Carrying on other's Personal Property


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MDMadrid
August 23, 2006, 08:23 PM
In South Carolina the law states that you have to get permission to carry on someone else’s personal property. (not talking about business, but private homes)

My question is how many of you ask for permission to carry your gun on to your friends or relatives property, and how many just leave their gun in the car?

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atlctyslkr
August 24, 2006, 11:24 PM
We don't have such a law here. We also don't have a law that requires bars to use those little liquor bottles like they use on planes. If I am visiting someone I know well I don't ask because they know I am a gun owner if it's someone I don't I take in on a case by case basis. I probably wouldn't mention it if I was dropping by a business associate's house for five minutes to pick up some paperwork.

neoncowboy
August 24, 2006, 11:35 PM
I don't give it any more thought than I do carrying my cell phone, surefire or pocketknife.

When I get dressed in the morning, I put a gun on.

It goes with me everywhere I go throughout the day unless I have to go somewhere that is strictly forbidden and has the metal detectors and law enforcement officers to prove it.

Why would I draw unnecessary attention to the fact that I'm armed by pointing it out to everyone who I might see or visit throughout the day, asking whether they approve or not?

At the risk of sounding cavalier, that seems silly.

I'm a grown up, acting within my moral and legal rights, doing the right thing by taking up the responsibility of carrying arms. Where does this notion that I need anyone's permission to do so come from?

I guess I figure if I have permission to even be there in the first place, I'm covered. I don't need to also ask for permission to speak, or wear shoes, or look at my watch, or keep my pistol in it's holster.

Otherguy Overby
August 24, 2006, 11:50 PM
Personal property is chattel. IOW, what you are asking is can you carry on someone's shirt or ladder or in their vehicle or something... :)

What you should have asked about is carry on privately owned real estate.

Yeah, I'm picking nits, but they are really important nits.

Standing Wolf
August 25, 2006, 12:15 AM
I carry everywhere. Virtually everyone I know knows I carry. Nobody's ever asked me to leave.

MDMadrid
August 25, 2006, 01:06 AM
What you should have asked about is carry on privately owned real estate

I ask this because it is South Carolina Law that states while on someone else's private property (their place of residence) you must get permission. If something happened and you had to use your gun, and the owner didn't give you permission to be armed on his property, then it will be ruled that you didn't have a right to defend yourself with your gun.

loki.fish
August 25, 2006, 01:10 AM
Sounds like I'm never gonna live in South Carolina. If I'm told by any friends or family that I'm not to carry on their property, I just won't go there anymore.

wdlsguy
August 25, 2006, 01:21 AM
South Carolina Law that states while on someone else's private property (their place of residence) you must get permission. If something happened and you had to use your gun, and the owner didn't give you permission to be armed on his property, then it will be ruled that you didn't have a right to defend yourself with your gun.

Sounds like a "poison pill" to me. You need to get that law fixed.

psychophipps
August 25, 2006, 03:46 AM
I'm not required to ask but do so anyway. Not everyone is comfortable with the idea of having a loaded firearm on one's person at all times. Of course, only one person's wife has had an issue so far and she works in a mental health clinic. She sees people who "just suddenly flipped out" (which is very seldom the real situation if you aren't a sheeple) all day, every day.

I see it as a respect thing...
Mark(psycho)Phipps( HAHAHA! )

RealGun
August 25, 2006, 09:49 AM
This is totally wrong. The restriction is that you cannot enter a private residence carrying without obtaining permission. If the law was for external real estate, there would be virtually nowhere to carry, and furthermore there would be little opportunity for self defense except on your own property.

cuchulainn
August 25, 2006, 10:53 AM
Politeness vs. prudence requires consideration of both the type of person and the type of property.

MDMadrid
August 25, 2006, 06:51 PM
The restriction is that you cannot enter a private residence carrying without obtaining permission.

That is my question...do you get that permission or just leave you gun in your car?

Hawkmoon
August 25, 2006, 07:22 PM
Personal property is chattel. IOW, what you are asking is can you carry on someone's shirt or ladder or in their vehicle or something...

What you should have asked about is carry on privately owned real estate.

Yeah, I'm picking nits, but they are really important nits.
x2

The question is not about "personal" property, it's about "real" property. I don't regard keeping important terminology straight as "picking nits."

And then we find that the question isn't about real property in general, it's actually limited to private dwellings. Mr. (or Ms.) Madrid, I think you'll find that questions receive far more useful responses when they set forth the facts correctly in the asking.

Seems to me there was a lengthy discussion about this a few months back. The discussion became rather heated ... to the point that a guy in one of the southern 'A' states quoted the statutes from a totally different state as if they were the law in his state. I hope this discussion doesn't devolve to similar depths.

Personally? I don't live in a state that subjects me to such an idiotic law. If I did, I would abide by it. I would also probably visit even fewer people than I do now. Those who would deprive me of the means with which to defend myself (and, incidently, them) don't need my company. And there are some passing acquaintances whom I would just as happily not inform that I own firearms, which means I could not ask them.

Lupinus
August 25, 2006, 07:25 PM
private property (buisnesses don't count, only homes), doctors offices, and hospitals are among the places you need expressed permission in order to carry.

I have never quite understood how to phrase such a question. Poke your head in the door and ask?

It is stupid and really makes no sense whatsoever.

Hawkmoon
August 25, 2006, 07:32 PM
I have never quite understood how to phrase such a question. Poke your head in the door and ask?
Anybody got the actual text of the law?

I know this wouldn't fly, but there's a side of me that has to ask: Would it satisfy the letter (not the intent) of the law if I show up armed, pause on the doorstep, and ask, "May I come in?" :evil:

wdlsguy
August 25, 2006, 07:40 PM
SECTION 23‑31‑225. Carrying concealed weapons into residences or dwellings.

No person who holds a permit issued pursuant to Article 4, Chapter 31, Title 23 may carry a concealable weapon into the residence or dwelling place of another person without the express permission of the owner or person in legal control or possession, as appropriate. A person who violates this provision is guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction, must be fined not less than one thousand dollars or imprisoned for not more than one year, or both, at the discretion of the court and have his permit revoked for five years.

http://www.sled.state.sc.us/sled/default.asp?Category=sccwp&Service=StateGunLaws

MDMadrid
August 25, 2006, 07:49 PM
SECTION 23‑31‑225. Carrying concealed weapons into residences or dwellings.

No person who holds a permit issued pursuant to Article 4, Chapter 31, Title 23 may carry a concealable weapon into the residence or dwelling place of another person without the express permission of the owner or person in legal control or possession, as appropriate. A person who violates this provision is guilty of a misdemeanor and, upon conviction, must be fined not less than one thousand dollars or imprisoned for not more than one year, or both, at the discretion of the court and have his permit revoked for five years.


This is in South Carolina, my question to those of you who live here or live in other states that have a law just like this one is this. Do you ask them and (if yes) carry in their house, or do you just leave your weapon in the car, and don't bother to ask?I ask this because I want the least amount of people knowing that I carry as possible. I don't what to inform everybody, but I don't want to go to their home unarmed! Any thought out thoughts?!?

neoncowboy
August 25, 2006, 10:20 PM
Or do you just carry your gun discreetly, keep your mouth shut and trust that if you don't create a situation where people have cause to freak out over your weapon, you won't have a situation where people are freaking out over your weapon.

This same strategy works in all kinds of places.

I've noticed over and over again that if you don't give the police a reason to jack you up and pat you down for weapons, they don't do it.

Hawkmoon
August 26, 2006, 12:06 AM
I don't what to inform everybody, but I don't want to go to their home unarmed! Any thought out thoughts?!?

Personally? I don't live in a state that subjects me to such an idiotic law. If I did, I would abide by it. I would also probably visit even fewer people than I do now. Those who would deprive me of the means with which to defend myself (and, incidently, them) don't need my company. And there are some passing acquaintances whom I would just as happily not inform that I own firearms, which means I could not ask them.

I don't believe in violating laws with which I don't agree. It's much better to get them changed, or revoked. It can be done -- I have done it.

The last time this was being discussed, just out of curiosity I asked one friend if he thought I should ask his permission to enter his home armed. (This is in a state that does NOT require asking.) He said "Hell, no. I assume if I've invited you that you'll be carrying. Otherwise, if we get attacked I have to protect me and you too."

hillbilly
August 26, 2006, 12:26 AM
Arkansas requires you to inform a private home owner if you are trying to come into his or her house while packing. You can carry only with the owner's permission.

But on the flip side, if your piece is concealed, like it's supposed to be, how are they gonna know?

I am NOT advocating breaking any laws.

hillbilly

Otherguy Overby
August 26, 2006, 11:37 AM
hillbilly:

Arkansas requires you to inform a private home owner if you are trying to come into his or her house while packing. You can carry only with the owner's permission.

But on the flip side, if your piece is concealed, like it's supposed to be, how are they gonna know?

I am NOT advocating breaking any laws.

I open carry on my land and also visit the 2 neighbors on our private road openly carrying. (AR Ozarks, of course)

Legal open carry would solve this problem. Of course we can carry a long gun, if it complies with hunting season regs... :( Was it you who mentioned that hunting season restrictions are waived for keeping long guns in your vehicle?

Doug.38PR
August 26, 2006, 03:41 PM
Louisiana has the same law. Texas doesn't. But when in Louisiana I mostly go to see relatives. Some of them know I carry and don't mind, other's don't know I carry and I....either leave the gun in the car most or carry it in in a suitcase and put it on when I am about to leave or such. I am not very strict about keeping it in the car as they won't have me arrested or anything, but try to do so just to stay within the law.
When I move there and go see other people outside family, I will probably start leaving it in the car unless they know me and it is okay. Stupid law really.

Taurus 66
August 26, 2006, 10:47 PM
In South Carolina the law states that you have to get permission to carry on someone else’s personal property.

What kind of permission? Verbal or Written?

Ezekiel
August 27, 2006, 02:45 PM
I'm a grown up, acting within my moral and legal rights, doing the right thing by taking up the responsibility of carrying arms.

Not if you're within the control of my property rights and I do not desire you to be there/carry.

If you don't care for such, don't trespass.

"It's not that hard." :banghead:

I am often confused by folks on this board getting riled because someone might have the audacity to exercise their right to say "no." Here's what you do: Just don't go there anymore, for business or pleasure.

Hell, I'm not even saying what my personal opinion would be on someone carrying on my property or in my home -- merely that I fully reserve the right to tell you to step.

What's the big deal? :fire:

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