Full length vs neck sizing?


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PinnedAndRecessed
November 15, 2006, 01:47 PM
I have a single 30-06 700 Remington for which I'll be loading.

I ordered Lyman full length dies, but someone suggested I might prefer neck sizing dies.

Can anyone explain to me why one is preferable over the other? And if the consensus seems to be in favor of neck sizing, what are the drawbacks?

thanx.

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jmorris
November 15, 2006, 01:54 PM
If the brass was fired out of the same rifle and it's a bolt action, I only neck size. The brass will last longer and some say accuracy can be gained. In semi-autos and lever guns full length sizing is needed.

Sharps Shooter
November 15, 2006, 03:05 PM
What jmorris said – just neck sizing will make your brass last longer and might improve accuracy. The drawback is the neck sized cases fit very snuggly and will probably not fit at all in any gun other than the one they were fired in. While brass that fits your rifle’s chamber perfectly can improve accuracy for target shooting, IMHO, that slight gain in accuracy is not necessary for hunting and neck sized only brass can make for difficult chambering and extraction. To me, reliability is far more important in a hunting rifle than another ¼” gain in accuracy at 100 yards.
There is a third option you know. You can use a full length resizing die to only “partially resize” your 30-06 cases. To do that, you only screw the die down far enough in your press so that the full length of the case necks are resized, but the case shoulders are not set back. But for the reason I stated in my first paragraph (reliability) some handloaders prefer to set the shoulders back just a little bit. And you can use a full length resizing die for that too if that’s your preference. Most handloading manuals have a section that explains how to “partially resize” brass, so I won’t go into it. But it’s the method I use for hunting ammo. It gives me the best compromises for case life, accuracy, and reliability. However, even though I only “partially resize” the brass I use for hunting ammo, before I actually take it hunting I run every one of those cartridges in and out of the chamber of the rifle I intend to use them in.
You didn’t state what you’re using your 30-06 loads for. For targets, plinking, bench rest, silhouettes, etc. – sure, neck sizing makes your brass last longer and you’ll probably have better accuracy. But for hunting, reliability trumps brass life and slight gains in accuracy. Partial resizing is a good compromise.

RyanM
November 15, 2006, 05:12 PM
Neck sizing will result in ammo that's inherently less accurate than properly full length sized. Neck sizing can never be as consistent as full length. You can put out 1 MOA loads with either method, but if you're going for extreme accuracy, full length is the only way to go (or using a very specialized neck sizing rig, and also ensuring that the rounds go into the chamber rotated in exactly the same direction, every time). Also, with some rifles with generous chambers, neck sizing only can interfere with fitting the rounds into the magazine.

PinnedAndRecessed
November 15, 2006, 05:58 PM
Thanx for the input, gents. I was starting to regret having ordered full length dies. (I also ordered a Redding Boss to get started.)

But since my objective is hunting, I think the full length is probably best. For me, anyway.

Grumulkin
November 16, 2006, 07:28 AM
Neck sizing for bolt action rifles does NOT result in hard chambering. I load for mostly single shot Encores and Contenders and it doesn't result in hard chambering in them either.

As for accuracy, most bench rest shooters I've been aquainted with neck size.

PinnedAndRecessed
November 16, 2006, 09:40 AM
BTW, approximately how many times will I be able to use the 30-06 brass before I have to discard it?

I'll be full-length resizing and trimming to minimum length. The gun is a Remington 700 BDL.

Clark
November 16, 2006, 11:22 AM
Accuracy is better for me with full length sizing dies.
Something needs to hang onto the body while the neck is getting resized.
If I don't bump the shoulder back, the brass does not seem to grow much.
I like the Redding full length "S" dies that take a bushing to determine the right neck size. That way the neck brass is not excercised or bent.

I don't shoot that much 30-06; work up a load, sight in a scope, and shoot big game.

Doug b
November 17, 2006, 11:06 AM
PinnedAndRecessed I will echo the full length resized seems to be more accurate opinion.As for# of reloads per case in the 30-06 I have some LC match that has 14 LIGHT loads on it, it all depends on the pressure, heavy charge heavy bullet and you'll start to see that telltale black ring on the outside of the case just to the forward edge of the web area, prior to resizeing that tells you I'm going to bust the next time you shoot me.I've seen this in brass loaded hot in as little as 4 loads in the 06.

PinnedAndRecessed
November 17, 2006, 01:32 PM
Doug,

Where is the "web" on a case?

And, can you give me a starting combo for 30-06? Say, 125 grain bullet? What primer do you use? What powder and load? I don't really like loading max charges, so what do you use?

thanx

js2013
November 17, 2006, 03:46 PM
I heard full length resizing is more accurate in typical chambers which are not perfectly round or perfectly centered with the bore (e.g. off the shelf production grade mass produced rifle), and neck sizing is more accurate with a "perfect" chamber (benchrest rifle made by a real benchrest gunsmith).

I'm a highpower guy so all my stuff is full length resized so it feeds 100% at the cost of shorter brass life. For a definitive answer regarding accuracy go to benchrest.com and ask those guys.

fineredmist
November 17, 2006, 03:58 PM
May I suggest you invest in a Lee COLLET DIE for your .30/06. The die aligns the case as it knocks out the primer and the collet sizes the neck. I use these dies exclusively on all my bolt guns and a single shot. The bolt guns will shoot <.5 MOA when I do my part and the single shot will do the same.

fineredmist
November 17, 2006, 04:01 PM
May I suggest you invest in a Lee COLLET DIE for your .30/06. The die aligns the case as it knocks out the primer and the collet sizes the neck. I use these dies exclusively on all my bolt guns and a single shot. The bolt guns will shoot <.5 MOA when I do my part and the single shot will do the same. A second advantage is that you are not drawing an expander ball through the neck almost totally eliminating gase streching.

Shawnee
November 17, 2006, 10:49 PM
Hi Pinned....

I'm another vote for full-length resizing. 30/06 cases are cheap, often free if you ask non-reloading friends to save their brass.
How many times you can reload a given piece of brass will depend on your load, your gun's chamber, your individual set of dies - which is really to say just be sure to inspect your cases for cracks or other gliches every time you load them. A half-dozen times isn't uncommon at all but, again, '06 cases are cheap.:)

Art Eatman
November 17, 2006, 11:13 PM
I started reloading for the '06 in 1950. I've only used F.L. dies, but I only neck-size cases which were fired in my rifles.

I only full-length resize scrounged brass.

I've always gotten, at worst, one-MOA groups from my various rifles. Often, 1/2- to 3/4-MOA. I don't think it's whether or not I full-length or neck-resize. I think that has to do with the bedding and the particular bullet/powder combination.

All you have to do to neck-resize with F.L. dies is back off a bit from "all the way". I run the die into the press and run a case up into it. I check to see how far. I usually resize about 3/4 of the neck.

I guess calling it some 5,000 reloads over the years would be fairly close.

I used to be picky, getting new brass and loading plinkers to fire-form it to my chamber before neck-reizing and loading with my hunting loads. I discovered it was a waste of time. No difference in point of impact or group size whether new brass or used brass.

Art

Jake in TX
November 18, 2006, 01:26 AM
I shoot primarily mil-surplus bolt rifles. I neck size mostly, with Lee collet neck sizing dies, as it does not require lubricating the cases. This is just one more item to consider.

Jake in TX

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