Democrats seek probe of e-voting


PDA






Desertdog
August 18, 2006, 11:39 PM
Democrats seek probe of e-voting
Diebold disputes study of Cuyahoga machines
By Patrick Cain
Beacon Journal staff writer
http://www.ohio.com/mld/ohio/news/15293430.htm

Democrats criticized Secretary of State J. Kenneth Blackwell on Wednesday for potential electronic voting machine mishaps in Cuyahoga County.

Democrat Jennifer Brunner, who is running for Blackwell's job, called for an investigation into a charge by the Election Science Institute that electronic voting machines made by Green-based Diebold lost ballots in Cuyahoga County's May primary election.

Her Republican opponent, Greg Hartmann, would not say whether the company was at fault. Instead, his spokesman, Mark Weaver, called for a complete audit of the Secretary of State's Office.

Diebold takes issue with the study's findings.

``The conclusion of the reports were an error,'' Diebold spokesman Mark Radke said. ``Basically, it was a flawed audit.''

The election institute could not be reached for comment.

According to the 234-page study, one in six electronic voter tallies did not match the election's paper trail.

The report blames the problems on poll workers and machine errors.

``Here we go again,'' said state Rep. Dan Stewart, D-Columbus, who serves on the House Elections and Ethics Committee. ``I think one of the safest ways for folks to vote this year is going to be vote early and vote absentee, where you have a definite verified paper trail.''

James Lee, spokesman for the Secretary of State's Office, said the apparent problems in Cuyahoga County are an anomaly. He said Stark County had five recounts using the same technology and didn't have any problems.

In fact, 49 of Ohio's 88 counties used Diebold machines and only Democratic-stronghold Cuyahoga County reported malfunctions, Lee said.

Brunner acknowledged more training was needed in Cuyahoga County.

``In the end, human error will trump technology,'' Brunner said, adding that it appears to be a machine problem when tallied votes don't add up to the recorded votes.

``This is like having a calculator that when you put in all the numbers, it doesn't add up correctly,'' she said.

After a ballot is cast, it is stored on a Voter Verified Paper Audit Trail cartridge.

The study found 1.4 percent of the cartridges were missing ballots.

Because there is missing data, the study was ``unable to give a definitive opinion on the accuracy of the Diebold'' machines, according to the ESI study.

Brunner said that Blackwell, the state's chief elections officer who is running for governor, isn't investigating the matter fast enough and to the fullest extent.

``What I don't want to do in this process is increase fear; what I want to do is improve the process,'' she said.

Brunner and others believe a critical look at the source code, which are the instructions for how the electronic machines operate, would show whether there was an error.

Weaver said this is a protected trade secret.

Cuyahoga County hired Election Science Institute to study the May primary election. Unofficial tallies there were not concluded until five days after the balloting.

The San Francisco group is made up primarily of college professors from across the country, including three with ties to Ohio State University.

If you enjoyed reading about "Democrats seek probe of e-voting" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Derby FALs
August 18, 2006, 11:42 PM
I don't trust them. :eek:

Jim March
August 19, 2006, 02:31 AM
See my post here:

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=216321

progunner1957
August 19, 2006, 11:19 AM
Some things have to be done the old fashioned way to ensure they are done correctly. Voting is one of them.

There is too much opportunity to manipulate voting results when computers are involved. The paper ballot is the physical evidence needed to fight election fraud.

Henry Bowman
August 19, 2006, 12:58 PM
Ironic that they should blame Ken Blackwell. As Secretary of State, he fought tooth and nail against these electronic voting machines. He was forced to accept them because of federal law that said the old reliable punch cards had to go and you have to pick one or the other of 2 bad electronic systems.:banghead:

mountainclmbr
August 19, 2006, 01:09 PM
I am sure that the Clinton 2000 Census was used to rig elections for the left more than any voting machine errors/fraud though. And the Democrat push for voting without ID would do the same thing. Larry Pratt wrote a very good article "Using the Census to Achieve Gun Control" here is a link:

http://www.theconservativevoice.com/article/16091.html

ArmedBear
August 19, 2006, 01:15 PM
I think e-voting should be probed.

I am disappointed that it's a Democrat thing. It should be a bi-partisan thing, for two reasons:

1. If something is a partisan issue, the other party will fight it, right or wrong.
2. The Republicans should be just as interested in fair elections as the Democrats.

I also think that the Democrats are doing this for partisan political gain, not in the interest of acting as representatives of their constituents. That doesn't mean I oppose it; it does mean that the outcome will be tainted. It would be just as tainted if the Republicans did the same thing for the same reasons.

JBusch8899
August 19, 2006, 01:22 PM
Not to say that a computer can't be programmed to cheat.

Those 2000 presidential election nightmares of Florida keep coming back to me everytime the topic of election fraud of one sort or another is mentioned.

Perhaps this country should go back to voting the way it did before the Australian rules voting came into effect in this country.

Jim March
August 19, 2006, 02:40 PM
Ironic that they should blame Ken Blackwell. As Secretary of State, he fought tooth and nail against these electronic voting machines. He was forced to accept them because of federal law that said the old reliable punch cards had to go and you have to pick one or the other of 2 bad electronic systems.

Ummmm...he was an *enthusiastic* supporter of Diebold.

mountainclmbr
August 19, 2006, 08:26 PM
It seems that voting would be much more tightly controlled, especially when those in government could try to control outcomes. This implies that voting systems must be protected against what is known as the "Trusted Insider Threat". Both paper voting systems and poorly designed electronic systems are vulnerable to insider threats. The banking industry has some of the highest levels of computer security so it would not be difficult to adapt some of their SW security features into an e-voting system that has strong software authentication and integrity verification as well as a strong system for providing hard copy backup of votes and audit logging of all voting and administrative interactions.

But, if the politicians want to cheat, they will buy the system with the weakest security they can find.

enfield
August 19, 2006, 08:55 PM
Ooooohh, they CRITICIZED him. I'll bet that stung! :barf:

hoji
August 20, 2006, 03:57 PM
"Brunner and others believe a critical look at the source code, which are the instructions for how the electronic machines operate, would show whether there was an error.

Weaver said this is a protected trade secret."


This says it all.
To paraphrase" It does not matter who votes, but who counts the votes"

If you enjoyed reading about "Democrats seek probe of e-voting" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!