Thinking about a Savage...


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30-06 lover
November 22, 2006, 01:30 AM
I am looking at a Savage Model 16 stainless or 11 synthetic in 308 Win for a hunting gun to be used in the heat of CA and the snows of CO. Savage is appealing to me based on their low price and no frills looks. Do you think it would be a reliable, quality firearm, or not up to the task? Any pros and cons would be a great help. Thanks!!!
-Mike

P.S. I heard that Savage rifles are prone to rust...even their stainless version? Fact or bias? Thanks!!!

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Sniper4Life
November 22, 2006, 05:07 AM
Go for it you wont be dissapointed and excellent choice of caliber. And probably a remington or winchester lover told you that they rust easy, myth:evil:

Crosshair
November 22, 2006, 11:37 AM
Gun stainless steel isn't true stainless steel. True stainless steel is less suitable for guns because of the phisical properties. It WILL rust a little if neglected enough, but compared to regular steel it requires much less maintenance. I had a Howa rust a little once, but it was easy to clean up.

You will also LOVE the Accutrigger.

Essex County
November 22, 2006, 01:51 PM
Absolutely ! The only downside is that you will have more money for Quality optics....Essex

highlander 5
November 22, 2006, 02:07 PM
Savage rifles are very accurate. I get a magazine called"Gun Tests" and almost every Savage they test out shoot the more expensive rifles.Another neat trick is if you wanted say a .243 they are very easy to convert to a smaller caliber. Midway has or had barrels and the tools to convert Savage rifles to smaller or lager calibers. The only limit is action length.

Mornard
November 22, 2006, 02:09 PM
all I can say is mine is wonderful - no rust ever and the smoothest, best feeding bolt-action rifle I've ever owned...

30-06 lover
November 22, 2006, 09:18 PM
The more I read about newer Savages, the more I am leaning toward one. If it was up to you all, would you get the Blued Syntheic, or the Stainless synthetic? I really like the look of the blued better, but this gun isn't for looks, just killing, so I am thinking stainless for the "do all" factor considering the nasty weather CO has. Which would be your pick? Thanks!!!
-Mike

joebogey
November 22, 2006, 09:52 PM
I have the stainless and the only drawback might possibly be the finish reflecting sunlight if your hunting in close quarters. In other words, your prey's attention may be drawn to your location by the flash of light on the stainless moreso than the blue.
As for the Savage rifle, my daughter and I both tagged out this year during deer season. Her with a model 110 in 243, and myself with a model 12 in 308.
Yep, I'm a Savage fan....:D

Crosshair
November 23, 2006, 03:08 AM
For me it would be stainless. Better throat life than regular steel. If I am worried about the shine I can camo it easy.

MCgunner
November 23, 2006, 11:24 AM
How much does that Savage weigh? My little Remington M7 Stainless is a little over 6 lbs without scope. It's so light, short, and handy, love that thing. Stainless will rust if you leave it out in the rain for a year or toss it in the bay...:rolleyes: ...but under normal use, it's much more durable than blued steel and I like the look better, myself. The polymer stock is equally rugged and superior to wood in that it won't cause POI changes with humidity and can take bangs and scrapes on brush, rocks, and such and laugh 'em off. My guns are working guns.

The Savage is a good, accurate, useful gun. I like the M7 for its weight, but I'm not sure what the Savage weighs. My Savage is a standard M110 and it's a big, long action, heavy magnum rifle. I don't think I've picked up a Savage in .308, short action. I can say that little model 7, even with its soda straw barrel, is 1MOA accurate, amazing little rifle. I love that thing and it's all I use anymore unless I'm pistol hunting. It's so light and compact, really makes a nice hunting rifle for all day afield in the mountains where the light weight can pay off and for stand hunting where the short OAL can keep you from banging things in the stand or box blind. If you're just going to shoot paper, though, I reckon that wouldn't matter.

joebogey
November 23, 2006, 01:17 PM
My model 12 weighs a ton with the wood stock and bull barrel. I also have a synthetic stock that helps the weight a little, but it's still a load to carry if you travel much in the woods.
Luckily, I don't have to travel far to hunt, and for deer, I usually prefer to still hunt rather than stalking. So, the weight is not that much of a problem. If I were more into stalking, I'd definitely have to go another route.

I've been considering changing to a standard barrel model, ( still a Savage) but I don't want to get rid of the one I have, and can't afford another one right now. Guess, I'll have to shoulder the burden so to speak until I can get some finances in order.

.38 Special
November 23, 2006, 01:34 PM
As far as I am concerned, the only real downside to Savage rifles are the godawful synthetic stocks. These vary from marginal to complete trash.

Other than that, I'm a real Savage fan.

Davo
November 23, 2006, 01:55 PM
Get a savage and put it in a duramax stock, thats gonna be ny future hunting rig. You will be pleased. Dont worry about rust.

steelhead
November 23, 2006, 01:56 PM
As far as I am concerned, the only real downside to Savage rifles are the godawful synthetic stocks. These vary from marginal to complete trash.

Other than that, I'm a real Savage fan.

Even so, they are more than adequate for minute of deer. My 10FLP, in .308, easily shot 3 rounds @ .750, @ 100 yards, with the Savage Stock. It mainly becomes a problem if you use your sling for shooting. By putting a lot of tension on the front mount, you can bend the stock over to touch the barrel.

More prone to rusting? First time I have heard of that.


Here are some results from my 7mm-08. Remember this is a sporter barrel/hunting config.
http://www.hunt101.com/img/450052.JPG
5 shots @ 100 yards = .601
Bullet: 120gr Nosler Ballistic Tip


http://www.hunt101.com/img/444133.JPG
3 shots @ 100 yards = .671
Bullet: 139gr Hornady Interlock

http://www.hunt101.com/img/450077-big.JPG

.38 Special
November 23, 2006, 02:12 PM
Even so, they are more than adequate for minute of deer. My 10FLP, in .308, easily shot 3 rounds @ .750, @ 100 yards, with the Savage Stock. It mainly becomes a problem if you use your sling for shooting. By putting a lot of tension on the front mount, you can bend the stock over to touch the barrel.
Depends. I've had one or two Savage synthetics that, while ugly and flexible, still produced sub MOA. I've also had some that were ugly, flexible, and banged into the barrel at the slightest touch. These were not MOA rifles.

My Savage Scout came with the single worst example of a synthetic stock that I've ever experienced, and it shot 7 inch groups. I free-floated the stock to the point that there is about half an inch between it and the barrel. Then I hogged out the plastic latticework in the barrel channel and epoxied in a section of fiberglass fishing rod. It is now a genuinely ugly rifle, but it's a consistent 1.5" grouper, at least. I'd have gladly forked over an extra $50 or whatever to have gotten a functional stock, however.

MCgunner
November 23, 2006, 03:06 PM
They make stocks for Savages. My Ramline was cheap, ain't the best, but better than stocks that come on 'em. It was free floated out of the box and shoots very well.

I think the rusting thing comes from the early Savages just after the bankruptcy reorganization. Mine is from that time period, late 80s/early 90s. The bluing is anything, but quality. But, I keep it smothered in gun oil. It hasn't rusted, but I rarely use it anymore and when I was using it, it was in New Mexico and west Texas where there's about 1 percent humidity if that. Did carry it one day in the snow up in the Guadelupes. But, I cleaned it up well at the end of the day.

.38 Special
November 23, 2006, 03:13 PM
They make stocks for Savages.
Not for all of them, unfortunately. Best to verify before buying the gun, IMO.

MJ
November 23, 2006, 04:56 PM
;)
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v130/montereyjack/Sav01a.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v130/montereyjack/Sav02a.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v130/montereyjack/Sav04.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v130/montereyjack/Sav08.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v130/montereyjack/11002.jpg
:cool:

steelhead
November 23, 2006, 05:20 PM
The newer synthetics are noticeable stiffer than the older versions. However, they are still pretty whippy. I don't disagree that they are pretty poor but for medium/large game hunting they are usually sufficient.

All of the below builders make stocks for long and short action Savages. Lefties, like me, have fewer options but the selection is still pretty good. I have 2 Stockade stocks, a Bell and Carlson Duramaxx (converted to lefthand), and a McMillan on order.

McMillan
MPI
Richard's Microfit
Elk Ridge
Bell and Carlson
Choate
Great American Gunstocks
Stockade Gunstocks
Boyds


Another thought is to purchase the Stevens 200 for $199-$259 (on sale) and then replace the trigger with a Basix SAV-1 ($68). You can then replace the stock (same as the Savage syn but in grey) if you don't like it. The only difference between the Stevens and the Savage is the A-trigger, stock color, and finish (no stainless offered).

Worried about the blue rusting? Then Duracote it. Worried about stainless being too flashy? Then Duracote it.


Happy Thanksgiving All!!!

Davo
November 23, 2006, 05:37 PM
Dont forget HS presicion....
Now if youll excuse me my tummy has a date to keep.:p

Farnham
November 23, 2006, 10:56 PM
MJ, that's a sweet setup, what kind of base and rings are those? I have the 10x Super Sniper myself, and would like a setup like that. How is return to zero?

As for the original question, I love my Savage. 10FP in .308 with a heavy barrel and Duramaxx stock. Probably a bit heavy to go humping over hill and dale with in the Rockies (played football once at something like 10000 feet, and would rather be dragged behind the truck than walk at that altitude :D ).

http://www.hunt101.com/img/391379.jpg (http://www.hunt101.com/?p=391379&c=500&z=1)

It shoots, too.

S/F

Farnham

MJ
November 23, 2006, 11:25 PM
It comes off and packed away at the range. Next time it sees the rifle is at the range weeks later and it goes back as you see in the picture. Those are cold groups from three range days last year.

It's over ten years old.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v130/montereyjack/bkt080.jpg


:neener:
MJ

rangerruck
November 24, 2006, 04:17 AM
that is another thing... Savage is about the only riflemaker I can think of, that any joe can easily change out the bbls on , and have a whole new gun. As long as you match up your action lenght with the correct caliber, one simple tool, and you are good to go.

30-06 lover
November 25, 2006, 12:31 AM
I really like what I am seeing, but having a Rem 700 before with similar groups as you have shown, I am thimking about getting the CDL 700. Which would you all recommend...the stainless Savage or CDL Rem? I like the trigger, safety, and bolt handle of the Savage, but the Rem feels a lot better in the hands, has a better ballance due to longer barrel, and I know the rifle. Which would you get? Thanks!!!
-Mike

MCgunner
November 25, 2006, 10:27 AM
I really like what I am seeing, but having a Rem 700 before with similar groups as you have shown, I am thimking about getting the CDL 700. Which would you all recommend...the stainless Savage or CDL Rem? I like the trigger, safety, and bolt handle of the Savage, but the Rem feels a lot better in the hands, has a better ballance due to longer barrel, and I know the rifle. Which would you get? Thanks!!!
-Mike

Well, IMHO, you can't make a bad decision on that one. Just get what you like. That's about the only advise I have on that one. You're the one who'd going to shoot it. I really like the 700 action, but I also like the Savage rifles and they're affordable. If I had the money, I'd go Remington just because I like the tightness/smoothness of the action better and I like the looks and lines better, but that's personal preference and totally cosmetic because the Savage works just as well. I have one Savage and a couple of Remingtons and I'm happy as a clam with my little sporting arms collection. I ain't lookin' for anything else in high powered rifles, got it all covered. :D

I need to take that Savage out and damage my shoulder with it (7 mag). :D Haven't done that in a while.

.38 Special
November 25, 2006, 01:51 PM
IMO the Savage is more likely to be accurate out of the box. If I wanted a decent gun that would shoot well and that would respond to maybe a few hundred dollars of tinkering, I'd get the Savage.

If I wanted a basic gun with which to go nuts, drop a thousand additional bucks, and end up with a real screamer, I'd get the Remington.

IOW, I believe the Remington has the potential to be a better gun than the Savage. It just takes a lot of green to develop it.

steelhead
November 26, 2006, 12:35 AM
I really like what I am seeing, but having a Rem 700 before with similar groups as you have shown, I am thimking about getting the CDL 700. Which would you all recommend...the stainless Savage or CDL Rem? I like the trigger, safety, and bolt handle of the Savage, but the Rem feels a lot better in the hands, has a better ballance due to longer barrel, and I know the rifle. Which would you get? Thanks!!!
-Mike

Remington dislikes (yours):

Trigger: Can be fixed by you, with an aftermarket unit, or by a smith

Bolt Handle: Can be altered but only by a smith.

Safety: Nothing you, or a smith, can do about it.


Savage dislikes (yours):

Ergonomics: Feel can solved with the fitting of an aftermarket stock. McMillan has a Savage stock that is a duplicate of the Remington. Plus there are other stock styles available. Decent aftermarkets start at $95 and go upwards of $400.

Balance: Can be solved, by you, with the swap out of a longer barrel or a new/modified stock. Savage rifles are front heavy because the syn stock is hollow. Weight can be added, to this hollow area, to better balance the rifle.


If you feel more comfortable with the Remington (despite some of your dislikes), than get it. The Savage strengths, over the Remington, are value (couple hundered dollars) and adaptability without the need of a professional gunsmith. If those are of no importance to you - then I see no reason to go with the Savage over the Remington. Accuracy, dependability, and durability are essentially a wash.

However, give this last example some consideration.

Savage 16FCSS purchased in .308 = $455
Savage Headspace gages for .308 Family = $25
Barrel Wrench= $30
Barrel in 243 = $75
Barrel in 338 Fed= $129
Barrel in 22-250= $75
Barrel in 7mm-08= $75

5 caliber total for Savage = $864

Remington 700 CDL in 308= $656
Remington 700 CDL in 243= $656
Remington 700 CDL in 338 Fed= $656
Remington 700 CDL in 22-250= $656
Remington 700 CDL in 7mm-08= $656

5 caliber total for Remington = $3280


Difference of $2416!!!!!

Of course, you could cut down the cost by having a smith swap barrels on the CDL. But that is still going to cost significantly more than the Savage because of increased barrel cost and the cost of a smith to do the work. His labor, alone, will be more than the one time cost of the gages and barrel wrench. Then you are stuck with that caliber until the smith has time, and you have the money, to swap it to something else. I can swap calibers in 20 minutes. Even while at the range if I wanted to.

Now you can see that the value, of the Savage, goes beyond the initial $201 savings ($656 vs $455). That $201 will buy you a really nice stock. Or the tools to change barrels at home, as well as, adding 2 more caliber options to the base rifle.

Let us know what you do.

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