muzzleloader (flint) for kid's b-day


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bender
October 26, 2006, 03:38 PM
I want to get my son a muzzleloader for his b-day (january). I already bought him a CZ .22LR Scout rifle for xmas...

He loves the concept of muzzleloaders, and is always asking me about them. Personally, I bought a CVA pistol kit back in the 1980s, and shot it a little (IIRC it was percussion). I want to get my kid a flint rifle.

He's going on 9, so I know a muzzleloader is gonna be quite a handful for him, but he'll be shooting from a bench and with a rest.

I'm looking a spend $250 or less. I'm real surprised at the very high cost of these things. I can't really justify spending so much money on a flint muzzleloader... I'd rather spend it on an AR, or an XD-45, or a .... well you get the picture :)

I'm looking at this one from Dixie:

FR0504 Traditions Hawken Woodsman Rifle - .50 Caliber Flint

its $295. I don't know a lot about what's available out there. Any suggestions?

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motorcycle_dan
October 26, 2006, 04:01 PM
I like flint but it takes a lot of patience and consistance in loading. Very easy to get frustrated. Even with all the proper loading techniques, I have 1 in 8 or so that do not go bang. Sometimes the pan lights but not the main charge. Some times the pan doesn't light.

A good CHEAP Muzzleloader would be better for a young'n.

I'm thinking CVA bob cat or similar. My bob cat is VERY accurate and synthetic stock is wonderful come clean up time. If he lets it fall on the ground during loading, no big loss. The Bob Cat is also smaller and lighter.

Be prepared if you get one, the front sight will have to be filed to get a good point of aim hit. I took about 1/8 inch off mine but now it shoots great. Never once has it had a miss fire. 3" groups at 60 yards are well within reason with patched round ball.

I too prefer flint locks. But not for a young'n. I like them because they are so dang'd ornery. You must have a steady hold and determination to manage a no flinch shot when that pan goes ffssssssttttt right next to your face.

One last thought on a flint for your kid. The rock is sharp, real sharp, he'll spring a leak or two in his fingers learn'n to use it. It's been my experience that MOM will not like your version of cleaning patches and electrical tape as first aid.

bender
October 26, 2006, 04:34 PM
well, this would be more of an "educational" thing for him. Since I already bought him a CZ Scout .22 (5-shot mag), he will have a gun to "shoot for fun". Plus, he shoots my M-1 Carbine and others... :)

He is like me in that he appreciates the "old look"... as in wood, not synthetic...

Even if we take a flint rifle to the range, and we have some "no bangs" ... we would have other guns to shoot for fun afterwards...

I've never had a flint, but I am thinking that if he gets off some shots successfully, it would be like a "sense of accomplishment" for him...

What other flints are available. I know there's Lyman, CVA, and that company that's going out of business (forgot the name).... how many flint rifles are available in the $200 to $300 price range or less?

BigG
October 26, 2006, 04:56 PM
They are a lot of fun and will be a way to bring dad and son together. I bought several flint guns right after deer hunting season for only about 50% of their new price. If that's an option in your area, keep an eye out on the used gun racks right after deer season. Thompson Center makes a good workable flint rifle called the Hawken. HTH

Plink
October 26, 2006, 06:15 PM
A flintlock can be tuned to be almost as fast as a caplock. Some professionals say it can even fire slightly faster. An untuned flintlock can be frustrating though. As a first muzzleloader, I'd recommend a percussion gun because it's easier to master without the frustration.

If you're going to go with a flintlock, I'd recommend hitting muzzleloadingforum.com for advice on lock tuning, priming, flint knapping (sharpening the flint as it needs it) and things of that nature.

I haven't shot any of Traditions flintlocks, but their percussion guns are pretty good. One gun I hear recommended constantly is the Lyman Great Plains Rifle. I own one in percussion and can definately understand why it's recommended. Apparently their flintlock is a very good gun too, although it's a bit higher in cost than you're asking about.

chuck-ia
October 29, 2006, 08:42 AM
If he has his heart set on a flintlock thats what I would get him. You pretty much get what you pay for with a flintlock. I would stick with a Lyman or a Thompson center, I think the great plains rifle would be a bit heavy for a young one, they also make a deer stalker, and a trade rifle. I hunt everything here in Iowa with a flintlock, once you learn the gun it can be very rewarding. chuck-ia

chuck-ia
October 29, 2006, 08:43 AM
If he has his heart set on a flintlock thats what I would get him. You pretty much get what you pay for with a flintlock. I would stick with a Lyman or a Thompson center, I think the great plains rifle would be a bit heavy for a young one, they also make a deer stalker, and a trade rifle. I hunt everything here in Iowa with a flintlock, once you learn the gun it can be very rewarding. chuck-ia

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