Take a Chance? J.C. Higgins .30-06


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priv8ter
May 8, 2003, 06:02 PM
While looking at the gun store for an inexpensive used rifle, I spotted a J.C. Higgins Model 51-L in .30-06.

I picked it up, and comparing it to the Winchester Model 70 next to it, couldn't see much wrong with it. It appeared solid and well built.

I know that it is a rifle that was made for Sears(back when they weren't afraid to sell guns) and I already have a Ted Williams semi-auto shotgun that has yet to let me down.

I am just wondering if this rifle is worth taking a risk on for $250ish.

Thanks!

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nextjoe
May 8, 2003, 06:22 PM
I'm 99% sure that that's the model built on an FN Supreme Mauser action. If you don't buy it, drop me an email; I'd probably like to get it :D

Best,
Joe

Sisco
May 8, 2003, 06:45 PM
I tried to cross reference the model number in the Numrich Gun Parts catalog, they don't list a model 51-L in either the JC Higgins or Sears names. Are there any other marks?
Gunparts cross reference is available at their website too
http://www.e-gunparts.com/crossref.asp

MacPelto
May 8, 2003, 06:46 PM
A quick cross-refernce indicates that the Sears 51 is the FN, and that the 51-L was made by Husqvarna.

I'd buy it.

nextjoe
May 8, 2003, 06:49 PM
MacPelto is right; I was just about to post the same thing :cool:

It's still worth the money, but it's not what I was looking for...

Best,
Joe

Mannlicher
May 8, 2003, 07:16 PM
I know the model 52 was a Sako, the 54 by FN. Sears used top manufacturers to make their JC Higgins rifles. My son has a Model 51, and that one indeed was also made by FN. These are fine rifles, and to be used with pride.

Sisco
May 8, 2003, 08:49 PM
Where did you guys find the reference? Not disputing your answers, just wondering if I missed in the Gunparts book.

Art Eatman
May 8, 2003, 10:41 PM
After 35 years I don't remember the model number, but my J.C. Higgins .270 would shoot 5-shot groups around 1 MOA, +/-, with 130-grain handloads.

Art

BHP9
May 9, 2003, 10:24 AM
The model 51 was indeed a Belgium FN Supreme action. The absolute finest rifle action ever made. I do indeed own one. I did not know that Sears had a later model made by Husky but although the Husky was based more on the Mauser 96 action it still had outstanding workmanship and was made from quality forgings. Try and compare these beautifully made works of art to much of the cast and stamped sheet metal garbage that is being made today.

My own model 51 270 only recently put 3 shots into 3/4 of an inch at 100 yards using 54 grains of 4350 behind a Nosler 130 grain ballistic tip bullet. Disproving once and for all that modern rifles shoot better. As a matter of fact some of my newer rifles do not shoot near this good.

I would drop everything and run to buy this gun. Get down to the gun store early and do not wait for them to unlock the door, rip the door off of its hindges and run in waving your money. More and more people are starting to find out what gems they really were compared to the junk being made today. The Sears guns had no plastic, no stamped sheet metal and no castings. They were forged as all quality arms were when made back in the glory days of real gun making.

MacPelto
May 10, 2003, 12:38 AM
Where did you guys find the reference? Not disputing your answers, just wondering if I missed in the Gunparts book.

I have an old paper cross reference, but I confirmed it online at the hoosier gun parts site...Numrich isn't the only parts company out there, they couldn't even get me parts for a Remington 725:(

HarryB
May 11, 2003, 10:10 AM
I have that rifle!
http://pic7.picturetrail.com/VOL188/1012473/2061961/24784004.jpg

It will easily shoot MOA or less, has a great trigger and smooth action.

Nice companion to my 1918 Swede Mauser...

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