Steelframed 1858 "buffalo" & barrel switching


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elephant_man
September 24, 2006, 12:53 AM
I'm thinking about getting my first Remington copy and decided I want one with the 12 inch barrel. Cabella's sells one in brass and stainless steel, but the stainless steel is too expensive ($390) and I don't want the brass one. So does any place sell a plain steel version? It doesn't look like it.

If not, I think I can just buy a regular 1858 Army and buy a buffalo barrel from VTIgunparts so I pay just under 280 dollars. Is switching out barrels something that's easy to do or would I have to get a gunsmith to do this?

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Manyirons
September 24, 2006, 08:48 AM
Yup, fer fittin er, smiths tha best way ta go. Ya can warp a frame REAL easy lessen ya got tha right tools.

http://www.bigironbarrels.com/

Gatofeo
September 24, 2006, 01:40 PM
By all means, have a gunsmith swap barrels for it. I met a guy years ago who told me a sad story. He bought a repro Remington with a brass frame. Wanted a shorter barrel on it, so he tried to remove the barrel in his garage, with the barrel clamped in a vice.
Trouble was ... threads on the blamed thing were LEFT hand! So, in his first attempt to loosen the barrel he was actually tightening it. So, he and another fellah put a pipe on the wooden block he had in the frame.
The result? A badly twisted brass frame --- scratch one revolver!
I've never heard of a Left-hand thread on a frame but weird stuff happens. I can't recall who made his revolver, but this happened back in the 1970s so it could have been made in Spain, Belgium or Italy.
Anyway, it's best to have a gunsmith do this. At least, if HE screws it up, he owes you a new gun.
Actually, if I were you, I'd just save up and get a second Remington with the barrel length you want. Today's cap and ball revolvers are reasonably priced. A gunsmith might charge you $40 to $60 to swap out that barrel. Do that a few times and that's the cost of a new revolver.

Hmmmmm ... wouldn't it be neat to have someone come out with a cap and ball revolver with easily interchanged barrels? And an easily changed grip frame? You could go from a pocket .44 or .36 to a full-sized target gun.
I'm thinking something along the lines of what Dan Wesson made years ago, with its interchanging grip and barrel .357 Magnum.
Oh, I know the Colt cap and ball can swap barrels easily. Seems to me that an accessory birds-head grip frame for the Colt would be a good item to market. It wouldn't be authentic, not with Birdshead grips, but it would be a fun creature to own.

Okay. It's official. I've rambled. Um .. where was I?
Oh yeah ... get a gunsmith to swap barrels for you, but also look into buying a second revolver. This latter option seems the most workable.

gmatov
September 25, 2006, 02:05 AM
Gatafeo,

I would never, before this, doubt anything you say, BUT, I think you are a little bit FOS with the "left hand thread". I don't care WHO made it..

Cheers,

George

Wwalstrom
September 25, 2006, 08:25 AM
"Hmmmmm ... wouldn't it be neat to have someone come out with a cap and ball revolver with easily interchanged barrels? And an easily changed grip frame? You could go from a pocket .44 or .36 to a full-sized target gun.
I'm thinking something along the lines of what Dan Wesson made years ago, with its interchanging grip and barrel .357 Magnum.
Oh, I know the Colt cap and ball can swap barrels easily. Seems to me that an accessory birds-head grip frame for the Colt would be a good item to market. It wouldn't be authentic, not with Birdshead grips, but it would be a fun creature to own."

Three of four months ago, I had the same idea ... use the same concept as a Dan Wesson revolver. Interchangeable barrels, and grips. I drew a (crude) sketch, based on the Remington/Ruger design.

Of course, this is pretty simple to do with a Colt ... just buy another barrel.

Smokin_Gun
September 26, 2006, 03:13 AM
I have heard of 1858 frames getting tweaked from barrel removal, usually from the de-barreler turnin' it the wrong way. Or the barrel being epoxied in with tread lock of some kind. I know Uberti, Pietta, Asp, and ASM are all right hand threaded barrels. Don't know tha Spanish Mfg'd one.
With a right hand twist and a left hand threaded barrel I would think it would shoot the barrel loose...what ya think?

Gatofeo
September 30, 2006, 12:19 AM
gmatov:
I'm just repeating what the guy told me years ago, that he had a left-hand thread percussion revolver. I dunno. Mebbe he was FOS.
I've never heard of such a beast, but the very micro-second I say one was never made --- someone will find one! :D
But yeah, gmatov, it does sound like the typical BS endemic to the shooting sports. I probably shouldn't have repeated it, since I have no way to verify it, but not everything we hear may be verified.
I mean, I can't be sure that Julius Caesar was a real person because I was born shortly after he died.
However, Mec might recall seeing his funeral pyre! :neener:

gmatov
September 30, 2006, 01:41 AM
Cat,

Mebbe I should have used different letters.

Smoke mentioned that mebbe a left hand twist would shoot the barrel loose, with the impact loading. Thing is, Colt and Smith both use right hand thread and they use opposing twists.

If you have ever tried to unscrew a Remington barrel, and retighten it, you would see that it would take a hell of a lot of torque to reseat the barrel.

I bought the "Rem in a box" on Gunbroker a while back. Cleaned up the pipewrenched barrel, untwisted the frame, and could not, with my tools at hand, grip the barrel tight enough, over enough of the barrel, to retighten it to square without rounding off the corners of the barrel with ordinary handtools.

You ain't gonna shoot them loose with any load you can fit in them..

Cheers,

George

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