Marlin 336: C v. W?


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Nematocyst
October 8, 2006, 10:31 PM
Summary of this post: in comparing the Marlin 336C with their 336W, is there any difference in terms of materials & workmanship in the most important parts of the rifle: the action, barrel, etc?
___________

Background for those who want it:

In the last couple of weeks, I've taken a new turn in my months long (nearly year long) search for that do-everything-cause-I-can-only-afford-one centerfire rifle.

I've been impressed and inspired by a project by THR's George Hill that he calls CAR: cowboy assault rifle, a modification of a Marlin 336 in .30-30.

George's THR thread is here (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=221576&highlight=cowboy+assault).

The full story with images is here (http://www.madogre.com/Interviews/Marlin336CS.htm).

As a former Marlin 336 owner who regrets ever having sold it :( ,
even if it was out of necessity at the time, I want a CAR. :D :evil: :D

So, I've started looking around for Marlins, both new and used.

Marlin currently produces three 336 versions: A, C, SS (stainless) & W.

New, W is about $100 less than C. I've started looking into why since it's not entirely clear on their web pages about 336C (http://www.marlinfirearms.com/Firearms/centerfire/336C.aspx)& 336W (http://www.marlinfirearms.com/Firearms/centerfire/336W.aspx).

This afternoon, I read through a bunch of THR threads from the archives about this issue. It seems that the main differences are stock (C is walnut, W is hardwood) and some hardware, like less expensive sights, barrel rings & buttplate on the W. (For example, see post #9 in this thread (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=185717&highlight=336w).)

Since I would put a synthetic Ramline stock on it, it seems foolish to purchase a 336C with that beautiful walnut furniture. The buttplate also doesn't matter, and I can always upgrade the sights.

But still, I have trouble believing that a walnut stock and slightly better external hardware would increase price by $100.

So, I'm posting this to double check with our Marlin experts: I want to make sure that the most important parts of the 336W are the same as the 336C with no quality shortcuts: the action, barrel, etc.

My concern is that Marlin may do for the 336W what Remington does with its 870 Express series. The latter are good guns, but some corners were cut in materials and workmanship to bring the price down.

Thanks in advance for any information. Sources appreciated.

Nem

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ScottsGT
October 9, 2006, 09:13 AM
I know the W has a gold trigger, and is sold at discount stores like Wal-Mart. I figured that's why they call it the "W"-for Wal-Mart :D
But I too did a lot of looking before buying my C model, since I like nice Walnut stocks. All I could find is stocks, front sight shield, hardware, etc. too. Don't waste your time calling Marlin, I don't think they are going to admit they build an inferior product. I'd suggest ask a gunsmith over on the gunsmithing page?

dogngun
October 9, 2006, 09:27 AM
I suggest you shop for a used Marlin-there are millions of them, they are very inexpensive, and you can examine and handle the gun as much as you like before you buy it. I have a1961 336SC (short magazine) Marlin in .35 Rem that I bought for $175. It's very smooth, high quality, shoots great, and is a fine defence weapon in addition to a super hunting rifle. I have added a butt cuff and a Limb saver recoil pad, and replaced the rear sight with a newer Marlin Buckhorn sight, larger so I can see it better. They are excellent "offhand" shooting rifles, very quick to point, fast handling, and a good alternative to the black rifles.
I don't there is any difference in the rifles you mentioned other than the cosmetic differences.
The basic action and the materials are identical.
Mark

GooseGestapo
October 9, 2006, 11:25 AM
ScottsGT and Dogngun both were more or less correct.
There is NO difference in the finish or internals of the actions, barrels, ect.

The only difference is in the stocks and the distribution chain.

I too suggest that you look for a good used gun. Especially with the Marlins, most are shot little, hunted with a lot, and put up "wet", so they get a lot of external wear, but not enough shooting to ever "break them in".

Id bet that most 20-30yr old Marlins have never had more than 200rds through them.

If the bore's are clean and free of rust or pitting, and actions likewise (internally, at least), the worse the outside finish looks, the better the purchase price..(for you at least).

Be aware, that Marlin can and will refinish a rifle for you, and they usually look like new when returned. Prices are actually below what a local gunsmith will charge, too.

The Marlin rifles (USED) are perhaps the best value in a hunting rifle on the market. Used one's in my area, with a scope of some description are running around $225-300, depending on caliber. A .35Rem will run you perhaps $50 more due to scarcity. Vast majority are in .30/30.
A local pawn shop has about 10 used ones to pick from!

I've got three Marlins,(.30/30, .35, .45/70) and all three will shoot at or near MOA with ammo that "suits them". One is a "Glenfield m30" so dosen't have a gold trigger or walnut stock (birch) and has the "half-magazine. It was sold new in the early '70 by K-Mart. It still shoots very well, indeed!

Nematocyst
October 10, 2006, 04:11 AM
Thanks for the responses and advice, folks.

I suggest you shop for a used Marlin-there are millions of them, they are very inexpensive, and you can examine and handle the gun as much as you like before you buy it.On that recommendation, I called every gun shop & pawn shop in this town and the one across the river today.

Only 1 used Marlin 336 found. $300+, and they weren't even sure if it was an A or a W.

Maybe it's because it's hunting season. I'll keep trying.

I did look on GunBroker, and there are a number of them. But I'd really like to handle and look at one before buying.

Speaking of the 336A, anyone know how it differs from C & W?

Nem

ScottsGT
October 10, 2006, 09:38 AM
A is the same as the W, but without the gold trigger.

Fred Fuller
October 10, 2006, 09:48 AM
Nem,

I'm a 336 fan too, though I haven't spent as much time exploring details with them as with 870s. I'd add one more vote to looking for a good used (pre-crossbolt safety in this case) 336 in .30-30, with the same confidence as looking for a good used 870. The 336 is another great design, simple, robust, easy to fieldstrip, clean and repair if necessary, easy to keep running forever with spare parts that will fit in a twist of waxed paper stored in the buttstock.

Hunting season always cuts into availability of good used guns, around here there are a pretty good number of people who don't own a gun year round- they buy one, hunt with it for a season, and then sell it when hunting season is over. Hereabouts it's mostly 870 Express guns as far as shotguns are concerned, and for rifles a lot of them are Marlin 336s. For a while a good used 336 could be had for $100, those days are long gone, with prices now more like $250. I'd suggest waiting till spring, or taking a chance on an offering from one of the online brokers. Or perhaps someone here who runs across a buy good enough to warrant the cost of shipping could tip you as to the dealer who has it? Nothing like networking...

lpl/nc

chad1043
October 10, 2006, 12:28 PM
I don't post here that often, cause I really love my other forum...

http://www.marlinowners.com/board/

IF you wanna get all the information you need, check them out. There is even a For Sale section towards the bottom... I bought a 30-30 from there. They are all really great guys.

Peace,
Chad

ArmedBear
October 10, 2006, 12:51 PM
they buy one, hunt with it for a season, and then sell it when hunting season is over.

I understand that money can be quite tight, but it seems to me that the expenses involved in selling the gun and finding another one (when everyone else is also buying them) would quickly chip away at the money. Just driving the thing 15 miles down the road starts costing enough to eat into $250. And sighting the thing in costs money, too. With someone's used rifle, you never know, whereas you know if your OWN gun is shooting straight.

Why do people do this?

Father Knows Best
October 10, 2006, 01:04 PM
Why do people do this?
Lots of people still live from paycheck to paycheck. Getting $100 or $200 for a used rifle can make a big difference in your life when your kids are hungry, the car is out of gas, the rent is due, and it's still another week 'til payday. You hope that things will get better in time for you to find another rifle before next hunting season.

I'm also in favor of buying used. New guns are a crapshoot these days. Far too many have problems new from the factory. Used guns may have problems, too, but I've had much better luck with them. You just need to know how to evaluate a used gun.

Under Marlin 336's and Winchester 94's aren't too hard to find around here. That would be my recommendation.

But why on earth take off the wood stock and put some plastic fantastic thing on it? It won't affect your accuracy at all, and a well finished stock will stand up to any reasonable use and storage. If you really expect to abuse the gun, then go plastic, but if you're going that far you should also go with stainless steel.

ScottsGT
October 10, 2006, 01:07 PM
I understand that money can be quite tight, but it seems to me that the expenses involved in selling the gun and finding another one (when everyone else is also buying them) would quickly chip away at the money. Just driving the thing 15 miles down the road starts costing enough to eat into $250. And sighting the thing in costs money, too. With someone's used rifle, you never know, whereas you know if your OWN gun is shooting straight.

Why do people do this?


The guys I knew in the past that did this were the kind of guys that lived for today. Drank their paycheck up on Friday, pawned everything on Saturday to make it thru the week. They were'nt hunting until next year, and "that rifle in the closet is worth 6 cases of beer."
These are the guys that never get ahead in life, much less even, and cannot plan ahead and think of tomorrow.

George Hill
October 10, 2006, 05:12 PM
Don't cut into a new rifle. Do up a used one. If you are getting a new rifle, get the XLR version and leave it as is because it is sweetness. No need for alteration. Scout out your local shops for a cheap used one then go to town on it.

:evil:

dakotasin
October 10, 2006, 08:54 PM
ok... in bolt guns, it is common for a cheap synthetic stock to weigh more than a wood stock. pardon the thread hijack, but how much lighter than wood is a synthetic stock on a lever gun? anybody ever actually weigh the two?

Nematocyst
October 11, 2006, 02:12 AM
Chad, thanks for the heads up on that Marlin Owners forum. Nice resource. I suspect I'll enroll there, too. (Oh, dang, just what I need: yet another web forum to participate in... :rolleyes: )

But why on earth take off the wood stock and put some plastic fantastic thing on it? It won't affect your accuracy at all, and a well finished stock will stand up to any reasonable use and storage. If you really expect to abuse the gun, then go plastic, but if you're going that far you should also go with stainless steel.I hear you, and understand your objections. For me, there are two factors in my plan to go synthetic:

1) weight. George Hill noted that when he put a Ramline synthetic stock on his cowboy assault rifle based on a 336CS, it decreased the weight a bit.

Here is his description (http://www.madogre.com/Interviews/Marlin336CS.htm):

The gun was small and compact, but heavy. Heavier that it should have been. A lot heavier. The problem is the wood stock. Marlin uses some seriously dense walnut in their stocks.

RamLine had a Marlin option and I took it.

I'm very happy with the results. The Black Marlin is light and handy and easy to shoot. I like that, especially since .30-30 has such a low recoil, I can deal with a lighter rifle. (I'm not that big a person - tall and thin - and ounces add up when carrying in the back country.)

Admittedly, that may only be necessary if I wind up with a used 336C or other model with a walnut stock. I'm not sure how much lighter the hardwood stock is than walnut. But in any case, the other factor for me is ....

2) I have liked synthetic stocks for a long time. My first was on a Rem Nylon 66 in .22 as a kid. Now, both my CZ 452 and my 870P have synthetic furniture, and both my handguns have synthetic grips. I like their look, durability and feel. I don't plan to abuse my guns - just the opposite, I like taking great care of them. But in a SHTF/TEOTWAWKI scenario (which I expect - trust me, don't get me started...), I think the synthetic furniture will hold up better with less care than wood.

I'll admit I could be wrong, but that's my working hypothesis.

Wood is beautiful, but synthetic is more durable over the long run, me thinks.

And all of you recommending going with a used one is good advice. I'm going to try to do that.

Lee's suggestion is a tough one, though:

I'd suggest waiting till spring...<little boy stomping his feet and pouting his lips>

But I don't want to wait until spring! I want to start on this now! :mad:

:D ;)

Nem

Nematocyst
October 11, 2006, 05:28 AM
Chad, thanks for the heads up on that Marlin Owners forum. Nice resource. I suspect I'll enroll there, too. (Oh, dang, just what I need: yet another web forum to participate in... )I'm now an official member of MarlinOwners Forum under the name ***. (I could have registered under the name ***-336, but thought I'd give the numbers a rest. Besides, regardless of what centerfire rifle I get, my main long gun will still be an 870. ;) )

It's a bit slow over there, but nonetheless, I can tell there's good people and information floating around.

I'll post something up as an introduction in a few days...weeks...after reading a while.

Looking forward to owning a 336 again soon.

Nem

Fred Fuller
October 11, 2006, 12:14 PM
ArmedBear,

"Here" for me in this case is beautiful downtown Fayetteville, NC, home to Ft. Bragg and environs, and to more pawn shops per square inch than anyplace else on the eastern seaboard other than Jacksonville, NC (home of Camp Lejeune, USMC). A good number of troops seem do this, maybe not every hunting season but every tour of duty at least. Many times it's more out of curiosity- they want to try different rifles/shotguns/handguns, and can't afford to accumulate a collection, so they trade in and buy something else. Troops who live in barracks on post can't store their firearms in their rooms, they have to be checked into the unit arms room and signed out for use. Moving them can be a hassle also, and so they just sell them when it's time to PCS- especially if they are going overseas. Tree suit guys are accustomed to 'issue' weapons and pretty much seem to have the same attitude about firearms in general- one is about as good as another.

There are a fair number of folks hereabouts that do have a really short-term outlook on things, or who are really financially pressed as well. They do look at any asset not in immediate use as a source of money for something else- be it rent, groceries, shoes for the kids, or beer. I was surprised when a couple of different pawn shop owners told me that sort of thing went on regularly in their experience, it is so foreign to the attitude of 'gun people' in general. But not everyone who owns a gun is a 'gun person' it seems, and pragmatism rules with a heavy hand sometimes.

Different strokes, in other words...

Sorry for the thread drift, Nem- keep looking and a good candidate will turn up, I'm sure.

lpl/nc

Nematocyst
October 11, 2006, 05:23 PM
Lee,

No problemo about the thread drift. It's just natural. The main point of a thread will always continue to plow through the drifts as long as it's of interest to folks.

Besides, such great stories and information comes out of thread drifts that sometimes, it's a good thing. ;)

Nem

Carl N. Brown
October 11, 2006, 05:41 PM
I have a 336W and my son has a 336C. They both keep
factory Winchester under 2" five shot groups at 100yds.
The 336C is just nicer looking, and more care was put
into the final fit and finish.

Current 336W and 336C :
.30-30 Win.,
cut checkering,
20" barrels,
6 shot full-length magazines,
Micro-Groove Rifling (12 grooves).

336W
Hardwood stock,
forearm barrel band,
sling swivels and padded nylon sling

336C
Black walnut stock,
black cap on pistol grip,
fluted comb on buttstock,
forearm barrel band,
studs for detachable sling,
336C also available in .35 Rem. caliber.
336SS is stainless steel version of the .30-30 336C

What you get with the 336C is (usually) a very nice piece of
black walnut and a better polish and blue on the steel. On
the other hand, I will not cry if I ding or scratch my 336W.

trainwreck100
October 11, 2006, 06:58 PM
I'd suggest a CS if you're going the used route...it's the only one I've seen with a button safety...I'm not sure if some of the others have it or not, but I know some of the others don't, and while it appears to be a minor feature, it's handy in the field. Any 336 is going to be one of the most fun guns you'll ever have.

Greg

Gaucho Gringo
October 11, 2006, 07:20 PM
Big 5 seems to have Marlin lever action rifles for $330.00 on sale about once a month. I have yet to find a used one in Portland for less than $350.00, most of the time they are priced alot higher. I am presently saving my money to buy one at Big 5 in .357.

Nematocyst
October 12, 2006, 04:22 AM
Carl,

That's the best summary of differences I've read, and yet is congruent with all the other info I've seen. Thanks.

Carl N. Brown
October 12, 2006, 03:17 PM
Oh, the 336A has a nose end cap on the forearm,
the 366W has a barrel band on the forearm;
the 336A comes (currently) with studs for detachable swivels,
the 336W comes with sling swivel loops and is packaged
with a camo padded nylon sling.

Both 336A and 336W have the hardwood stock, unfluted comb
and no pistrolgrip cap, and the slightly less nice polish and
bluing on the metal parts.

I remember the discount store version of the 336 being
the Glenfield 30A with hardwood stock, impressed checking,
and 2/3 length magazine; YET, I do not see them at pawn
shops.

Did I mention I have always liked Marlins?

GooseGestapo
October 13, 2006, 01:04 AM
Also, the 336A has a 24"bbl. Most are in .30/30, but a few (I've seen one .35 but didn't buy as it was exceptionally "ratty") were chambered for the .35Rem.

My .336A (.30/30) had a gold trigger, and white lines, and inlayed bullseye.
It was the predecessor to the current XLS. Mine was of course blued, with some nice Walnut stocks.

My Glenfield m30 has birch stock, half magazine, and 20"bbl, and dovetailed front sight.
An economy version, but accuracy is top drawer, even compared to ALL of my bolt actions.

rockstar.esq
October 13, 2006, 01:33 AM
I for one am simply amazed that Nem here is considering a lever action that isn't chambered for the long lamented and thoroughly investigated 7mm-08.

http://www.browning.com/products/catalog/firearms/detail.asp?value=003B&cat_id=034&type_id=010

So here I submit to Nem the only 7mm08 lever action I could think of.

Nematocyst
October 13, 2006, 02:00 AM
Also, the 336A has a 24"bbl. Hey Goose, are you sure about that?

Marlin's page on the 336A (http://www.marlinfirearms.com/Firearms/Centerfire/336A.aspx) says 20" barrel. Is that a typo on their site?

Their new XLR (designed to make best use of that new Hornady LeverEvolution ammo) has a 24" barrel.

I for one am simply amazed that Nem here is considering a lever action that isn't chambered for the long lamented and thoroughly investigated 7mm-08.:D

Yeah, ain't that weird? All those months lusting after a bolt in 7mm08, now looking at .30-30 lever guns. Dang, I must be crazy. (Oh, wait, we knew that already. :rolleyes: )

I suspect I'll eventually wind up with two centerfire rifles: one lever in .30-30, one bolty in 7mm08 (or .308...still sitting on that fence).

Right now, I think I'm opting towards a lever gun first. In part for price (I'm so poor right now I can't afford a nice bolt that I'd like), and in part because I think for my more immediate needs (deer in the temperate rainforest v. antelope on the open desert regions of eastern Cascadia), a shorter lever gun may meet my needs just fine.

As beautiful as that Browning is in 7mm08, I probably couldn't afford it right now either (look at that MSRP :what: compared with the MSRP for even a new Marlin).

And, I wouldn't want to cut up a nice, new Browning to produce a cowboy assault rifle. (Guess I could do it with a used one though...hmmm, food for thought .... ;) )

Carl N. Brown
October 13, 2006, 01:53 PM
Marlin made a 336A (in the past) that is similar to their current 336 XLR.

The current 336A is the replacement for the old 30A plain jane model.

Confusing, yes.

Nematocyst
October 13, 2006, 05:32 PM
Carl, thanks for that clarification.

Since you appear to be (at least one of) our resident knowledgable people about Marlin 336's, would you mind expanding your useful comparison of the current models to include the A? That is, especially, how does the A compare to the W?

For reference, here's what you wrote back on the last page about the C v. W:

336W
Hardwood stock,
forearm barrel band,
sling swivels and padded nylon sling

336C
Black walnut stock,
black cap on pistol grip,
fluted comb on buttstock,
forearm barrel band,
studs for detachable sling,
336C also available in .35 Rem. caliber.
336SS is stainless steel version of the .30-30 336C

Carl N. Brown
October 13, 2006, 05:39 PM
The current 336A has a forearm endcap and studs for detachable
swivels whereas the 336W has a barrel band and sling loops and
comes with a padded camo nylon sling standard.

In the past, the 336A designation was used for a 336 rifle
with 24" barrel, to make things confusing.

Nematocyst
October 13, 2006, 05:48 PM
Thanks, Carl.

So, all this leads me to another question: I can understand that the 336C is a different beast than the A & W.

But why would Marlin make two models - A & W - that seem so very similar with only minor cosmetic differences?

Am I missing something? Is there really more difference in functionality between A & W than I'm understanding?

(Hmmm. I'm just realizing it's past lunch time, and for some reason I want a burger and a root beer ... :rolleyes: )

DouglasW
October 13, 2006, 06:14 PM
(Hmmm. I'm just realizing it's past lunch time, and for some reason I want a burger and a root beer ... )

Now that's funny. :D

I've been following this thread since last week...and been keeping my eye out for a local pre-crossbolt-safety 336c since last year! Too bad this one (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=227676) is in Texas...

Thanks to Nem for asking the good questions and to everyone else for providing lots of great, informative answers.

Sgt Stevo
October 14, 2006, 12:44 AM
a little off topic, but whats the best 30-30 deals online? I have a 336, Big five special. I dig it, makes me feel all cowboyish and stuff. $325 is what I paid for it. I wish I thought of that used idea though. Im running low on doe again. Freaken guns cost a fortune. Shooting tommorrow at Sunnyval if any THr dudes want to shoot.

Nematocyst
October 15, 2006, 02:07 AM
Went to my local range on Friday afternoon to shoot my two handguns.

After checking in, before heading out to the range,
I asked a couple of members sitting at a table about their views on centerfire rifles.

I told them that I'm looking around for a good general use, "all-purpose rifle",
and asked them what they would buy.

They asked, "What do you want to use it for?"

"Truck rifle, general shooting, deer, defense...", I replied.

"I'm leaning towards a lever gun in .30-30."

That drew an immediate response.

(Paraphrasing a 15 minute lecture from the "wise" experienced users to a percieved novice.)

"You don't want a .30-30...bad trajectory...military uses .308... .308 will be THE rifle round of the 21st century with in a few years...if not .308, then go with .30-06...range of rounds... .. ."

After a while, I felt I'd heard it all before, said, "Thanks for the advice",
and walked out to the range to practice shooting my handguns.

About ten minutes later, I walked back into the "office" to rent a spotting scope.

As I walked in, the big guy that offered most advice about why the .30-30 was the "wrong" rifle to buy was saying to another guy, "...he wants a .30-30..." with a smirking smile on his face...

When he saw me, he stopped in mid-sentence ... :uhoh:

Whole thing kind 'o left me feeling a little put off ...

Seems to me if the .30-30 has lasted this long, it can't be all that bad,
even with the presence of .30-06 & .308.

I think I'll go eat some more tiramisu and think about this some more...

~N

Nematocyst
October 15, 2006, 09:25 PM
I just learned in another thread (thanks Gaucho Gringo) that Big 5 has a 336A on sale (in my region) for $334. (Normally, $399.)

Even though I'm probably going to be a good boy and wait to buy a used one :rolleyes: , I'm still curious about the A.

So, I'm going to bump this thread by repeating a question from a few days ago.

Am I missing something? Is there really more difference in functionality between A & W than I'm understanding? I've read Carl's listing of the differences in the three versions (above), but I'm still curious about whether those differences make any substantive difference in the gun, or is it purely cosmetic.

And is the A, therefore, a more expensive rifle in general than the W. (Intermediate in price between C & W... ?)

Yeah, I know, I'm probably picking nits here, but I'm just curious.

Nem

Sgt Stevo
October 15, 2006, 09:54 PM
I think it is a bug that lives in a monkeys fur. And other monkeys pick it out and eat it.

thats gross as hell dude.

I bought the cheaper 336. It shoots great. I have a browning that looks good. so this one is for the truck and lots of shooting. I did not see any difference in sites or fininish. Just furniture.

I would buy another if she would not yell at me. She being wild Jeanne. My spouse.

Sgt Stevo
October 15, 2006, 09:55 PM
I think it is a bug that lives in a monkeys fur. And other monkeys pick it out and eat it.

thats gross as hell dude.

I bought the cheaper 336. It shoots great. I have a browning that looks good. so this one is for the truck and lots of shooting. I did not see any difference in sites or fininish. Just furniture.

I would buy another if she would not yell at me. She being wild Jeanne. My spouse.

Nematocyst
October 16, 2006, 12:35 AM
thats gross as hell dude. Yeah, well, I am a biologist. :rolleyes:

There's a running joke among biologists: never take a biologist out to dinner, especially seafood, because they'll tell you all about the anatomy of what you're eating. :D

And yes, "nits" are eggs of a louse.

But in this case, I was just using the old adage about "nitpicking". I don't really eat them. ;)

Nem

zero_chances
December 26, 2006, 08:44 PM
I got my 336w 30/30 for about $210 with no tax at a local pawn shop. It looks brand new, and even came with a scope with "iron sighter" rings. It is the newer versoin with the cross bolt safety. It shoots well.

fiVe
December 26, 2006, 08:51 PM
Nematocyst-870: It warms my heart to find you on a .30-.30 thread. I PROUDLY own a Marlin 336C that I bought used for $150. It is an older model without the crossbolt safety. I'm very pleased with it.

R/fiVe

Nematocyst
December 27, 2006, 02:57 AM
Hey fiVe,

Nice of you drop by. :)

I am not suprised that you own a 336. We have fine taste in guns. :D

Nem

Nematocyst
December 27, 2006, 04:02 AM
By the way, since this thread is a bit older now,
I thought I'd add a link to a follow-up thread relating to Marlin 336 (http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=242785),
with a slight change in focus from C v. W to A v. C.

The main topic has been barrel bands and their alleged impact on accuracy,
but it's taken a few other interesting turns as well.

Yall, come now, ya' hear?

JackOfAllTradesMasterAtNone
December 27, 2006, 01:16 PM
OK, I'll admit I sort of liked the green 336. Glad it was his gun. One comment about doing that to a Marlin instead of a Win94... I own a pre64 94 and cringe at the thought of such a mod to it. I own a 336c, affectionately known as Mr. Lucky, named by my hunting partners, I shutter in my boots, get the runs, my vision goes blury, my pecker shrivles up, at the mear thought of doing that to my Marlin.

It's already a Cowboy Assault Rifle!!! In stock form. It holds 7 rounds. It has open sights for quick target aquisition. With 20" barrel it's certainly not long. And in thuddy thuddy or 35Rem is more powerful than an AK. Why would anyone want to castrate it's power and make it a mear balistic equal to an AK? The large TruGlo red dot looks absolutely hidious on that classic lever gun. (Well, a scope of any sort looks hidious on a lever action rifle.)

It's a free country. Do as you wish.... Uhg!

That guy's a moderator on THR?

If you truly can only have one gun, then just go buy a Ruger Super Red Hawk and learn how to shoot it.

-Steve

SSN Vet
December 27, 2006, 05:53 PM
look for one with tapped holes on the left side of the receiver for mounting an appeture site. Peep sights are a big improvement over the buck-horns IMHO and either the Lyman or Williams will screw on in <5 min. with these holes.

They make apperture sights that will attach on top (i.e. WGRS), but they sit higher up and require mounting a taller front sight as well.

they all come with pre-tapped mounting holes for scope rings on the top of the reciever.....but they stopped tapping the holes on the left side in 2001

pabornsailor
August 22, 2008, 03:35 PM
I acutally pulled this thread up in a searchand joined just to reply to this thread. I am aproud owner of a 336 I bought it to replace one my father had given me growing up hunting in pa. I bought it for 120$ because of some loss of bluing on the lever and around the barrel and broken firing pin. and some raised grain on the stock. serial number ends in J so form what i have seen that means circa 1952 and no cross bolt safety which I like better actually. It cost me 40$ to replace the pin (had a gun smith do it) sanding down the grain myself. and have yet to have it re blued as i am dtermining where I want to have it done. So doing the quick math i have 160 bucks into my favorite hunting rifle. Now as for accuracy lets all be honest here I personnally have never taken a shot at a deer over a hundred yards out however lets say you do. As you probably know or read .30-30 Ammo has gotten an upgrade every lever action owner has to check leverevolutions ammo out. now not to sound like a commercial because in actuallity I work on ships for a living but i tried this stuff out and I am actually more accurate with it then my Colt Ar-15 and my brothers Savage .30-06 I am so proud of my 160$ gun I am looking to perosnally upgrade to walnut stocks and putting some quality optics on it.
So in conclusion I would go to every used gun/ pawn shop you drive by I would walk in ask for a 336 the more cosmeticly beat up the better because it is very satisfying to have a hand in creating such a great tool.

Question someone mentioned something about marlin refurbishing and rebluing at a reasonable price true/false?

goon
August 22, 2008, 06:13 PM
Good choice in the Marlin. I'm working up handloads for mine right now.

Also, I agree on finding a used one. If you're lucky, maybe you can even find one of the pre-safety ones.

Oops - didn't realize that Nematocyst was the OP.
We've kind of had this conversation before. :)

Good choice though.
And why is it that Marlin threads never die? :evil:

Nematocyst
August 22, 2008, 06:14 PM
Pabornsailor, welcome to THR.

Wow, you brought this thread back from the dead. (It's been quiet since December, 2006.)

Glad to have you amongst the ranks of 336 owners.

Please consider bringing your story (just copy and paste)
over to the place where a lot of us 336 owners hang out these days:
The 336 Club (http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=258000). (Don't worry about reading the whole thread before jumping in; it's pretty long.)

Nem

Shawnee
August 22, 2008, 06:29 PM
Everyone talks like the "newer" cross-bolt safety 336s are not as good as the older non-cross-bolt safety models.

What's up with that ? Granted - the cross-bolt safety is a break from tradition but that doesn't make the rifle (or the safety) bad, or even less desireable.

The whole "pre-cross-bolt safety" nonsense is just more gun show dealer hogwash - trying to make people believe their older rifles are automatically worth more. And, of course, plenty of people will fall for that apple sauce.

If you find a good deal on a CS - grab it and be delighted.

And by the way - anyone who "pooh-pooh's" the 30/30 is giving themselves away as an armchair rifleman.... very likely one of the sheep-le who follows any goat that writes in the gun-zines or a parrot who simply regurgitates whatever garbage they read in this month's issue of "Lock, Stock, and Stupid".


:cool:

Nematocyst
August 22, 2008, 07:02 PM
Everyone talks like the "newer" cross-bolt safety 336s are not as good as the older non-cross-bolt safety models.

Shawnee, I suspect the issue lies largely with history.

For those who "grew up" w/o the CBS (crossbolt safeties), and were used to the older version, adding another element to the mix understandably just complicated things. Those were simpler times.

For those of us who "grew up" with CBS - they were already on some of my guns even as a kid, it ain't no thing. I'm used to them.

I actually prefer CBS on my guns, even the Marlin levers where half-cock hammer is itself a safety. If I'm in an area with other people (e.g., camp or range), I like that extra layer of safety.

In a hunt, the safety would go "off" and I'd use the hammer on half-cock. (I say would because I have yet to have my 336 on a hunt yet. Yes, sad but true ... trials and tribulations of being a business owner in a troubled economy.)

As for older rifles being "better" than newer ones, because they were made better in the past, I no longer buy that. I've seen no one produce any statistics that problems caused by QC failures are higher now than in, say, 1963.

If there's a problem with a Marlin, Marlin takes care of it as far as I can tell.

Hmmm. This CBS issue is a conversation that we haven't had over in the club yet. Will make it so soon ...

ECVMatt
August 22, 2008, 07:13 PM
I just don't like them. I was raised on the half-cocked notch and it works great for me. I am sure some will mock me, but I have never had a problem with this system.

Here is a good article for reference:

http://www.leverguns.com/articles/taylor/crossbolt_safety.htm

Have a good one,

Matt

Shawnee
August 22, 2008, 07:24 PM
"I was raised on the half-cocked notch and it works great for me."


So was I, and the "half-cocked notch" works just fine... and it is how I use my 336CS.... for the same reason as you... it's what I'm used to.

Was also "raised on" the "Old Model" Ruger single-actions (before the transfer bar safety). But my new model Super Blackhawk is just fine. Like the 336CS - it's just different. No real "lesser value" regardless of what the gun show lizards try to pass off.

I've had three 336's in 30/30 and the CS happens to be easily the most accurate of them all.

:cool:

Omaha-BeenGlockin
August 22, 2008, 07:34 PM
Not reading the whole thread thoughly.

The "C" gets you the bullseye in the stock too.

jkingrph
August 22, 2008, 11:01 PM
I suggest you shop for a used Marlin-there are millions of them, they are very inexpensive, and you can examine and handle the gun as much as you like before you buy it. I have a1961 336SC (short magazine) Marlin in .35 Rem that I bought for $175. It's very smooth, high quality, shoots great, and is a fine defence weapon in addition to a super hunting rifle. I have added a butt cuff and a Limb saver recoil pad, and replaced the rear sight with a newer Marlin Buckhorn sight, larger so I can see it better. They are excellent "offhand" shooting rifles, very quick to point, fast handling, and a good alternative to the black rifles.
I don't there is any difference in the rifles you mentioned other than the cosmetic differences.
The basic action and the materials are identical.
Mark

SC stood for Sporting Carbine.

goon
August 23, 2008, 01:26 AM
Shawnee - I don't like the crossbolt safety just because I don't like it.
In general, the newer rifles and the older rifles are priced about the same in my area when they're in the same condition. The safety doesn't have anything to do what they ask for them because in my area, a Marlin is a rifle that gets used.

BTW - the safety can be adjusted to make it very hard to put on accidentally or "eliminated" altogether, thus making your post-safety rifle into a pre-safety rifle.
Not sure how I feel about that but if I lived in Alaska where I was likely to actually have to shoot something that was trying to eat me, I'd probably feel the need to do something with that.

pabornsailor
August 25, 2008, 04:30 PM
Guys thanks for the feed back and the kind invite nem I will come over to the 336 club thread I am at sea with limited internet. Anyway to clear the smoke here I agree that the newer 336's are no different from the older models minus sights and the CBS. My preferance for older models is soley based on tradition as i mentioned in my previous post and for price.

streakr
August 25, 2008, 10:07 PM
Ok here's a MANs 336 in 38-55. Not one of those leetle sissy guns. It's a 1950 made 336 rebuilt into a 38-55 with a 26" Marlin Special Smokeless steel barrel. With the Lyman tang and #17 front sight my son can hit 10" circles at 300m offhand. [Personally I can't see a 10" circle at 300m]

streakr

83679

83680

Nematocyst
August 25, 2008, 10:52 PM
Ok here's a MANs 336 in 38-55. Not one of those leetle sissy guns.:D

And good looking it is.

You should bring that thang on over to the 336 club, Streakr.
It'd be nice to have a .38-55 in the house.

streakr
August 26, 2008, 09:55 AM
I did.

streakr

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