. Never asked the local shops (who are in favor of the range) how they feel, or mentioned that 22% of the ERML members live in the north part of the county. Never mentioned that ERML held three drives in the last 24 months (state-side depandants of overseas military, food for hurricane displaced disabled war veterants in Pascagoula (MS), and toys for "Kathreena's littlest victims".
In a second report; the evening after a gun show closed in Pensacola channel 3 reported that the police in Destin were called by patrons of a local motel when they noticed an SUV full of guns (the fact that the guns were in the manufacturers' boxes and many had plastic ties around the action did not seem to be important) so the news implied (never actually said it) that this could have been some kind of illegal gun dealing.
The present governor and attorney general have been very pro-guns; who knows who will be elected in November.

tegemu
August 9, 2006, 05:32 PM
I live in No. East Fla, right near Jacksonville. Gun laws are very much alive and well here. If anything, I forsee more laws to the better. In the last couple of weeks, our Governor, Jeb Bush, publically stated that a contributing factor to the strong drop in violent crime in Fla, ( Down somewhere near 30%)was the law abiding citizens carrying firearms, or words to that effect.

bamawrx
August 9, 2006, 05:38 PM
Not to steal the thread, but I hope they do move the gun club as it will be much closer to me. :D

Not that it will matter soon as work is starting on my own private range.

Yes Florida is great gun wise. Only thing better about FL than my AL is they allow SBR's and the CCW permit is also better too.

Glock_10mm
August 9, 2006, 06:53 PM
The laws have gotten better in the past few years with the "shoot first ask questions later policy" recently adopted for self defense. Basically if you feel threatenedyou have cart blanche to defend yourself, your property, others, or even your car! Good luck finding that in any other state. I know Florida was a test pilot for the program to become a multi state policy. Florida seems to be giving more rights to the CCW'ers and less to the criminals...I love it!

PS - Dimitri doesnt have it completely right but the trend is similar. The rules of the "Liberal" south florida mostly apply in the big cities like Ft Lauderdale and Miami city limits, but not in the small ones like mine or the counties from my knoweledge. It varies at the city level. Also, there are plenty of ranges down here, Markham Park being a prime outdoor example with a trap gauntlet in Davie, and most ranges I've been to have full auto and suppressed weapons for rent. Though there are deffinately more ranges in Orlando! I've lived in Jacksonville NEFL, Orlando CEFL, and Boca Raton SEFL, and everywhere I've been has been gun friendly and I havn't had a problem.

10MMGary
August 9, 2006, 07:31 PM
Glock 10MM wrote; :uhoh:
The laws have gotten better in the past few years with the "shoot first ask questions later policy" recently adopted for self defense. Basically if you feel threatenedyou have cart blanche to defend yourself, your property, others, or even your car!

I hope no one is taking this statement with any seriousness. This would be a costly mistake and will land one in jail for a long long time:banghead: . There is no such law as "Shoot first ask later" The recent law past doen't allow anything of the sort. Our gun laws are better than most but still impede the individuals
2nd amendment rights.

candr44
August 9, 2006, 09:24 PM
I doubt anything will change. The attorney general, Charlie Crist, is campaigning for govenor and he has campaigned at several gun shows. Based on his past elections, I would say he is most likely going to win.

Mannlicher
August 9, 2006, 09:32 PM
I believe its 5 new pro gun laws go into effect in October. We are on a roll.

joab
August 9, 2006, 09:46 PM
The laws have gotten better in the past few years with the "shoot first ask questions later policy" recently adopted for self defense. Basically if you feel threatenedyou have cart blanche to defend yourself, your property, others, or even your car! Good luck finding that in any other state.Good luck finding that in this state.
Please research the law before you start spreading the anti-gunners propaganda for them

The new law changed nothing but the requirement that you show that you had no retreat.
You still have to show that you had no other choice than to shoot, if it can be proved that you could have retreated easier than shooting then the law will not work for you

starbuck
August 9, 2006, 10:40 PM
joab, I disagree with your interpretation of the new law.
The new law states clearly that a person: has no duty to retreat and has the right to stand his or her ground and meet force with force, including deadly force if he or she reasonably believes it is necessary to do so to prevent death or great bodily harm to himself or herself or another or to prevent the commission of a forcible felony.

Whether or not you could have retreated without using force is irrelevant under the new law, as you are no longer obligated to try.

Wes Janson
August 9, 2006, 10:43 PM
All television/print media in this state is full of stupidity and anti-gun bias (except, technically speaking, the Florida Gun News mini-magazine). It's just how the media is these days. Stupidity is rampant everywhere, as it has always been since the dawn of Man. The good news is that the News doesn't seem to be preventing our laws from changing for the (marginally) better.

cbsbyte
August 9, 2006, 10:49 PM
Flordia is still considered a swing state. In that half the voter vote for one major party or the other. The heavly populated areas are more traditional Democrat, while the more rural areas are conservative. I have some relatives that live in the western and Orlando area, and they are all transplants from the NE. They are old fashion Democrat to the bone, and so are their childern who now live in the state. They said their areas are becoming more Democrat. Counties are becoming more purple do the recent imports from the Northeast and Mid-Alantic states. The state could easily be solid Democrat again in ten years.

surfinUSA
August 9, 2006, 10:53 PM
You may not have a duty to retreat but you still must be in fear for your life or that of another.

The new laws did nothing to change the requirement that it must be reasonable and necessary to shoot your assailant.

You don't have to retreat but you still must use only that force reasonably necessary to defend yourself. You can still only use deadly force to defeat an attack that is likely to cause death or great bodily harm to yourself or another.

joab
August 9, 2006, 11:29 PM
The new law states clearly that a person: has no duty to retreat and has the right to stand his or her ground and meet force with force, including deadly force if he or she reasonably believes it is necessary to do so to prevent death or great bodily harm to himself or herself or another or to prevent the commission of a forcible felony.

Whether or not you could have retreated without using force is irrelevant under the new law, as you are no longer obligated to try.

This is from a well credentialed law professor, Anthony Sebok (http://writ.news.findlaw.com/sebok/), ho although adamantly against the law still understands that it is not a shoot first ask questions later kill with total impunity law
Previously, all Lisa had to do to win her case was argue that she honestly and reasonably believed that she could not retreat safely. Now, she has to argue, instead -- somewhat similarly -- that she reasonably believed that if she didn't use deadly force, Bob imminently would.

Under either standard, Lisa still has the burden of proof to justify her killing. Also, under either standard, the jury may disbelieve her if there are witnesses around to contradict her story.

You don't have to retreat but you still must use only that force reasonably necessary to defend yourselfAnd if you have a reasonable avenue of retreat the use of deadly force may be found to be unreasonable.
While you have no duty to retreat that does not necessarily mean that you can be excused for not taking advantage of a reasonable escape route

starbuck
August 10, 2006, 12:10 AM
I still disagree with you. I understand your perspective though.
That professor's legal opinion does not appear to be how the law is being applied.
On a side note, here's article from the Florida Times-Union about the effects of the new law. It's nice to see a press report that doesn't blatantly paint it as being an utter disaster.
http://www.jacksonville.com/tu-online/stories/071006/met_22294481.shtml

MarkDido
August 10, 2006, 09:10 AM
I have yet to see a breakdown on the 37+ murders,

Were 37 innocent prople killed? Was it gang related, was it criminal-on-criminal crime?

The stats can be skewed to fit an agenda. Kind of like the Brady Bunch considering anyone under the age of 19 to be a "child" when they talk about all the "children" being killed by guns.

Jkwas
August 10, 2006, 09:14 AM
almost all the gun violence I see on our local news is gang vs gang, and in certain areas that are prone to it. Lake Worth and West Palm Beach primarily.

avmech
August 10, 2006, 10:03 AM
Don't forget Riviera Beach

03Shadowbob
August 10, 2006, 10:26 AM
Like has been said before in this thread, the big cities like Miami and Fort Lauderdale are probably most liberal however there are still a lot of us "Florida Crackers" that haven't gone anywhere and we all remember the good ole days when most of it down here was "redneck territory" and full of swamps.
I live west of West Palm Beach and I believe most of us are still pretty conservative and gun-toters.
We have pretty good gun laws down here but it seems like all of our outdoor gun ranges are gone thanks to the rapidly growing population.
I don't see any bad changes on the horizon in Florida.

Mannlicher
August 10, 2006, 10:30 AM
http://www.cnn.com/ELECTION/2004/pages/results/states/FL/P/00/map.html

This is the breakdown on Florida for the last Presidential election. Note that the only areas that went for Skerry were the Leon county area,(where FSU is located), Alachua County (UF is there), and that strip full of transplanted yankees on the south East coast, IE, Volusia, Palm Beach and Broward Counties, and of course, South America, IE Dade County.
Bush pulled 52% of the total vote, and Skerry got 47%. (Nader took the other 1%).
For this to happen, means that virtually everyone in Florida, not living in those few Dem strongholds, voted for the GOP.
The governor and both houses of the legislator are controlled by the GOP. Hardly a 'swing state', with the outcome in doubt.

BrainOnSigs
August 10, 2006, 10:56 AM
From 7/6/06:


TO: USF & NRA Members and Friends
FROM: Marion P. Hammer
NRA Past President
Executive Director Unified Sportsmen of Florida

We are very pleased to tell you that yesterday, Governor Jeb Bush (R) signed into law, SIX pro-gun and pro-hunting bills supported by NRA and Unified Sportsmen of Florida. That is a record number of major pro-gun & and pro-hunting bills passed in a single Florida legislative session under any Senate President or Speaker of the House and signed in one ceremony by any Governor in Florida.

Special thanks go to Senate President Tom Lee (R-10) and House Speaker Allan Bense (R-6) for their extraordinary help in passing these six bills to restore rights and freedoms to law-abiding firearms owners in Florida. The individual sponsors and co-sponsors of these bills deserve our gratitude for their efforts on our behalf.

We simply could not have done this without your help. Your work and responsiveness to our alerts and in sending email and making phone calls to legislators in support of these great bills made the difference. Thank you for answering freedom's call. These are the bills YOU HELPED PASS:

(1) HB-125 Hunter Voter Bill

A bill to make it easier for hunters and fishermen to register to vote. Passed the Florida Legislature 4/28/06.

HB-125 Sponsored by Representative Greg Evers (R-Milton) in the House and Senator Carey Baker (R-Eustis) in the Senate will offer people who buy resident hunting and fishing licenses three new opportunities to register to vote.

1. People who purchase a hunting or fishing license by phone will have the opportunity to have a voter registration form mailed to them.

2. People who purchase a hunting or fishing license online will have a link that takes them to a voter registration site.

3. People who purchase a hunting or fishing license from an agent authorized to sell hunting and fishing licenses, will be asked if they would like a voter registration application to take home and fill out and mail in later.

The bill passed the House 110-6 and passed the Senate 31-8. Signed into law by Governor Bush on 6/7/06.


(2) HB-265 No-Net-Loss of Hunting Lands

A bill to protect hunting lands and our hunting heritage. Passed the Florida Legislature 5/4/06.

HB-265 Sponsored by Representative Don Brown (R-DeFuniak Springs) in the House and Senator Nancy Argenziano (R-Crystal River) in the Senate does the following:

1. Establishes a baseline number of acres of public hunting lands, equal to the number of acres open for hunting on the effective date of this act.

2. Requires the Florida Wildlife & Conservation Commission (FWC) to find replacement hunting lands for any public hunting lands that are closed in the future so the number of hunting acres does not fall below the base line.

3. Requires FWC to try to find replacement hunting lands in the same region as the lost acreage and to the extent possible, allow the same type of hunting as was allowed on the closed land.

4. Requires state agencies and water management districts to assist and cooperate with FWC and allow hunting on lands they manage if the land is suitable for hunting. However, state parks are excluded from lands that may be used for replacement lands.

The bill passed the House 118-0 and passed the Senate 40-0. Signed into law by Governor Bush on 6/7/06.

(3) HB-285 No Confiscation of Firearms During Emergencies

A bill to prohibit confiscation of firearms following hurricanes (such as was done in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina). Passed the Florida Legislature 5/3/06.

HB-285 Sponsored by Representative Mitch Needelman (R-Melbourne) in the House and Senators Carey Baker (R-Eustis) and Bill Posey (R-Rockledge) in the Senate does the following:

1. Amends the Emergency Management Powers Act to prohibit the governor from ordering or authorizing the seizure, taking, or confiscation of firearms that are lawfully possessed, unless a person is engaged in a criminal act.

2. Amends the Emergency Management Powers Act to prohibit any public official from ordering or authorizing the seizure, taking, or confiscation of firearms that are lawfully possessed, unless a person is engaged in a criminal act.

The bill passed the House 116-0 and passed the Senate 40-0. Signed into law by Governor Bush on 6/7/06.

(4) HB-687 Public Records Exemption of CCW License Holders Information

A bill to protect the privacy rights of concealed weapons and firearms license holders Passed the Florida Legislature 5/2/06

HB-687 Sponsored by Representative Sandy Adams (R-Orlando) in the House and Senator Mike Haridopolis (R-Melbourne) in the Senate does the following:

1. Exempts the personal identifying information (names, addresses, birth dates, social security numbers, phone numbers, & license numbers) contained in records maintained by the Division of Licensing of DOACS of individuals who have applied for or received licenses to carry concealed weapons or firearms.

2. Makes the data available to law enforcement for law enforcement purposes.

3. Stops harassment of license holders by the media. Protects license holders from identity theft, stalkers, domestic violence abusers and thieves.

In the past the media have posted names, addresses, birth dates, and other personal identifying information on websites and have printed them in newspapers. Such reckless conduct subjects license holders to possible identity theft, theft of firearms by criminals and tells domestic violence abusers and stalkers where to find victims who have moved to hide themselves and their children from these predators.

The bill passed the House 83-27 and passed the Senate 37-2. Signed into law by Governor Bush on 6/7/06.

(5) HB-1029 Firearms in National Forests & State Parks

A bill to restore the right to possess firearms for self-defense and other lawful purposes while in National Forests and State Parks in Florida. Passed the Florida Legislature 5/2/06.

HB-1029 Sponsored by Representative Dennis Baxley (R-Ocala) in the House and Senator Bill Posey (R-Rockledge) in the Senate does the following:

1. Repeals the law that bans firearms in National Forests in Florida (s. 790.11, 790.12, 790.14)

2. Directs the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) to repeal its rule that bans firearms in State Parks (rule 62D-2.014(10).

3. Requires that all other applicable firearms laws be followed.

4. Requires that a new rule be formulated by DEP that allows firearms in state parks and stipulates that firearms shall at all times be in the possession of a responsible party or properly secured within or to a vehicle or temporary housing, which shall include motor homes, travel trailers, recreational vehicles, campers, tents, or other enclosed structures, while in state parks.

The law being repealed is obsolete. There are public shooting ranges in Florida's National Forests. FWC officers teach the firearms portion of Hunter Safety courses at these ranges and have been very concerned about violating this obsolete law. Further, there homes in National Forests and the old law violates their firearms rights. The DEP regulation that prohibits firearms in state parks VIOLATES state law (790.33)

The bill passed the House 90-27 and passed the Senate 31-6. Signed into law by Governor Bush on 6/7/06.

(6) SB-1290 Concealed Weapons/License Renewal for U.S. Armed Services Members

A bill to assist men and women serving on active duty in military service to our nation with renewal of their concealed weapons and firearms licenses.

SB-1290 Sponsored by Senator Mike Fasano (R-New Port Richey) in the Senate and Representative Marti Coley (R-Panama City) in the House does the following:

1. Applies only to men and women serving in the U.S. armed services, who are on active duty away from home.

2. Provides that concealed weapons and firearms licenses of such servicemembers will not expire while they are serving on military orders that have taken them away from home.

3. Extends such licenses for an additional 180 days after they return home from active duty assignment so that they may be renewed without late fees or penalties.

The bill passed the House 120-0 and passed the Senate 39-0. Signed into law by Governor Bush on 6/7/06.

Capital punishment means never having to say, "You again?"

BrainOnSigs
August 10, 2006, 11:01 AM
I love these signs that are popping up leading into my fair state.

I wish I could figure out a way to replace the word "Visitor" with "Criminal".......

http://pic18.picturetrail.com/VOL875/3165911/7400197/176323242.jpg

Tim L
August 10, 2006, 11:09 AM
I'm wondering how many refugees from New Orleans are in the areas with the high murder rates? We see what's happened in Houston, could the same be happening here?
Now, to get this back on track after the course change, come on down the laws are fine and getting better.

Tim

XDKingslayer
August 10, 2006, 11:53 AM
Florida laws aren't going to change. Us Floridians have gotten fed up with criminals, fed up with slow police responce times, and fed up with having to be a victim before we can act.

The PEOPLE of Florida asked for these laws. The PEOPLE of Florida voted them in.

We like them and they are staying that way.

mindwip
August 10, 2006, 02:57 PM
I like the Brady sign, to me it says Florida is a great state that takes no crap.


Thanks Brady, wish we had one of those in Cal

Dr. Dickie
August 10, 2006, 03:10 PM
Florida is, for the foreseeable future, going to be pro 2nd amendment.
There are just too many heavily armed gun nuts like me that are politically active and belligerent about it; now as far as our Federal senators are concerned…

Glock_10mm
August 10, 2006, 06:46 PM
Florida is a force meet force state. I am not spreading any misleading information. Even the Washington post & NY times billed it as "Shoot first ask questions later" policy. Before you attack a position, you should be aware of the policies and how cases have been treated according to the new policy (law). I've lived throughout FL (Jax Beach, East Orlando, Boca Raton) and know the laws pretty well.

Check these out and you will see why I say what I did previously:

Washington Post
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/04/25/AR2005042501553.html

NPR -> And their liberal!
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=4627356

BBC
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/4415135.stm

LAW.com
http://www.law.com/jsp/article.jsp?id=1116246912951

NYtimes
http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/07/us/07shoot.html?_r=2&ei=5087%0A&en=30d77f6590ae4aa7&ex=1155096000&pagewanted=all&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

ceetee
August 10, 2006, 06:57 PM
http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g34/cottontail001/7c98dfad.jpg

joab
August 10, 2006, 08:55 PM
Even the Washington post & NY times billed it as "Shoot first ask questions later" policyNot exactlyOpponents call them “shoot first” laws.
That was the only reference to "Shoot First I Ask Questions Later" that I found
I'm not sure what you are trying to accomplish with these links.
It doesn't take a lot of reading comprehension to see that they have a definite slant against the law.
With all there rhetoric they keep coming back to the main point, or rather glossing over it
any person "has the right to stand his or her ground and meet force with force, including deadly force if he or she reasonably believes it is necessary to do so to prevent death or great bodily harm."
And if retreat is reasonably available then it is no longer necessary, I can't see how that is hard to understand.

You have taken the bait
The argument was never that it was good that we could shoot first with minimal provocation.
The antis and Brady Bunch made that the argument and instead of saying that that is not what the law is about some cheered that it was about time.
Now when some yokel who gets his law education from mainstream newspapers shoots someone because Sarah told him he could they will have the ammo they need, that along with slanted stories of those that have had to use the law in their favor will help them fill their collection plates.

So to refute my argument that we should not help spread the propaganda of the antis you provide links from media sources with obvious ant leanings to support the propaganda you are helping to spread.
Living in Fla means nothing if your are getting your education from Washington and New York.

Talk to Sergeants with the local county Sheriff's dept, lawyers with the public defenders office and a police chief and sheriff or two as I have done and then come tell me that I should make myself aware of policies and how cases have been treated.

There is a tow truck driver being prosecuted for murder because he thought that he could shoot first and ask questions later. He wasn't the one asking the questions though. The DA was and didn't like his answers

Alex45ACP
August 10, 2006, 10:33 PM
http://pic18.picturetrail.com/VOL875/3165911/7400197/176323242.jpg

Where can I find one of these signs? I want to get a picture of myself heavily armed in front of one :D

waterlady501
August 16, 2006, 08:12 PM
Quoted from Dimitri: "One local gun club (Escambia River Muzzle Loaders) wants to move the gun range further north in Escambia Co. close to a small town called Century. Channel 3 concentrated on 2 Century residents who oppose the noise a gun range would bring. Never asked the local shops (who are in favor of the range) how they feel, or mentioned that 22% of the ERML members live in the north part of the county. Never mentioned that ERML held three drives in the last 24 months (state-side depandants of overseas military, food for hurricane displaced disabled war veterants in Pascagoula (MS), and toys for "Kathreena's littlest victims"."

While I agree with your assertion that local media is generally anti-gun, the above example simply is misleading. #1--The site for the proposed gun range is not just 'near a small town' but is, in fact, in the middle of a residential area that includes a church and an elementary school. #2--One of the residents interviewed is an 84-year old widow who lives on property which is surrounded on 2 sides by the proposed range. #3--Which local shops are in favor of the range? The only business nearby is a convenience store. Who cares if the businesses in the town of Century are in favor of it? The noise from the range certainly won't carry 4 miles which is at least the distance to the nearest 'shop' in Century. #4--22% of the club members live in the north end of the county. How many of them live within 2 miles of the proposed range? Zero. #5--Whatever charitable events the club sponsored is irrelevant to the issue at hand. I belong to a military family and many of our members volunteered with disaster relief immediately following both Ivan and Katrina. That doesn't give us the right to construct a firing range in a residential area. Finally, we are fiercely in favor of the rights of private citizens to own firearms. We own plenty of them ourselves. We moved here knowing we would, from time to time, hear the sounds of gunfire in the woods during hunting season. That is a far cry from what is proposed by the gun club who by their own admission plan to have the facility open to their 800 members seven days a week year round.

PX15
August 17, 2006, 11:54 AM
FWIT Dept:

Basically the same "no duty to retreat" law went into effect here in Georgia in July 2006. Ga & Fla recognize each other's concealed carry permits also.


My theory for self defense in the home is: NEVER shoot anybody for any reason OTHER than in defense of your life, or the life of your loved ones or other innocent persons.

My wife and I are senior citizens. We aren't as sharp as we once were, but we are far from stupid.. Therefore:

I am more than willing to retreat until "the cows come home" if that will prevent me from taking a life.. A bg can steal my possessions and safely walk away. I personally just will not take a person's life over possessions.

Having said that, I am very pleased the State of Georgia has firearms legislation allowing me to protect myself, those I love, and even strangers in harms way when I simply have no other choice..

For example, if someone breaks into our home, IF WE CAN, my wife and I have a plan. Our plan is to retreat into the master bedroom. We will lock the door and she will further retreat into the bathroom with her trusty Ruger Security Six 357 mag. and her cell phone. She will lock the door. She will dial 911 for help..... Anybody breaking down the bathroom door will be subject to 6 rds. of SJHP' Cor-Bons. And, my wife can shoot....

If my wife hears a firearm discharging she will NOT come out until reassured by myself, or leo's that she is safe. She will not put down her revolver until she is positive she is safe.

I will squat behind our bed with my High Standard 12ga pump riot shotgun loaded with #4 buckshot. I will point the shotgun at the bedroom door and at the first sign of anyone approaching the door I will call out that I am armed with a shotgun and LEO's have been called..

I will do nothing more until help arrives and proves who "They are" and assures me all is safe.

On the off chance that the bg choses to break down my bedroom door I have no choice but to fall back on plan b.

Plan B.. Shoot the sucker coming thru the door.
Oh yeah, we have another plan in case someone tries to break in our home and we can't get to the rear bedroom.. We'll just keep that to ourselves.

Best Wishes,

JP

sw460mag
August 17, 2006, 12:03 PM
this is texas ,anyone comes after us they die.we do not run . my wheelchair is to slow anyway:evil: :cuss: :cuss: :cuss: :banghead:

greenflash107
August 17, 2006, 05:31 PM
PX15, I agree with you on almost everything. I to would hate to have to kill someone, but, if they come through my door or window or whatever, they are going to leave feet first. If someone needs something I have, all they have to do is ask me and I'll give it to them. It's my family that I won't take any chances with. I also live in GA and do like the fact that other states around us, FL, ALA, TN, N.C and S.C. recognize our CCW.

PX15
August 17, 2006, 05:44 PM
greenflash107:

I didn't think South Carolina recognized Ga. cc permits..

Is that a recent change?

Thanks,

J. Pomeroy

greenflash107
August 17, 2006, 06:09 PM
PX15, don't know if new or not, but have been told that by several Law (highway troopers) county law. I really need to look up to make sure. I live in N.W. GA and was told that I could carry into any of the surrounding States. But, as I said. I really need to find out to be sure. How old is your info?

greenflash107
August 17, 2006, 06:21 PM
Hey PX15. jumped onto Google and first couple of links said that GA was not on S.C. list of recognized states for CCW. Did say that there was a special permit that a S.C. could get (or vise, versa). I am glad you said something, because every once in a blue moon I do have to go into S.C. I don't like the idea of having to buy a second permit just for the one state though. Do you know anything about that?

Stauble
August 17, 2006, 06:45 PM
Like has been said before in this thread, the big cities like Miami and Fort Lauderdale are probably most liberal however there are still a lot of us "Florida Crackers" that haven't gone anywhere and we all remember the good ole days when most of it down here was "redneck territory" and full of swamps.

+1
my dear old mother was a Florida Cracker (seminole and irish, ancestors fought for Florida in the civil war)
it pains me to see how much its changed and how populated its become:barf: . i could be wrong but it seems that Georgia and South Carolina will undergo similar changes within the next ten to twenty years :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

well since you are pro-gun i will offer you this advice. go to either palm beach county, or any county west or north. miami is actually i think kinda, sorta moderate. the cubans seem to balance the many liberal new yorkers, latin americans, and carribean folk. however if you dont speak spanish you are up a creek, possibly wont get a job and in the 20% minority.
Broward in bout 10 years will be the same way with no one speaking intelligible english.
the down side to Palm beach is that real estate will cost you and arm and a leg, with a 3 bedroom house with no land costing you at least 300,000

the gun laws through out the state are very good. cept the gun shows where im pretty sure you need a CCW to purchase.
i think many down here have really learned to trust Jeb and the Republicans at the state level. i think they will stay in power, which will result in more good gun laws. hopefully open carry is next

joab
August 18, 2006, 08:52 AM
the gun laws through out the state are very good. cept the gun shows where im pretty sure you need a CCW to purchase.Gun show purchases are the same as gunstore. CCW alows you to walkout with a handgun , no CCW and you wait three days

FLCLIFF
August 18, 2006, 01:46 PM
I consider Florida the freest state in the United States.:)

Fairlane63
August 18, 2006, 03:44 PM
#1--The site for the proposed gun range is not just 'near a small town' but is, in fact, in the middle of a residential area that includes a church and an elementary school.

The above quote by waterlady501 in post #36 is untrue. Here are aerial photos of the property in question-- the gun range property is outlined in red. These photos are available on the Escambia County Property Appraiser's website:
http://www.escpa.org/

"Middle of a residential area"? Riiiiiight..... Not exactly the middle of suburbia-- if this is a residential area unsuited for a gun range, then so is about 95% of America. This is just more anti-gun propaganda. An elementary school is nearby??!! Heavens! Think of the children!!

43641

43642

Stauble
August 18, 2006, 03:50 PM
Gun show purchases are the same as gunstore. CCW alows you to walkout with a handgun , no CCW and you wait three days

true. you also would have to wait for long guns to. many states let you walkout with your long gun purchaces. not so in FL which is one of my 2 gripes with our gun laws. the other being no open carry.

joab
August 18, 2006, 07:13 PM
you also would have to wait for long guns to. many states let you walkout with your long gun purchaces. not so in FL .
Not true, there is no state mandated waiting period on long guns.
But counties are allowed to extend the handgun waiting period to five days and can apply it to long guns.
Orange and Seminole counties do neither

You must live in Miami-Dade

Stauble
August 18, 2006, 11:02 PM
You must live in Miami-Dade

Broward;)

joab
August 19, 2006, 07:42 AM
I didn't think they did that

Question for the board

If you live in Broward can you come up to Fla and buy a long gun in Orlando and walk out with it ?

BogBabe
August 19, 2006, 10:47 AM
Among Florida's pro-gun features that have already been mentioned, don't forget these:

1. Florida was one of the first in the nation to implement shall-issue carry permits.

2. The state has a specific number of days in which it much process your permit application.

3. If your application is rejected due to an "illegible fingerprint card," they can only ask for re-submission of said card once -- if they still consider the 2nd set illegible, they must issue your permit anyway (providing you meet the other criteria). This prevents anti-gun bureaucrats in Tallahassee from delaying your application indefinitely.

4. Florida is very pro-active in pursuing reciprocal carry recognition with other states. Currently, I believe Florida has recip agreements with more states than any other state.

All indications are that Florida's pro-gun stance will not only continue but increase.

Glock_10mm
August 20, 2006, 10:54 AM
Joab, I dont want an arguement, but from what I've been reading, your area (orange county) tends to have not really changed how police treat cases concerning the law. Here in Palm Beach county, they have been treating the cases with the new law, and have even tried to inact them retroactively to old cases. I think our differences are based on our location, which is much more of my point, that you should be aware of how the major cities treat the new laws vs how the outside cities and counties treat them. The law itself is pretty straight forward, its just how each judical court and city intrepret it. We current;y have a 2004 shooting case in WPB that is being retried and they are trying to retroactively apply the new law. It was initially denied, but the State supreme court is hearing the appeal to enact it...I guess that will be the true test of how the state really views the new law.

Either way, Florida is pretty Pro-Gun, and one of the best in the country in favor of guns! Just check the locale you are looking at going into and see how the police are reacting to the laws. For instance, I found Duval (Jax) and St. John's county (St. Augustine) are very non tolerant counties. You sneeze the wrong way and you might end up in trouble. Who knows how they
will react to the new law or current laws. I guess your best bet is to talk to people who live in the county/city you are moving into, and get their opinion. Overall, FL itself is pretty good, and definately looser than NYC!

As for gun shows, I'm not trying to promote any bad advice as I'm more asking to find out rather than state a fact, but aren't there still (in a few counties), the ability to buy a handgun via private sale without background checks at a show? I know most counties have restricted this, as there were huge broblems in Broward (ft lauderdale) and Hillsboro (tampa), but I was just wondering. I am all pro gun, but I feel its easy enough to get a CCW if you want to walk out with a handgun, so they shoudl close this loophole if they havn't already.

joab
August 20, 2006, 12:15 PM
that you should be aware of how the major cities treat the new laws vs how the outside cities and counties treat them.Orlando is still considered a major city in Fla
The law itself is pretty straight forward, its just how each judical court and city intrepret itThat's what state and district court are for
We current;y have a 2004 shooting case in WPB that is being retried and they are trying to retroactively apply the new law.If you can not be retroactively charged for a crime that was not a crime when you committed it you should not be able to retroactively use a defense that did not exist at the time of the incident.
Either way the accused will have to show that he had no other choice but to use deadly force in public and the Fla constitution has always instructed DAs to "liberally construe the law in favor of the homeowner" if the incident occurred at his place of residence at the time home.
the ability to buy a handgun via private sale without background checks at a show? Orange Seminole require no intrusive background check for private sale, at a gunshow or any other legal location.
but I was just wondering. I am all pro gun, but I feel its easy enough to get a CCW if you want to walk out with a handgun,It's easy enough to get on any state regulated list that you want to, perhaps we should all go down and volunteer for the DNA database or RFID program when it gets here.
We should not be forced to go down with our hats in our hands to apply to pay for the privilege of exercising our rights.
so they shoudl close this loophole if they havn't already.Loophole my ass. It's a private sale of privately own merchandise no matter where the transaction takes place.

Possibly the problem is not with the politicians down south but with the voter base that put those politicians in power.

Stauble
August 20, 2006, 05:57 PM
We should not be forced to go down with our hats in our hands to apply to pay for the privilege of exercising our rights.

+1

10MMGary
September 30, 2006, 02:01 AM
Joab you are the man! That is one of the best replies to total horse hockey I have read in a long time. I am only sorry that I didn't remember to come re-check this thread sooner. You are so on target you should be an forward observer in an artillery unit in your next life:D . I mean it my man very well said!

P.S. This is not directed at Joab. It is Hillsborough county FL not "Hillsboro", Additionally I go to several gunshows a year and have never seen anyone selling loopholes, so I really don't see the need to close them:D .

tegemu
September 30, 2006, 09:52 AM
Yes I do think our gun laws are about to change - for the better.

David904
September 30, 2006, 10:27 AM
Florida is great with regards to being CCW friendly. I was pulled over recently by an FHP Trooper to inform me that one of my taillights were out. No ticket involved - just a friendly community-minded notice (not even required to prove I fixed it.) Anyway, I was carrying my .45 at the time and informed the Trooper as to the fact when he approached the car. He simply smiled and asked me what I carried. We then had a brief but pleasant conversation about our respective firearms and then I went on about my merry.

CCW laws here have finally taken a tack that that forces the courts to look at self defense cases in the light that shey should be looked at - not with the idea of trying to crucify the individual for protecting himself/herself.

I work in some of the worst areas of Bradenton, FL and have had an attempted carjacking and an attempted mugging done on me. Neither of which were successful directly because I had my CCW. And believe it or not, my CCW actually made the entire situation safer for everyone... even those not directly involved. I've also been present at the time of a stabbing and a shooting (both gang-related) at an establishment across the street from where I was working.

I'm grateful to JEB for taking a more commonsense approach to the CCW issue. I feel better knowing that should the worst case scenario transpire and I am unable to run away - and I would muuuuuch rather do just that - I will be able to exercise appropriate mature judgement, defend myself, and be immune to civil suits when/if I am found innocent.

MarkDido
September 30, 2006, 11:57 AM
Jeb has been good for firearms owners in Florida. I hope Charlie Crist will be as good.

ProguninTN
September 30, 2006, 10:58 PM
If FL, laws change I can only hope that there is a push for Open Carry. I don't care if guns scare people. The nation was founded by people with guns. If you don't like that, go back to your anti-gun state or get out of the country. :evil:

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