357 rossi - Thumbpiece problem--HELP!


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mg4444
November 23, 2006, 09:59 PM
I have a Rossie 357 magnum...just about brand new...maybe 200 rounds thorugh it so far and operated just fine at the range.

I went to clean it today and noticed that the thumbpiece is malfunctioning. Normally, you push it forward to discharge the cylinder, and by default it springs back. Now but the thumbpiece is staying forward and I have to push it back while pulling the trigger just to get the hammer back.

Hopefully I explained this OK.
Anyone have a similar experience or some advice?
Thanks in advance!

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mg4444
November 23, 2006, 10:33 PM
So I was looking at the gun and HELLO, the little nub at the back of the cylinder was flush with the plate...for some reason the spring wasnt pushing it out...so I put some caps in and dry fired it a bunch and it came out and it working but a bit rough.

ANy ideas? is this normal for breakling in a new revolver?
Am I not oiling it enough?

Jim K
November 23, 2006, 10:33 PM
The Rossi operates just like the S&W in that area. The bolt (the internal part that is attached to the thumb piece) is normally pushed back by the center pin of the cylinder when the cylinder is closed. When the cylinder is closed, the center pin spring forces the center pin back into the hole in the frame, overriding the weaker bolt spring and forcing it back. When the thumb piece is pushed forward, the bolt pushes the center pin out of the hole and allows the cylinder to be swung out. The bolt stays forward when the cylinder is swung out.

In order to work as you indicate, the center pin is either not engaging the hole or is not functioning properly. Look at the back of the cylinder and you should see the end of the center pin sticking out about 1/8 inch. You should be able to push it in. If it is not protruding, that is the problem and it is stuck. If it is protruding OK and spring tension is OK, then the cylinder is not closing enough for it to reach the hole.

That the hammer can't be cocked unless the cylinder is in place is a safety measure, and you are defeating it by pulling the thumb piece back. Doing that could be dangerous. Instead check the gun out and come back after you see how it operates and I will try to help you with the problem.

Jim

Jim K
November 23, 2006, 10:39 PM
I just read your second post. Rather than change what I wrote, I will suggest that you use a piece of brass (a coin will do) to push that "nub" (which is the end of the cylinder center pin) in and let it out to see if there might be a burr in there. You can also try putting a little gun oil (not grease) down beside the pin. If nothing works, the cylinder will have to be disassembled, but based on your questions, I think you might not be up to that right now, so just let's try working it a bit.

Jim

Vic
November 23, 2006, 10:50 PM
There was a burr in the pin hole that was in the cylinder. I disassembled the cylinder and cleaned out the holes and de-burred (polished) the pin. Never a problem after that. It's a no biggie except be careful when disassembling as not to leave marks on the thimble when you unscrew it.:what:

mg4444
November 23, 2006, 10:59 PM
Thanks for the advice...
Yeah, Im probably NOT up to taking apart the cylinder yet, but who knows!:D

Now that the center pin was protruding, I pushed it in and there is some strong resistance...so Im wondering what in the world was in there overcoming the force of that spring tension!

I did notice some metal shavings where the extractor mechanism meets the frame back there. Im applying a bit more oil to the extractor rod and gear plate (I know...its just great how I make up my own names for this stuff-sorry) It seems to be working ok now.

Maybe this is normal for revolver break ins? Never owned a revolver before....

Vic
November 23, 2006, 11:51 PM
Just crappy workmanship. You may be right, there may be metal chips in there blocking or hanging it up. Only one way to know for sure...open it up. The machinist may have not cleared it when he was done. I expect that from Taurus or Rossi (I'd never buy one again). The S&W thing was just a freak accident because they are built quite well generally. You could get a gunsmith to open it up for under $20.00 in my area but S&W/Taurus/and Ruger doubles are my area of knowlege. Just a word to the wise on Rossi/Taurus. The are made in METRIC standard. I haven't seen one hold a 1hole group at 15yds and I was told that the bore sizes differ from American Standard...not by much but enough to effect accuracy. They also use inferior hardness of steel in NON CRITICAL areas (side plates, etc). Had a small Taurus .357 and I was going to do a trigger job to lighten it up. I started to lift the side plate and it bent like 6061-T0 aluminum...it was that soft. As late, I'm finding the more accurate and well built revolvers are the older DA/SA S&W/Colt/and Rugers...that's where my money goes. I'm not saying they are all garbage...I haven't had any luck. Had a .44mag Taurus M44. Pulled the trigger (standard .44mag new ammo from remington). The frame BENT pushing the cylinder into the forcing cone thus locking the gun up tight. I managed to get the cylinder open with a plastic dead blow hammer. Needless to say...I don't own it anymore. You might want to inspect that Rossi and make a decision to keep it or not. You can pick up a Ruger security six pretty cheap these days. I got a decient Colt Trooper a while back (I did have to work on it). I'll never get rid of that one. Good luck...hope it works out for you.:D

mg4444
November 24, 2006, 09:36 AM
All good advice, I appreciate it

I was holding out the prospect that I made a mistake in cleaning it since it was around that time I noticed the issue...Im going to put a few hundred more rounds through and be very careful...see if I have any other issues.

If it seems iffy, I may trade it in at next gun show.

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