Get a Utah Non-Resident CCW Permit it's honored in 31 States!


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Maximum1
November 21, 2006, 03:10 AM
Did you know: You can get a Utah Non-Resident CCW Permit it's honored in 31 States! Now that's worth getting.

Hand Gun Laws (by State)
http://www.handgunlaw.us/

Utah Non-Resident Form
http://bci.utah.gov/CFP/ccwapp.pdf

Utah Deparment of Public Safty (look on the right side in the blue section entitled "online services)
http://bci.utah.gov/

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migoi
November 21, 2006, 04:06 AM
the Utah non-resident is considered a very good bargain. Mine works well for me because it covers the states I usually visit when I am on the mainland (except for Maryland where my daughter is in the Naval Academy.)

The ironic part is that the state I currently live in trusts me to teach its children and trusts me to sign the affidavits declaring someone has had sufficient training to safely load, fire, and unload handguns... but they don't trust me enough to allow me to be armed when I transport multiple firearms and ammo to the range to teach the classes they require. Thirty one other states though trust me to walk amongst the public armed.

Counting down until I relocate to the hills of Arkansas.

migoi

Joe Link
November 21, 2006, 05:22 AM
What does a Utah Non-Resident CCW permit cost and how does an Oregonian such as myself go about getting one?

armedpolak
November 21, 2006, 10:29 AM
my FL is good in 28 :)
i need to get NH permit (for $20) to cover SC though.

http://www.bachbio.com/NewHampshireCarryLicenses.htm

raxafarian
November 21, 2006, 11:04 AM
How does a NH permit help you for SC?

SC only recognizes resident permits for those it has reciprocity with (and do they even have reciprocity with NH?)

Many states issue non-resident permits and recognize non-resident permits issued by other states. South Carolina does not issue non-resident permits and non-resident permits are not recognized by South Carolina, whether or not South Carolina has established reciprocity with the other state, because South Carolina law allows recognition only of permits issued to residents of the reciprocal state (SC Code Section 23-31-215(N)).
from: http://www.sled.state.sc.us/sled/default.asp?Category=sccwp&Service=Reciprocity


As far as the Utah permit... many states set the same condition. They only grant reciprocity to Utah resident permits. Check the laws for each state to ensure you are complying.

SJG26
November 21, 2006, 01:27 PM
http://bci.utah.gov/CFP/CFPHome.html

Pay particular attention to the list of certified instructors---find one near you for the test portion!

phorvick
November 21, 2006, 01:50 PM
It was noted:

Utah permit info...................
-----
http://bci.utah.gov/CFP/CFPHome.html

Pay particular attention to the list of certified instructors---find one near you for the test portion!

Just to clarify. There is no test required nor any shooting exercise. What is required is a class on basic safe handling etc. Utah has a minimum mandatory curriculum so most instructors do not reinvent the wheel for their class, they use the mandated minimum as their guideline.

Also, it is good in 31 States ONLY if you are a resident of Utah. New Hampshire, Michigan and Florida (for sure, perhaps others also) require that you be a resident of the issuing State (here Utah), so if you live say in Minnesota with a Utah Permit, your permit is not honored in those three States because you are not a resident of Utah.

It is a nice Permit to get (State application fee is $59, good for five years, current renewal fee is $10) and it and Florida are the big boys of reciprocity. But, the FL Permit is $117 to apply and $107 to renew (also good for 5 years), so it is not was widely sought (unless you must carry in Florida, then it is a good, perhaps your only, option.)

Utah is awash in applicants...takes about 60-75 days as of today to get the Permit. Class costs vary from instructor to instructor, and prints and photo are required also.

obm
November 21, 2006, 02:13 PM
What does a Utah Non-Resident CCW permit cost and how does an Oregonian such as myself go about getting one?

next time you're vacationing in Las Vegas you can take a CCW course:

http://www.thegunstorelasvegas.com/ccw.htm

there are several companies offering CCW courses in the area.

Kontiki
November 21, 2006, 02:14 PM
Can anyone tell me if they will wave the firearm safety course for veterans? I spent 4 years teaching folks how to shoot while I was in and I don't really want to spend the money on a course.

Stickjockey
November 21, 2006, 03:06 PM
...how does an Oregonian such as myself go about getting one?

Oregon Firearms Academy is offering a class in January. They're just outside Lebanon.

PaulBk
November 21, 2006, 03:12 PM
What does a Utah Non-Resident CCW permit cost and how does an Oregonian such as myself go about getting one?

My Utah class cost $75, another $10 to roll the prints, $8 for passport photos, and finally $59 to Utah for the non-res permit. Jim Jacobe taught my Utah class. He is based in Salem, OR.

http://www.jimjacobe.com/

Current wait time has been reported at 4 months due to the popularity of the non-res permit.

HTH.

-PB

BullfrogKen
November 21, 2006, 04:03 PM
Kontiki said: Can anyone tell me if they will wave the firearm safety course for veterans? I spent 4 years teaching folks how to shoot while I was in and I don't really want to spend the money on a course.

No, not unless something has changed in their law lately.

The course is not a big deal. It depends on the instructor, but it has to cover Utah laws, and whatever else the instructor feels necessary to present. I think I gave less than $50 for mine.


If you think that having reciprocity is valuable to you, then get it. If not, then don't. VA won't recognize my PA permit, they will the UT permit. Its worth it when I travel, so I got it.

Correia
November 21, 2006, 04:59 PM
I'm a Utah instructor. If any of you guys want to pay for my vacation, get a big group of people together and fly me out to your state. :D

sctman800
November 22, 2006, 04:15 AM
quote
Kontiki said: Can anyone tell me if they will wave the firearm safety course for veterans? I spent 4 years teaching folks how to shoot while I was in and I don't really want to spend the money on a course.

Utah does not but Florida does. Jim.

Maximum1
November 22, 2006, 03:07 PM
Joey asked about how an Oregonian (this question applies to all non-residents) goes about getting a Utah CCW and how much does it cost.


The application link provided (in my original email) contains what is needed to apply for a non-resident CCW. However, the only requirement that is not clear and it took a phone call to clarify was the training requirement since applicants must complete a firearms familiarity course certified by BCI (Utah). Since this course must be completed before one can apply for a Utah permit I thought since I already passed Oregon CCW certified training and already have an Oregon CCW that would meet their training requirement, it does not. Utah requires ALL applicants to complete the Utah Certification Training…So how does a non-resident get this training without traveling to Utah? There are certified instructions in your state from which you get take this training. Here’s a link to the list of out of state certified instructors: http://www.bci.utah.gov/CFP/CFInstructors.html

Please note: If a local instructor is not on the list then I recommend you contact training center near you to see if they have a certified Utah Instructor. Since Utah non-resident permits are in high demand it may not be too difficult to locate an instructor in your state.

The second question asked was “how much does it cost?”. A non-refundable fee of $59.00 must be included with your application. This fee consists of $35.00 for application and permit processing and $24.00 charged by the F.B.I. to process your fingerprint cards. There is also the cost of the training class which is different.

Here’s another helpful Utah link: CONCEALED FIREARM PERMITS IN UTAH
http://bci.utah.gov/CFP/CFPHome.html

Additional detail on the application processing:
http://bci.utah.gov/CFP/CFNewApp.html


One item of interest: 58% of all CCW issued in Utah are issued to non-residence.

Maximum1
November 22, 2006, 03:15 PM
Quote from raxafarian: “As far as the Utah permit... many states set the same condition. They only grant reciprocity to Utah resident permits. Check the laws for each state to ensure you are complying.”

It's always good advice to check the law in your state….Here's a link which should help to answer your questions regarding States "reciprocity".

Will Utah honor concealed firearm permits from other states and which states honor Utah permits (whether resident or non-resident): http://www.bci.utah.gov/CFP/CFPFAQ/FAQOther.html

Hand Gun Laws (by State)
http://www.handgunlaw.us/

EOD Guy
November 24, 2006, 11:40 AM
A Utah permit is only valid in 27 other states, unless you are a Utah resident. Some states do not recognize nonresident permits from other states.

willbrink
November 24, 2006, 03:05 PM
Been a while since I looked, and perhaps there have been some changes, but I recall if you get an FL non res CCW, a Utah non res gets you 3 more states that honor non res CCW. I have FL, Utah, MA, NH, NV, and MA CCW BTW. A PITA to get them all done, but worth it i feel.

Bruce333
November 24, 2006, 03:16 PM
I have FL, Utah, MA, NH, NV, and MA CCW BTW. A PITA to get them all done, but worth it i feel.What is the advantage of having so many? What point am I missing?

I just can't seem to justify the expense/trouble of getting a non-res permit. My NC permit is good in all the States I have any reason to visit (neighboring States, CO and FL) and many more I have no plans to go to.

willbrink
November 24, 2006, 03:37 PM
"What is the advantage of having so many? What point am I missing?"

The advantage is what it appears: I can CCCW in almost every state in the US. It's as close to a universal nationwide CCW as we can get right now. For some people that matters, and to some, it does not I suppose.

"I just can't seem to justify the expense/trouble of getting a non-res permit. My NC permit is good in all the States I have any reason to visit (neighboring States, CO and FL) and many more I have no plans to go to."

Not being able to read the future, I don't know what states I may visit and like the idea of being able to CCW if I do. I live in MA, so that's my MA CCW. I own property in ME, so that's my ME CCW. NH is so easy and cheap to get, and I have to go through NH to get to ME, that's my NH CCW. I go to FL a few times a year on biz and pleasure, so that's my FL CCW. Being I was already getting all the paper work done for the FL, and Utah is also easy to get and adds additional states, I threw that one in there too. I don't know what states accept NC, but MA accepts none and very few accept MA CCW.

Bruce333
November 24, 2006, 04:03 PM
I don't know what states accept NCAll but 19 of them...

http://www.handgunlaw.us/maps/north_carolina_map.gif

Maximum1
November 25, 2006, 07:48 PM
OK, 28 States, the point being that it's better than being restricted to only one state (the one you live in) and since there are moves afoot by other states to join in the number will only climb...... The need to carry doesn't end just because you just crossed a state’s border.

MartinBrody
November 26, 2006, 12:13 AM
I think this is a good idea if you will be traveling through those states with reciprocity and are likely to carry a gun.

However, doing this is troubling to me on a couple of points.
1)This burdens the Utah system and may slow down Utah applicants who don't have their permit for their own state yet.
2)This has been getting some press recently and from my experience this type of press is usually bad for the pro gun crowd, the media rarely shows this stuff in a favorable light.

Maximum1
November 26, 2006, 02:10 AM
Quote, “However, doing this is troubling to me on a couple of points. 1) This burdens the Utah system and may slow down Utah applicants who don't have their permit for their own state yet. 2) This has been getting some press recently and from my experience this type of press is usually bad for the pro gun crowd, the media rarely shows this stuff in a favorable light.”

1) We should not worry more about overburdening the State of Utah than our personal safety. However, I understand your point about backlog: A current snap-shot shows over 2,600 applicants in BCI’s backlog and the majority of applicants are out of state residents but this is an issue for the bureaucrats to work and shouldn’t be a factor when considering applying for a non-resident permit. Besides, the program is bringing in record revenues so they should use some of that money to add staff. Oh yeah, this is now a money maker for the state: it brings in more money than it spends (supporting data available on the Utah website).

2) With all due respect, who cares what press it thinks...? Our Second Amendment RIGHT is printed right there in the Constitution and I don't believe the Founding Fathers were worried about the Press....so neither am I. By the way, the press made a federal case years ago when states started to pass Right to Carry laws the press claimed it would mean the "Wild Wild West" all over again.... What impact did that have: We went from around 10 Right to Carry states to what 38 now :-) Bottom-line, the gay community aren't too silent about gay rights...Abortion rights folks are too silent about abortion so why should we be silent about a TRUE Constitutional RIGHT…The Right to Carry and Bear Arms?

Please note, this is not directed at you so please don't take it persioally it is for the general consumption of this forum as I believe you're not the only one worried about those two points.

Gary Slider
November 26, 2006, 12:14 PM
Florida, Michigan, New Hampshire, South Carolina and West Virginia are the only states that will not honor non resident permits. All other states that say they will honor another states permit will also honor that states Non Resident permmit if the state issues one.

U.S.SFC_RET
November 26, 2006, 12:41 PM
Maryland won't honor other states and if they do it's news to me.

Highland Ranger
November 26, 2006, 01:41 PM
I looked on packing.org and it doesn't seem to give you anything that Florida doesn't . . . . . .

And Florida permit accepts the NRA basic pistol course - no special attestation required.

Basically the same requirements, I think its a bit more expensive.

So why is Utah better?

SAKOHUNTER
November 26, 2006, 02:03 PM
Good info!

Wyoming will accept a hunter's safety card for the course requirement.:cool:

BullfrogKen
November 26, 2006, 02:44 PM
U.S.SFC_RET said: Maryland won't honor other states and if they do it's news to me.

Sorry for you. I know your situation, and why you have to be there. There are reasons why I fled Maryland. There are plenty of folks who can use it, so let's not look at its benefit through the narrow window of merely our own benefit. In fact, you can benefit from it when you travel, too. Virginia comes to mind.

Highland Ranger said: So why is Utah better?

FL Concealed Weapon Permit
(Out-of-State) New App - $117 Renewal - $107
(Out-of-State Renewal Fee Includes $42 Fingerprint Fee)


Utah Permit
New App - $59
Renewal - $10, no fingerprints needed again


Just a quick glance . . . I recall another reason why Utah benefitted me more when I got it 3-4 yrs ago . . . thought it might be another state or two Fl didn't get me at the time, but that may have changed since.

tyme
November 26, 2006, 04:22 PM
Also, according to packing.org, FL's list of permittees is still public record. Utah's is not.

mljdeckard
December 4, 2006, 07:12 PM
Yeah, don't worry about BCI in Utah being overwhelmed. We'll survive, and they are actually turning a good profit.

rono
December 4, 2006, 10:35 PM
Too bad they won't accept my NRA class certificate. Guess I'll have to look for something online for Utah...

Ron

mons meg
December 5, 2006, 08:19 AM
For my fellow Oklahomans: according to the reciprocity map, doesn't look like you gain anything except Minnesota by acquiring a Utah permit if you already have an OK permit.

Nothing against MN, just I don't have a reason to go up there. :)

learn2shoot
December 5, 2006, 01:30 PM
For those in VA it is great because it gives you DE, which the VA is lacking. If you want a Utah permit there are instructors all over the place. (including myself)

http://www.bci.utah.gov/CFP/insoutstate.pdf

cngerms
December 5, 2006, 11:40 PM
Here's a copy of a Salt Lake Tribune article I sent to my grassroots organization, VCDL, a while back and had posted in their newsletter. Sorry, the actual article is no longer available on the Tribune's servers, but pay close attention to the highlighted paragraph. The program is costing more than it generates! This was the very reason I quickly applied for my non-res Utah permit. I could just imagine some lib legislator, armed with the financial facts, using such information to kill the program. Call it paranoia, if you will, but I now have my permit. BTW, it took 76 days and I just received it in November.

Popularity of Utah gun permits puts hole in budget
Agency calls trend a burden on taxpayers, safety controls
By Glen Warchol
The Salt Lake Tribune
Salt Lake Tribune
In the 11 years since its passage, Utah's concealed-weapon law has
become the closest thing to a national concealed-carry permit, with
six of every 10 permits this year going to out-of-state residents.
A tidal wave of nonresident applicants since January has state
Bureau of Criminal Identification officials overwhelmed and concerned
that Utah taxpayers are subsidizing nonresidents' gun permits. Worse,
they say the huge numbers of out-of-state applicants are robbing
resources from other important public safety duties - particularly
doing criminal background checks on school employees.
"Utah's is the de facto national concealed-carry permit," says Ed
McConkie, chief of BCI, which administers the state's
concealed-weapons licensing. Of more than 62,000 permits issued from
1995 to 2005, 19,000 have gone to nonresidents.
Applying for Utah's permit requires a gun-safety class,
fingerprinting, a criminal background check and $59. An applicant
does not have to be a Utah resident - or even have set foot in the
state - to get a concealed-gun permit. Utah has licensed instructors
in 42 other states and Canada to remotely train applicants for its
permit.
Out-of-state applicants, for the most part, are not seeking to
carry concealed weapons in Utah. Instead, they want to carry in the
more than 30 states that recognize Utah's permit. Utah has the
highest level of acceptance in the nation. Add that to the permit's
five-year duration, low fee, ease of renewal and modest level of
training, and it's no wonder gun rights activists call Utah's "the
most valuable permit in the nation."
"With a Utah permit, a nonresident can carry in many other states
because those states look at Utah's permit system and say, 'It's a
good program. We will accept that,' " says Clark Aposhian, a gun
rights lobbyist and chairman of the Utah Concealed Weapon Review
Board.
Apparently, word of Utah's bargain concealed-gun permit has
spread. The number of out-of-state permits has been increasing
rapidly every year - but BCI has not seen anything like this year's
onslaught.
The bureau projects the number of concealed weapon applicants will
hit 16,138 by the end of 2006, breaking 2005's record of 10,767. But
even more shocking to the bureau, fully 58 percent of 2006 applicants
do not live in Utah.
Many nonresident applicants apply for Utah permits because their
own state's regulations are more stringent or the fees are higher.
Then, Utah's reciprocity allows them to carry a concealed handgun on
their own turf, says McConkie. "It's better to have a Utah
concealed-carry permit in Florida than a Florida permit."
Art Gordon, a gun dealer in St. Louis who has a Utah training
licence, says half the people he trains for concealed-carry permits
are applying to faraway Utah. Charging $80 each, Gordon has prepared
about 200 applicants for Utah's permit. Though Utah only requires
"familiarity" with guns - it's possible to get a Utah permit without
firing a weapon - Gordon requires his students to prove handgun
competence on a shooting range.
"Missouri doesn't have reciprocity with as many states as Utah;
that's the primary reason its permit is so popular," Gordon says. "My
students come from Missouri, Texas, Oklahoma and Ohio to get Utah
permits."
Curtis Oda, R-Clearfield, one of the Legislature's leading
gun-rights advocates, is not concerned by the growing number of Utah
permits going to nonresidents who are trained out of state.
"As long as they are teaching the proper things, the more people
who have concealed weapons, the better," Oda says. "Utah's permit is
the most valuable in the country. We are the standard now and more
and more states want to have reciprocity with us."
Steve Gunn, a Salt Lake lawyer who is on the board of the Gun
Violence Prevention Center of Utah, says he is not surprised about
the popularity of Utah's permit considering how easy it is to get one.
"It's a shame that we make these permits available so easily and
that we don't have more stringent requirements to get them," Gunn
says. "The ease with which one can obtain a permit is not in the best
interest of the public."
Though BCI will collect more than $500,000 in fees this year, the
program will cost $610,000 to administer, according to bureau
figures. Yet, the Legislature only appropriates $88,000 to run the
program. "That pays for about one employee," says McConkie.
"The money [from fees] disappears into that big blue ocean of the
state budget," says the Department of Public Safety's Col. Claron
Brenchley, who oversees the concealed-carry program. The department
subsidizes the program through other parts of its budget.
At the same time, the Legislature requires BCI to process the
applications within 60 days. This month, for the first time, the six
BCI workers who handle the concealed-carry background checks and
paperwork have fallen behind. "We are technically in violation of the
statute," says Brenchley.
McConkie emphasizes the majority of the backlog of 2,600
applications are from nonresidents. "Out-of-state applicants are
driving this dramatic increase in applications. It is skyrocketing."
To keep up, Brenchley says the bureau has been tapping resources
in other BCI programs, including employees and computers that should
be screening teachers and other workers in sensitive public jobs.
"This has become a public safety issue," Brenchley says of the
lagging educator checks. "What is more important, a concealed-carry
permit or checking the background of a teacher?"
Oda, Aposhian and others in the gun lobby say the solution is to
funnel the state's share of the permit fees directly to BCI to cover
the costs of the program. By their math, the state of Utah is making
a profit on issuing the permits.
"There is no way BCI can continue to do this," Aposhian says.
"They flat-out don't have the manpower to stay in compliance."
Aposhian, chairman of Utah Shooting Sports Council, the local
National Rifle Association affiliate, says he would be willing to
raise out-of-state permit fees - if the money went to BCI. "I don't
want Utahns spending a dime to subsidize out-of-state permits."
But Oda maintains the solution is for the Legislature to mandate
all concealed-weapon fees to flow directly to BCI.
"The numbers are there. They have plenty of money to administer
the concealed-weapon regulation," he says. "Yet they are only
allocated back $88,000, and have to rob Peter to pay Paul to run the
program."
McConkie fears any solution that involves increasing the price of
permits or limiting issue to nonresidents could trigger a political
battle between national gun-rights and gun-control groups. "If Utah
is seen as the last bastion of gun permits - it may become a national
rallying point."

FlaXD
December 6, 2006, 07:23 AM
Also, according to packing.org, FL's list of permittees is still public record. Utah's is not.
Due to the fiasco in Orlando - the legislature passed a law this year to take care of that. Of course, Jebbie signed it.

brufener
December 6, 2006, 01:41 PM
So why is Utah better?

Utah gives you Minnesota, Florida does not.

Florida link (http://licgweb.doacs.state.fl.us/news/concealed_carry.html)

Utah link (http://bci.utah.gov/CFP/CFPFAQ/FAQOther.html)

Jorg Nysgerrig
December 6, 2006, 01:48 PM
Oh yeah, this is now a money maker for the state: it brings in more money than it spends (supporting data available on the Utah website).
they are actually turning a good profit.

Can either of you provide a cite for this information? How about a link to the Utah web site?

From the Trib article above: "Though BCI will collect more than $500,000 in fees this year, the program will cost $610,000 to administer."
Even if you take the legislature's subsidy of $88K, they are still running about $22K in the hole.

The cited article is from July, however BCI has a fact sheet up there from September saying that they are still bringing in less than it costs to run:
http://bci.utah.gov/CCW_Fact_Sheet.pdf

From that link:
"the total costs of running the CFP program consistently exceed the revenue generated by the applications. This also includes the $10 generated from application renewals."

"even if BCI received all of the proceeds from the program, and at the current permit fee structure, it would still not cover the entire program’s costs."

Did they publish something new in the last three months to show they are generating a profit?

SJG26
December 6, 2006, 02:03 PM
"To keep up, Brenchley says the bureau has been tapping resources
in other BCI programs, including employees and computers that should
be screening teachers and other workers in sensitive public jobs.
"This has become a public safety issue," Brenchley says of the
lagging educator checks. "What is more important, a concealed-carry
permit or checking the background of a teacher?""

How long before some Anti-Politico pushes the "Public Safety" button as a means to limit/suspend permits for non-Utah residents??

On a lighter note----Utah ALLOWS teachers to be armed (IIRC) - that'll put a knot in Brenchley's shorts...................

xd9fan
December 6, 2006, 04:17 PM
too bad they want fingerprints....I dont trust them with this kind of info. Plus being treated like I'm a criminal......is demeaning as a law-abidding citizen.

Correia
December 6, 2006, 05:22 PM
too bad they want fingerprints....I dont trust them with this kind of info. Plus being treated like I'm a criminal......is demeaning as a law-abidding citizen.

It is what it is. You can either deal with it and get the permit, or not. I'm not aware of any state's that don't require fingerprinting for CCW.

As for anti-legislators in Utah, our CCW isn't going anywhere. Politcally the options I've heard bandied around the most are allowing BCI to keep all of the funds, instead of it going back to the general fund, and to raise the rate for out of state applicants.

wdlsguy
December 6, 2006, 05:29 PM
I'm not aware of any state's that don't require fingerprinting for CCW.
Pennsylvania doesn't require fingerprinting.

orionengnr
December 6, 2006, 05:46 PM
New Hampshire's non-resident permit--no picture, no prints, no classroom, no shooting. Twenty dollars for four (five?) years.

Only caveat is that you must have a permit in your home state and send a photocopy to New Hampshire--seems that they are using your state's permit as prima facie evidence that you have passed the FBI background check.

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