Texas Home Invasion Leave 6 Dead


PDA






JohnKSa
January 5, 2003, 09:27 PM
http://abcnews.go.com/wire/US/ap20030105_1371.html

Six Killed in Texas Home Invasion
EDINBURG, Texas (AP) - Six men were shot to death early Sunday in a home invasion by four or five intruders, authorities said.
Police said they believe the assailants were searching for weapons and drugs.
A witness, who was tied up during the shooting and survived, told authorities that one of the assailants wore clothing with the word "police'' on it.
Five of the victims were found in one house; another was found in a second house on the same property, Sgt. Rey Ramirez said. He said no arrests had been made.
Police were called to the rural scene by the survivor. Neighbors reported hearing shots fired but did not see anything, Ramirez said.
Ramirez said police knew two of the victims from previous investigations; victims' names were not released.

01/05/03 19:06

If you enjoyed reading about "Texas Home Invasion Leave 6 Dead" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
nemesis
January 5, 2003, 09:52 PM
That location is about fifteen minutes drive from here and there is no more recent news. It's really not unusual here except for the number dead. You must remember that an extremely significant population of the valley are not American in any sense of the word. Local folks often say "well, this isn't really America but it's not officially part of Mexico".

The reality is that the border is so porous here that criminals and crime flow back and forth unimpeded. They mostly prey on each other (Mexicans) and, most commonly, they are trying to steal the other gangs narcotics. The number of Mexicans living here is enormous but this is the Land of Opportunity. The beauty of it is that they can just hightail it back across the bridge if it gets too hot for them.

The population breakdown of the valley is 90% Hispanic, 8.5% Caucasian and the last couple of points split between anyone else. Probably 30 to 40% speak no English at all and a very large number circulate in an entirely Mexican, not Hispanic and not Mexican-American, society.

Many of the criminals apprehended for serious crimes have already been deported by the I.N.S. but that isn't much of a deterrent as they just turn around and walk back across. If I sound disinterested in the deaths of six people, it's because this fits a pattern. These people kill each other on a whim. Life is not important to them and the law is not a serious threat.

The biggest threat to these people would be a controlled border. I don't suppose that's likely to happen.

thaddeus
January 5, 2003, 10:01 PM
More home invaders wearing Police uniforms? This seems to be far too common for my liking.
It seems that we see one of these home invasions about once every couple months, where the home invaders are wearing Police uniforms.
I recall one a short while ago of guy wearing BATF uniforms doing a home invasion in San Diego.

SodaPop
January 5, 2003, 10:03 PM
And its going to get worse.

El Tejon
January 5, 2003, 10:05 PM
Can someone give me a vector on Edinburg? Can't find it on the AAA map.

4v50 Gary
January 5, 2003, 10:05 PM
Glad Texas has a death penalty.

Triad
January 5, 2003, 10:08 PM
El Tejon, it's near Brownsville.

El Tejon
January 5, 2003, 10:12 PM
Triad, thanks much. Found it on 281.

Triad
January 5, 2003, 10:16 PM
El Tejon, no problem.
I wonder how many of these type of invasions we don't hear about?

El Tejon
January 5, 2003, 10:22 PM
Well, if my LE experience is any experience--a lot.:(

JohnKSa
January 5, 2003, 10:24 PM
Any LE's here care to offer some advice as to what a homeowner should do when his home is abruptly entered by a group of people wearing clothing saying "police" on it?

Zak Smith
January 5, 2003, 10:39 PM
Well, a law-breaking home-owner could conclude it's most likely the actual police...

The rest... ?

:uhoh:

-z

Double Naught Spy
January 5, 2003, 10:46 PM
Things like this happen and yet people still question why the Fort Worth convenience store owner's son shot the female cop who was the first of 3 police officers to enter the store with guns drawn and masks on their faces who were there to make an undercover arrest.

Lone_Gunman
January 5, 2003, 10:50 PM
I will about guarantee this is an example of drug dealers killing drug dealers.

6 men in one home? what was it, a frat house or crack house?

Azrael256
January 5, 2003, 10:57 PM
I'm going to have to agree with Lone Gunman here. We don't have all the facts (when do we ever?), but this doesn't seem like a bunch of guys who were just roommates. Really don't know, and they could have been six priests living in the same house, but somehow I suspect that they weren't.

DAL
January 5, 2003, 10:57 PM
More casualties in the Drug War. When will it ever end? The truth is, it won't. Some people are always going to want one thing or another that's forbidden (drugs, guns, freon, etc.) by some well-meaning do-gooder. But hey, it keeps lots of folks employed, and isn't that what it's all about?
DAL

Azrael256
January 5, 2003, 11:05 PM
Well, I just saw the report on the news. WB 33 in Dallas says that the person who was tied up was the mother of two of the victims. Don't know how that changes anything.

JohnKSa
January 5, 2003, 11:11 PM
Things like this happen and yet people still question why the Fort Worth convenience store owner's son shot the female cop who was the first of 3 police officers to enter the store with guns drawn and masks on their faces who were there to make an undercover arrest.
Last I heard they were not going to charge him. As it should be.

As for the people who dismiss this by saying it's criminals killing criminals you're right, but missing the point.

Most homicides are "criminals killing criminals" however, this particular case highlights a problem which Double Naught Spy quickly pinpointed.

If police act like criminals (kick down doors and enter armed and masked) and criminals act like police (wear clothing marked police), how are we supposed to be able to tell the difference?

shu
January 5, 2003, 11:48 PM
Nemesis -
Where exactly was that? I have a rent house on 281 north of Edingurg (although I live over toward Harlingen).
You shoot at the pharr club?

Gordon
January 5, 2003, 11:54 PM
Six less to potentionally vote democrat, looks like you Texans found a way to help the problem fix itself.;)

Lone_Gunman
January 6, 2003, 12:02 AM
Sometimes police gotta kick down doors, guys.

Blackhawk
January 6, 2003, 12:05 AM
Quite likely, Lone_Gunman.

The odds of a druggie digs getting shot up for money, drugs, or merely to reduce the competition are very high.

Random strike? How about close to impossible.

JohnKSa
January 6, 2003, 12:06 AM
Lone Gunman,

That may be, but it doesn't answer my questions.

wingman
January 6, 2003, 12:07 AM
Sometimes police gotta kick down doors, guys."


Only when a life within is threated should
it be necessary to kick down the door of
a "private" residence, "all" other arrest
could and should be made elsewhere,
but don't think we will see this happen.

Bartholomew Roberts
January 6, 2003, 09:39 AM
Caught WBAP this morning and they are reporting that the attackers were using automatic weapons according to the witness. Now whether the witness knows the difference between semi and full auto may be a question.

Steel
January 6, 2003, 11:22 AM
I got to thinking about home invasions last night. It was about 10:00 pm and the doorbell rang. As I alway do at night, I answered the door with my Beretta 96 in hand, hidden. No one there -- weird. I thought how eaily it would be for me to stroll out the front door, get wacked over the head, then a gang of animals comes into my house and has their way with my pregnant wife and son...yikes!

I have an attached garage, so I went in, crawled on the ground, checking for someone under my vehicles [it happens!] -- no one there. I then surveyed the whole property with my dog and gun. Probably just my impatient neighbor who did not want to wait.

Anyway, be careful about just walking outside when someone comes a knockin!

p.s. when a "cop" comes to your door, as to see their ID, not their badge, which can be obtained by most any freak. In Texas, make sure you verify a current "TCLEOSE" identification. If they do not know what TCLEOSE is, they are the enemy.

MLH
January 6, 2003, 12:29 PM
I'm glad they have the death penalty too. I just wish they would do it a little faster. Instead of giving them a cot and three hots for 20 years when they're convicted they should just take out back and do the deed (hang, shoot, inject, draw and quarter, etc.), then maybe the death penalty would have some real meaning.:mad:

Steel
January 6, 2003, 04:02 PM
Instead of giving them a cot and three hots for 20 years when they're convicted they should just take out back and do the deed (hang, shoot, inject, draw and quarter, etc.), then maybe the death penalty would have some real meaning

you got that right -- isn't cruel and unusual to keep someone on death row for so long?

Carlos Cabeza
January 6, 2003, 04:28 PM
Texas doesn't waste as much time as other states when it comes to lethal injection. They have a good turnover rate. As for federally convicted criminals, Tim Mcveigh's actions in OKC helped get the number of federal appeals limited. I think after the gavel hits the wood is when the sentence should be carried out !

TallPine
January 6, 2003, 05:25 PM
If police act like criminals (kick down doors and enter armed and masked) and criminals act like police (wear clothing marked police), how are we supposed to be able to tell the difference?

I suppose when the (real?) police come to check out the dead body.

JohnKSa
January 8, 2003, 12:41 AM
A couple of updates from today's Dallas Morning News. (7 January 2003)

Excerpts from the first article. The second appears in its entirety.


Scope of Massacre jars Valley officials
Authorities say home invasions are common but rarely so grisly
By Brenda Rodriquez
Valley Bureau

It's a crime border officials are all too familiar with. The objective is always the same: Enter a home under disguise as law enforcement officers and take the loot--drugs, weapons and money.

...police officials have said that three to five men in ski masks, and one wearing a jacket that read "POLICE," enered the home apparently looking for drugs and weapons.

...

The mother of two of the shooting victims survived the attack. She was tied up with electrical cord.

...

"It's a pseudo-cop deal," Chief Munoz said. "They simulate police raids, and some of them even wear police attire, and we call those pseudo-cop, home invasion-type of break-ins."

Chief Munoz said his community (Cameron County) has experienced few home invasions in the last year.

...

Hidalgo County and farther north...(are a different story)...

According to the Hidalgo County Sheriff's Department, between January and November of last year, authorities recorded 110 aggravated robberies, of which 60 percent to 70 percent were home invasions.

...(goes on to say that over 10% of homicides in Hidalgo County occurred during home invasions)...

"It's quite frequent that it happens, and most of the time it isn't even reported," said Sgt. Norberto Leal, with the Hidalgo County Sheriff's Department's special crimes unit.

...(goes on to say that most of these crimes are drug related)...

...border officials said home invasions aren't going away.

"It's a never-ending story," Sgt. Leal said.



Dallas Morning News
Police shooting concerns FW council members
7 January 2003
By Laurie Fox
Fort Worth Bureau

FORT WORTH--Several City Council members said Monday that they are willing to wait for Police Chief Ralph Mendoza to conduct his own departmental investigation into a police shooting last week but said they have concerns about the incident.

Officials said that while the matter isn't on Tuesday's meeting agenda, they could ask for a briefing in the coming weeks.

An undercover narcotics officer was wounded Thursday night when she entered a convenience store to arrest a drug suspect and was shot by the shopkeeper's son.

The business owner said that the officer did not identify herself, had concealed her face and was brandishing a gun when she entered the E-Z Food Store on Elmwood Street in the Morningside neighborhood.

Police said the night of the shooting that the officer had identified herself, wasn't wearing a hood and was wearing a protective vest. They changed their account Friday and said they would investigate departmental procedures.

Bao Nguyen, the store owner's son, told police that he shot at the officer fearing she was a burglar.

The officer, who is not identified because she works undercover, was in serious condition Monday at John Peter Smith Hospital.

Police officials declined to comment Monday.

Council member Becky Haskin said she would ask city officials for a briefing on the event. "I just have some serious questions about the policy," she said. Council member Clyde Picht said he's concerned about the msisinformation that police initially released. "This is an issue of integrity and of being honest with the public," Mr. Picht said.

On Friday, officials recanted much of the original version of events, including where the bust took place. Initially, police said the buy occurred in the store. It was later revealed that the store owners had nothing to do with the sting and that the purchase occurred on the street. James E. Crenshaw, 27, of Fort Worth was charged with delivery of a controlled substance and remains in the Tarrant County Jail with no bail set.


Read elsewhere that the storeowner and his son armed themselves with pistols after being advised to do so by the Fort Worth Police.

Ironic...

If you enjoyed reading about "Texas Home Invasion Leave 6 Dead" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!