oddities of the gun world


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srschick
May 15, 2003, 04:20 PM
While looking through a glossary of firearms (CLICK HERE (http://www.building-tux.com/dsmjd/tech/glossary.htm))

Berdan primer: (n.) Invented by Colonel Hiram Berdan of the US Army in the 19th c., this is the most common type of centerfire primer manufactured outside the USA.

Boxer primer: (n.) Invented by the British Colonel Boxer in the 19th c., this is the most common type of centerfire primer used in the USA.

Isn't it odd that the main primer used outside of the US was invented by an American, and vice-versa?

What other oddity of the gun world do you have to add?

(other than GWB is a "gun guy" :banghead: )

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TallPine
May 15, 2003, 04:53 PM
Not just guns ...

The English use the metric system of measurement

Americans use the "English" system of measurement

Chipperman
May 15, 2003, 05:20 PM
"The right to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed..."

:cuss:

Standing Wolf
May 15, 2003, 06:14 PM
I've never understood why larger guage numbers refer to smaller bores, whereas larger caliber numbers refer to larger bores.

TechBrute
May 15, 2003, 06:19 PM
The number of legislators that lack common sense.

Big_R
May 15, 2003, 06:42 PM
Standing Wolf:

The guage vs bore thing I think I can explain. Gauge means that if you cast a lead ball the size of the bore, it takes that many of those balls to equal one pound. Smaller bore, more balls to make one pound, higher gauge, etc.

Other oddities:

The American style stock kind of looks like a Monte Carlo, but the English style is straight without pitstol grip, etc.

Also, didn't the US have to pay royalties to Paul Mauser for infringing on his patent?

Alfred nobel invented dynomite.

Ryan

bobs1066
May 15, 2003, 06:44 PM
The gauge of a gun refers to how many lead balls the diameter of the bore are needed to weigh a pound. A 12 gauge means 12 balls per pund. A 20 gauge would then have a smaller bore because each ball would be 1/20 of a pound.

Except for the .410, in that case the ".410" is the bore diameter.

And then you had the Velo Dog revolvers, designed to be used by people riding bicycles (velocipedes) so they could shoot dogs.

Whoops, Big_R beat me to the punch.

srschick
May 15, 2003, 08:08 PM
apparently you didn't look at the link I provided:

Gauge: (adj.) A way to describe the size of a gun's bore, used mostly for shotguns. For example, a 12 gauge shotgun has a bore equal in diameter to a pure lead ball weighing 1/12th of a pound. A 20 gauge shotgun has a bore equal in diameter to a lead ball weighing 1/20th of a pound. So, using this system, as the gauge goes up, the bore diameter goes down. This is the opposite of caliber.

Don Gwinn
May 16, 2003, 09:02 AM
Yup.

Also, who used Maxim machine guns in WWI? ;)

Mike Irwin
May 16, 2003, 09:44 AM
"Also, who used Maxim machine guns in WWI?"

Uh, I know this!

Betty Friedan, right? :)

The question is, though, do you know WHY Hiram Maxim turned to machine guns?

Do you know what he was doing before he went to Europe?

Steve Smith
May 16, 2003, 09:54 AM
Berdan primer: (n.) Invented by Colonel Hiram Berdan of the US Army in the 19th c., this is the most common type of centerfire primer manufactured outside the USA.

Boxer primer: (n.) Invented by the British Colonel Boxer in the 19th c., this is the most common type of centerfire primer used in the USA.

Isn't it odd that the main primer used outside of the US was invented by an American, and vice-versa?


What is even MORE odd or maybe not, is that the Berdan priming system is the favorite of Communist, Socialist, or otherwise oppressive countries. GUESS WHY??!!!

Reloaders will have this in the bag.

landon74
May 16, 2003, 10:16 AM
Mike, IIRC, Thomas Edison paid him to quit messing around with electrical inventions, so as to cut down on his competetion. So ole Hiram started to mess with his second love, and in the process developed the deadliest weapon in the history of mankind.

Triad
May 16, 2003, 12:37 PM
The way that the bore measurement in the cartridge name and the actual measurement aren't always the same seems odd to me. I know why this is in some cases, but others baffle me.

9mmepiphany
May 16, 2003, 02:38 PM
slightly OT, but not really...tanks have at least one large and a couple of smaller guns...

the russian tanks of WWII (notably the best tank of the war, the T34/76) rode on "christey supension", which was not completely abandoned in the post war years, only because the inventor was turned down by his mother country...the USA

how about this one?

before the vietnam revolutionary leader Ho Chi Minh turn to the communist for support, he approuched the Americans.

Mao Zhi Tung asked america for help fighting the japanese during WWII and was supported in his request by the american general on the scene, Gen. Stillwell (or was it Longwell). America chose to support Chang Kai Chek, because of his wife's connections in congress.

we could have avoided the vietnam war and had a strong ally during the cold war on russia's doorstep

Mike Irwin
May 16, 2003, 02:55 PM
Landon,

Very good!


"I know why this is in some cases, but others baffle me."

Well, the easiest answer to that is simply marketing. The ammo companies name cartridges to what they think sounds good.

An excellent recent example is the .357 Sig. It actually uses a .355 (9mm) bullet, but it was developed expressly to duplicate the performance of the 125-gr. JHP .357 Mag. cartridges.

jmbg29
May 16, 2003, 06:10 PM
Except for the .410, in that case the ".410" is the bore diameter..410, expressed in gauge, would be around 67 gauge.

Bonker
May 16, 2003, 06:27 PM
I never understood why a .38 is the same diameter at a .357

9mmepiphany
May 16, 2003, 07:09 PM
all .357s (or .36) have been refered to as .38 calibre until the introduction of the .357 magnum...i'm thinking i has to do with a time when the bullet diamieter was the same size as the case. slugs had "heels" which fit into the case and the front of the bullet was "full diamieter" the last remaining bullet that uses this style of slug is the .22lr (that is why .22 mags are a different bore)

you knew that .44 bullets (.44 spl and .44mag) are only .429 (.430) and the .45 LC is .454 as opposed to the .45 acp being .452 right?...

oh and the 38-40 is a .40 calibre slug but the 40 in it's name refers to the original loading of blackpowder

Ledbetter
May 16, 2003, 07:20 PM
So the enslaved people can't easily reuse them, of course. Unless they order the de-primer from MidwayUSA.com.

Also, what's REALLY odd is that Berdan and Boxer were both colonels.

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