In Norway, more women take up hunting and sports shooting


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Drizzt
May 13, 2003, 09:43 PM
Associated Press Worldstream

May 10, 2003 Saturday

SECTION: INTERNATIONAL NEWS

DISTRIBUTION: Europe; Britian; Scandinavia; Middle East; Africa; India; Asia; England

LENGTH: 832 words

HEADLINE: In Norway, more women take up hunting and sports shooting

BYLINE: WILLIAM STOICHEVSKI; Associated Press Writer

DATELINE: OSLO, Norway

BODY:
The gunfire in this city at night is not an angry, heart-stopping racket.

Through the crack of rifle shot, there's often a feminine giggle.

On the firing line of the city's Ekeberg Sports Hall is a woman, her smile as clear as the gaping centers shot through paper targets. Wearing stiff, canvass coveralls that cling like Velcro to firing mats, Grete Andresen, a University of Oslo administrator, snaps quick advice to young shooters beside her before she takes aim again.

According to the Norwegian Federation of Sports, twice as many women shoot competitively and for fun as did 10 years ago. For every 10 registered sharpshooters in the Nordic country, one is a markswoman taking aim on the firing range, hunting in the thick forests or shooting targets in a grueling biathlon.

In a country of 4.5 million residents, approximately 30,000 are members of sport shooting clubs.

In cosmopolitan Oslo, the capital, or in the natural splendor of fabled Telemark, Norwegian women are swelling the ranks of trained sharpshooters.

Andresen, 54, joined the Norstrand Shooting Club in part to be nearer to her daughter, who had taken up shooting as sport.

"I think it's pretty boring sitting on the sofa or waiting in the car," she said. "But I could never shoot a deer."

Her sentiment echoes Gisle Bach, a 17-year-old high-school student who likens aiming for the bull's-eye to hitting other personal goals. She owns one of an estimated 1 million guns carried in cases, stored on farms, or locked in police trunks in Norway.

Despite the high number of weapons, Norwegian society is not gun-oriented. In Oslo, police still keep their guns locked inside the trunks of their cruisers. They only recently lobbied to carry sidearms after discovering caches of illicit automatic weapons.

Olaf Schjoell, secretary of the Norwegian Hunting and Fishing Society, said when people apply for a firearm, it's usually not for self-defense.

"It's to go hunting," Schjoell said. "And a big part of hunting education is safety on the hunt, safety with the weapon, and then we also train the shooting-range operators."

Andresen said she preferred shooting on the range with a 6 1/2-kilogram (14 pound), 22-caliber rifle, the firearm of choice for biathletes and novices alike.

According to the Norwegian Sport Shooting Union, a major draw of shooting is the relative speed by which new people can start competing.

Andresen entered competition as soon as she started in April 2002, albeit against children. In the shooting hierarchy, her daughter competes two classes higher.

Women competing alongside men is a long tradition in egalitarian Norway. The army has several all-female combat units, and the Royal Navy boasts the world's first female submarine skipper.

The success of Norwegian women like Lindy Hansen and Birgit Roenningen as World Cup sport-shooting medallists may have encouraged some women to take up the sport, but markswoman Andresen explained at her shooting club that she first picked up a rifle because it added a special dimension to her life.

"When I'm here, I'm here. I decide that I must be here and to leave everything else away from here. I learn to concentrate, and I always have something I feel like talking about," she said.

According to a new study by the Organization for European Co-operation and Development, sport shootings new appeal among Norwegian women has coincided with a rise in juvenile crime among Norwegian teenage girls.

The report, Society at a Glance, says females between 13 and 19 in Norway account for 27 percent of juvenile crime in the country, the highest rate among the 30 affluent countries surveyed. Yet, while the connection between poverty and crime is well established, relative affluence distinguishes Norway's female shooters.

The sport utility vehicles, Mercedes Benzes and Land Rovers parked outside on practice night points to the sport's appeal to the affluent. A hunting course costs 2,500 kroner (US$340), an average rifle costs no less than 7,000 kroner (US$940), while the price tag on a handgun can read 25,000 kroner (US$3,355).

Shooting clubs charge 500 kroner (US$70) for memberships, but would-be sharpshooters first apply to the police for a 700 kroner (US$100) permit to buy the guns. The canvas coveralls can cost 3,000 kroner (US$400).

The National Sport Shooting Association says there are 550 shooting clubs in the country, and more continue to form. Meanwhile, 300,000 registered hunters played no part in the 15 gun-related killings reported during 2002.

The numbers on the firing line appear destined to grow, judging by the recruiting of children into the sport of shooting. Preadolescent boys and girls, whose shooting scores occupy regular columns on newspaper sports pages, open fire alongside adults at shooting clubs.

A recent newspaper ad promoting registration said simply: "Shooting school for boys and girls from (age) 4. Registration at 5:30 p.m. Bring a helmet."

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Schuey2002
May 13, 2003, 10:05 PM
I'm waiting for Kobun to chime in on this one..;)

Dave P
May 14, 2003, 12:41 PM
Drizz, we need pictures!

Olga, Helga, and Ericka

El Tejon
May 14, 2003, 12:56 PM
Mus hunting anyone?

I'd like to take up Norwegian women.:D

M67
May 14, 2003, 02:21 PM
Hey, guys! This is a shooting related thread. And all you can think of is pictures of Norwegian women. :scrutiny:

I'm a shooting coach. I teach young, nubile, Norwegian women to shoot all the time. Eat your hearts out. :neener: :D :D

Not only do they look at least as good as they do in your dreams, you should see 'em shoot! Just last week a group of young ladies were doing very well on their third ever visit to the range. One of them put five rounds into two inches with my S&W 686, the first time she ever touched a revolver in her life. OK, she "cheated" and used both hands, and she fired it single action, but she did do it from 25 meters...

Btw, aren't you glad that the intelligent reporter immediately spotted a correlation between women sports shooters and female juvenile delinquents? /sarcasm. %&ยค%& American idiot! (OK, maybe that was a sarcasm too, sort of.)

El T, what's "mus hunting"?

El Tejon
May 14, 2003, 04:27 PM
M67, the only Norwegian I know comes from reading Uncle Jeff. It is my understanding that the Norge "moose" (mus with those dot thingies over the "u") is what we call a mouse. You would call our moose an elg and our mice a moose.:)

So, um, er, could you, um, post a photo of an all female class, especially the ones with the double braids?

M67
May 14, 2003, 05:36 PM
El Tejon, that would indeed be "mus" we don't use the "thingies" in Norwegian (although I can make one with my keyboard). Just be careful, if you walk up a Norwegian girl and tell her you're "mouse-hunting" ("musejakt" in Norwegian) she might misunderstand - or not. You see, that word can be misunderstood the same way as certain English words for cat or "large water-dwelling rat with protruding front teeth", or another name for male poultry for those hunting the other side of the fence...

Well, that concludes today's language class... I have to stop before I say something Art's Grammaw would disapprove of. :)

Btw, I coach club members, I don't get paid. I donate my free time for the good of the shooting sports. Ah, the sacrifices we have to make...

TechBrute
May 14, 2003, 05:41 PM
I wish more women would pick up the shooting sports everywhere.

NonServiam
May 14, 2003, 06:06 PM
Hey, it's fact-checking time.

In a country of 4.5 million residents, approximately 30,000 are members of sport shooting clubs.

Yes, if you only count the one shooting organisation you visited. There are 180,000 active members in the 960 clubs of the "Volunteer Shooting Union", our national NRA/CMP equivalent. And 346,000 registered hunters. We also have other organisations: CAS, ISPC, black powder shooters, benchrest ++
Of course, there is a certain amount of overlap here :) Ya just gotta shoot 'em all. (Just two orgs for me as of yet, but I'm starting ISPC. Too busy being M67's boss in the club :evil: )

1 million guns carried in cases, stored on farms, or locked in police trunks in Norway

And stored in the many urban apartments, suburban villas and wind blown residents by the sea.

sport shootings new appeal among Norwegian women has coincided with a rise in juvenile crime among Norwegian teenage girls

females between 13 and 19 in Norway account for 27 percent of juvenile crime in the country

No correlation. The rise in female juvenile crime is almost exclusively an inner city/second gen. immigrants/gang related problem. No legal guns used, and in general not much gun use at all i female juvenile crime.

The sport utility vehicles, Mercedes Benzes and Land Rovers

Well, there is a bus that strops just outside. And I keep seeing nothing but 10 year old Toyotas and Subarus ...

the price tag on a handgun can read 25,000 kroner (US$3,355)

Yes, if you're gettin a frikin STI. Jeez. $750 for a CZ-75.

Bring a helmet

:confused: I'm sure the text read hearing protection ...

Otherwise, real accurate :rolleyes:

Kobun
May 14, 2003, 06:54 PM
Hey, NonServ...

A STI isn't 25K, unless you get a open gun or something.
I should know... :D
But that isn't really bad.
Think rifle... then Accuracy International, SG 550 Sniper or SSG 3000 (its not that bad!)...
Call me for a price quote. :)

As for the 1mill gun part. I think this is a low estimate.
The right figure is probably 1.5 to 2 times that much.

A heavy .22LR being the first choice in gun??? That might be the case with that one club in Oslo, but sure not the norm for the rest of Norway...

BerettaNut92
May 14, 2003, 06:59 PM
Out of curiosity, where are the Norwegian immigrants from?

Chinese-American-Norwegian? I'm trying to get used to the way that sounds. I'm a CAN...yeah.... :o

M67
May 14, 2003, 07:05 PM
I wish more women would pick up the shooting sports everywhere. Amen. Being serious for a moment, I think we need to get a number of women involved so that their more timid sisters can see that it isn't all that dangerous, and that not all shooters are knuckle-dragging cave-men. Which brings me to NonServiam.

The 30,000 members mentioned would be those shooting ISSF-style competition. If you count all of us, shooting is the largest organized sport in the country, with - I think - more than 400,000 active members. The article says a million guns, I think the correct number of legal guns (police and military excluded) is closer to 2 1/2 million. 10 year old Subarus, you're not referring to me are you? Mine is 15. On the other hand, I did fondle some really sexy double rifles last week, the nicest one starting at $5k. So if the choice is between a new car or an old car and a gun... that's not really a choice at all, is it? Maybe some time in the future, for now I have a thousand dollar shotgun and a two thousand dollar small bore pistol higher on the list.

BerettaNut92
May 14, 2003, 09:21 PM
What's ISSF? Intl Subgun Shootin' Foundation?

I wonder how Norway is with dual citizenships....

Kobun
May 15, 2003, 02:21 AM
Skunk
You don't need to be a citizen here to own and buy guns.
You would need a reason for living here.
A residency because you got a job is one posibility.
Residents are required to follow the same rules as Norwegians, meaning that if you want to keep guns here more than three months, you will need to get them registerd, and for that you will eighter have to take a hunters class (for rifles and shotguns), and/or become a member of a shooting club that has a shooting program where you can use those guns you wish to have here.
On holidays you can bring the guns that you need for competitions. Just make sure you get an invitation to a match somewhere.

Right now I am going to call one of the Police districts on behalf of a German who is going to live here for a few years.
He has had some problems, because the person handeling his request is ignorant to quite a few rules.
Isn't it great when you have to teach the Police to do their job? :banghead:

K.

twoblink
May 15, 2003, 05:15 AM
I've always been fond of Scandanavian women who are uber-sized.. And if they are packin', all the sexier!

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