uberti 1873 cttlmn question


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akashooter
November 3, 2006, 10:28 AM
i was at sportmans warehouse looking for a single action revolver to buy (waiting to buy one for along time). ive shot vaqueros before and like em, but i picked up an uberti cattlemens with case hardning and i really liked it. only question i have about it is, it seems like i cant turn the cylinder with my hand (like if i were to going to load or unload), but when you manually cock it with the hammer it will rotate (like normal). so i was just wondering if ubertis' cyclinders only turn when cocking the hammer? (the uberti is brand new by the way)

thanks

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DonP
November 3, 2006, 11:39 AM
I believe the Uberti is basically the same gun as my Cimarron Arms SAA replica.

The cylinder should rotate with the hammer at the second (or third?) "click" position when you cock it.

Load one round, skip a cylinder, load four more then go to full cock and lower the hammer on the empty cylinder. If it's like mine, there IS NO HAMMER BLOCK OR TRANSFER BAR. The firing pin is integral to the hammer so the only safety is between our ears.

If the cylinder doesn't rotate with the hammer partially back, it's broken.

Onmilo
November 4, 2006, 12:09 AM
Yep, Uberti SAAs are just like the Colts.
You have to set the hammer to half cock to load or unload the revolver.
With a New Model Ruger you just flip open the gate.

akashooter
November 4, 2006, 08:41 PM
thanks, i went to the warehouse and took it home today. :)

thanks

Savate
November 4, 2006, 10:51 PM
I have one these Cattlemen in the Old West finish (looks rusty and even the handle is worn down).

Looks nifty and shoots great too! :)

Hikingman
November 5, 2006, 12:41 AM
Saw one of these at a large store for $230 the other day. The cylinder was spinning after pulling the hammer back one click. Nice fit and finish!

MachIVshooter
November 5, 2006, 01:03 AM
If it's like mine, there IS NO HAMMER BLOCK OR TRANSFER BAR. The firing pin is integral to the hammer so the only safety is between our ears.

Correct. The Uberti's are very accurate SAA replicas. The Beretta Stampede (made by Uberti, which is now owned by Beretta) has a transfer bar.

The Uberti revolvers are nice pieces for a reasonable price. A real Colt has a little slicker action from factory IMO, but for less than half the price the Uberti's are very, very nice guns. I am probably going to pick up one of their .45 Colt break top models soon.

Seancass
November 17, 2006, 01:39 AM
the Sportsmans Warehouse near me has these for $250. What do you all think of these? are they accurate? or just "good for the price" but not really very good?

Onmilo
November 17, 2006, 09:52 AM
As to that statement that there is no hammer block or transfer bar safety on an Uberti revolver, that is incorrect.
The guns must have a hammer block safety to be legally imported into the USA and they come one of two ways on Uberti revolvers.
One version uses the cylinder pin to act as a manual hammer block.
You can see if your revolver has this feature by pulling the cylinder pin and looking at the end that protrudes beneath the barrel.
If there are two grooves cut into the cylinder pin, your revolver has this safety.
By pushing the cylinder pin all the way into the frame until the last groove engages the cylinder pin lock or until the base screw on a blackpowder frame model will lock into this groove, the revolver is effectively hammer blocked and will not fire until the base pin is again pulled out far enough for the cylinder pin lock, or cylinder pin base screw, to engage the second groove.

The second hammer block version uses a tiny screw located on the left or right flat of the hammer to force a hammer block located in the front of the hammer into the up position.
This hammer block will also prevent the hammer from contacting a primer until the block is again turned into the lower position.

Both versions will allow the gun to be safely carried with six cartridges loaded
WHEN THE SAFETIES ARE CORRECTLY ENGAGED but both are incredibly inconvenient to actually use in a real world situation.

That said, it is still best to forget these safety features are even on the guns.
Only load these guns with five cartridges and lower the hammer on an empty chamber unless you plan on going to a gunfight armed with a single action.

Bart Noir
November 17, 2006, 03:39 PM
With the hammer block that is contained in the hammer, IIRC, it is not actually engaged until the hammer is pulled back just a little bit. Then you can see the block move into position to keep the hammer from moving forward far enough to cause firing, should the hammer be struck very hard.

I get a chuckle from some of the History Channel gun shows about Wild West guns, to include the Tales of the Gun episode on Colts. Sure enough I can see that sometimes they are cocking a Uberti Cattleman, since these extra parts are visible on the front of the hammer.

Bart Noir

paddling_man
November 21, 2006, 12:27 AM
Would +p .45LC or "heavy" .357 ammo be appropriate for use in the Uberti 1873. I am trying to decide if one of the two calibers in this handgun would be appropriate as a woods gun. (I'm thinking of the Buffalo Bore loadings.)

Thanks!

bakert
November 24, 2006, 09:41 AM
"Would +p .45LC or "heavy" .357 ammo be appropriate for use in the Uberti?"

paddling_man, if it was my gun I would avoid the +P .45s in the Uberti. That ammo is rough on single actions other than most Rugers. Regular pressure .45s have plenty enough power for most applications. As far as the .357, any good factory 158 gr loading or equivilent would probably be fine but think I would also avoid the heavy 180 gr loadings in that particular gun for the same reasons as above.

paddling_man
November 24, 2006, 09:52 AM
Thanks, Bakert. That was kind of the impression I was getting but I appreciate the confirmation.

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