7mm Rem Mag or 30-06?


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Blackhawkdc
December 5, 2006, 01:14 PM
Here's my position. I'm currently in the process of ordering a new rifle. I have already decided which rifle to get. I'm going to purchase a new Savage 116FHSAK. That is the synthetic stocked, stainless steel long action rifle with a muzzle brake(selectible).

Here's my dilema though. I'm tossed up between either 7mm Remington Magnum, or the Springfield 30.06 load. What are some pros and cons to both cartridges? Recoil, Accuracy, availabilty, cost (I'll be reloading). Any other attributes? Here's the use I'll have the rifle for. The main use will be Whitetail Deer hunting in Minnesota here. But I also want to be able to use it for moose, elk, bear and also still be able to practice with it at the range.

Both rounds seem to have a good selection of choices for bullets. the .30 cal having a slight advantage. From what I've seen, the 7mm has a slightly flatter trajectory and a little longer range.

What are people's thoughts between these two rounds? Please don't just say one round or the other. I'd like some actual reasons.

Thanks!

Seth Petro

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MrDig
December 5, 2006, 01:24 PM
No question about it the 7mm has better Ballistic Coefficients than 30.06. If you reload you will be able to tweak the 30.06 to get effictive range out of it, that is comparable to the 7mm. The opposite end of that argument is that the 7mm when tweaked will far out shoot the 30.06.
I like 30.06 and like to shoot it so I would get the 30.06. But it really is a Ford Chevy discussion, and boils down to preferance.

Father Knows Best
December 5, 2006, 01:56 PM
Either of those cartridges is serious overkill for whitetails, but on the low end of acceptable for moose, elk and bear (depending on what kind of bear). I'm not generally a fan of compromise cartridges. If you don't have any elk, moose or bear hunts planned right now, focus on getting a great deer rifle (30-30, .243, .270 and 6.5x55 are my favorites), and buy yourself a more powerful rifle if and when you schedule a trip to go after something bigger.

killzone
December 5, 2006, 02:19 PM
7mm STW:evil:

trainwreck100
December 5, 2006, 02:23 PM
I voted 7 mag, but I'm going to repeal that and say 300 Win. Mag. That's the real one...but I shoot a .30-06, I inherited it (old Remington 700BDL, NIB) so it's what I've got, and no, it's not overkill for whitetail, but I think it would be plenty effective on heavier game also if your shooting silvertips. No doubt 300 Mag is a good deal bigger though.

Greg

Shawnee
December 5, 2006, 02:33 PM
Hi Balckhawk...

Do yourself a HUGE favor and buy the Savage rifle in 7mm-08.

Local opinions may vary. :)

Lambo119
December 5, 2006, 02:38 PM
I voted for the 7mm. 30-06 will be more forgiving to the pocket book. But you said you wanted to hunt moose and the 7mm is the lesser of two evils only because it is a belted magnum. In my opinion its still to light for moose.

USSR
December 5, 2006, 03:32 PM
What are some pros and cons to both cartridges? Recoil, Accuracy, availabilty, cost (I'll be reloading). Any other attributes? Here's the use I'll have the rifle for. The main use will be Whitetail Deer hunting in Minnesota here. But I also want to be able to use it for moose, elk, bear and also still be able to practice with it at the range.

Since you will be reloading, there are no cons to the .30-06.

.30-06 pro's: Quality brass available (Lapua, Norma), a wider range of quality bullets, no stupid case belt to deal with.

7mm Rem Mag con's: Quality brass not available, stupid belt on the case, shorter barrel life.

Either one will work for the purposes you have described, I just feel that since you have a modern action and are a reloader, you can load the .30-06 up to it's potential and give away nothing to the 7mm Rem Mag. Recoil and the cost to reload will be similar, and the accuracy will be up to how good your handloading skills are.

Don

AK-74me
December 5, 2006, 04:14 PM
Since you will be reloading, there are no cons to the .30-06.

.30-06 pro's: Quality brass available (Lapua, Norma), a wider range of quality bullets, no stupid case belt to deal with.

7mm Rem Mag con's: Quality brass not available, stupid belt on the case, shorter barrel life.

Either one will work for the purposes you have described, I just feel that since you have a modern action and are a reloader, you can load the .30-06 up to it's potential and give away nothing to the 7mm Rem Mag. Recoil and the cost to reload will be similar, and the accuracy will be up to how good your handloading skills are.

Don

Don, pretty much summed it up in my opinion, when you weigh the pro's vs. cons of the two, 30.06 beats the 7mm mag. in most instances IMHO.

MrDig
December 5, 2006, 04:28 PM
Blackhawkdc, Where abouts in the Northstar, land of 10,000 lakes, and otherwise Great State of MN are you from? and where will you be hunting? Maybe some range time and such are in order. I live in the north suburban area of " da cities" so we could meet up don'tchaknow

byf43
December 5, 2006, 04:35 PM
USSR wrote:
Since you will be reloading, there are no cons to the .30-06.

.30-06 pro's: Quality brass available (Lapua, Norma), a wider range of quality bullets, no stupid case belt to deal with.

7mm Rem Mag con's: Quality brass not available, stupid belt on the case, shorter barrel life.

Either one will work for the purposes you have described, I just feel that since you have a modern action and are a reloader, you can load the .30-06 up to it's potential and give away nothing to the 7mm Rem Mag. Recoil and the cost to reload will be similar, and the accuracy will be up to how good your handloading skills are.

Don

AK-74me wrote:
Don, pretty much summed it up in my opinion, when you weigh the pro's vs. cons of the two, 30.06 beats the 7mm mag. in most instances IMHO.


Ditto. .30-'06 hands down.
Celebrate the "ought-six's" 100 year old birthday. Buy it.

Keith

MRJ152
December 5, 2006, 05:17 PM
I use a 30-06 and reload my own shells also. Without a doubt 30-06. Probably the most versatile gun you can buy from a bullet standpoint. Plenty of power for anything you want to kill especially reloading your own shells. Perfect for whitetail. I hunt PA whitetail, black bear, ect.

However you might want to look at a .308 similar to an 06 only shorter action. Pretty comparable speeds too.

rbernie
December 5, 2006, 05:58 PM
I voted 'other'. For the uses you've described, I'd either go 300 WinMag or 338 WinMag. If you remove the moose or bear, I'd suggest 270.

Terrierman
December 5, 2006, 06:24 PM
There are stacks and stacks of dead game of every description that have met their maker at the hands of a man with his .30-06. It's better for what you want due to the ability to find and load heavier bullets for the stuff on the bigger end of your list. You're not under gunned with a .30-06 for anything on this continent, including the big bears - assuming you're smart enough to pick your shots and hit where you've aimed.

And it really is a lot easier to load well for than the 7mm.

Ranger 40
December 5, 2006, 06:46 PM
The old '06 is a fine round. It will do about every thing you need for eastern hunting. If you plan to hunt western plains game it would have to be the 7MM
Rem. Mag. You can hardly beat the 7MMs when comes to reach.

Lonestar.45
December 5, 2006, 06:58 PM
I think both would work great for your intended use. If it were me though, I'd go for the 30-06, simply because of the wider variety of ammo choices and somewhat lower potential recoil depending on the ammo you choose. Also, 30-06 ammo is usually less expensive and more readily available.

benelli12
December 5, 2006, 07:00 PM
both are great cartriges, but the 7mm doesn't have the range of bullets as the 30-06, and the 30-06 has much cheaper ammo, and has plenty of power.
I love my Remington 700 30-06

umc180gr
December 5, 2006, 07:11 PM
I sold my 7mm mag and bought a .30/06 Remington model 700 and have not looked back since. More economical to reload 06 and kicks less too. My 7mag always just seemed to beat me up. My vote is for the .30/06, over a hundred years old and still kicking whitetail butt.

Schleprok62
December 5, 2006, 08:32 PM
hmmm... 30-06 or 7mm Mag... why not just get a .280 Rem and have the best of both worlds and split the difference??? :evil: :neener: :scrutiny:

Both are very good rounds... each with their own history and reputation... as said before, it's really a matter of your own preference... which do YOU want?

Hutch
December 5, 2006, 10:25 PM
Some hunting buddies and I were planning a hunt out West, and there was talk over a beer that a flatter shooting cartridge than our customary ones was called for (ought-six (two of us), .308, and a 7mm-08). Looking at the hottest, flattest shooting loads for each of the above, and comparing that to a 7mm Mag, we made the following discovery:

It doesn't matter.

I don't have my table in front of me now, but IIRC, comparing flattest (7Mag) to least (.308), with hunting bullets, and sighted in at ~ 225 yards, the difference in drop between the 7Mag and .308 at 300yds was less than 2 inches. I don't know about y'all, but that's well within the margin of error for shooting in the field. No animal would know the difference.

All that being said to support the argument that the .30-'06 is the best, for all the reasons previously stated, plus that one of my own.

Blackhawkdc
December 5, 2006, 11:36 PM
Well, thank you all for all the advice and view points. I wasn't expecting such a good response. Definitely the best forum I've belonged to. It sounds like the 06 has the edge due to the wide variety of bullets available. I haven't made the decision yet. I'll be ordering the rifle the first part of January. I think I'm edging toward the realm of the 06. A couple reason. I already have the reloading dies for it. I've been reloading extra light loads for my father for a while so he can do some practice shooting of his Rem 700 Mountain Rifle. So there are two pros for me. I've already got the dies, and I'd be able to share ammo with my father.

So there are a couple more tid bits of info. Please continue sending advice and opinions. This is a rifle I plan to hang on to for probably the rest of my life. So I want to make a good, solid decision.

Thanks again!

Seth

bowfin
December 6, 2006, 06:11 PM
I am going to take exception to the "more choices for bullets and loads" argument for two reasons:

1. There are tons of different loads and bullets for either cartridge, the difference being one zillion for the 7mm Remington Magnum and 1.2 zillion for the .30-06. It boggles the imagination to think that you would have any lands or grooves left in the barrel after trying just a box of every factory load and a box of every good reload offered.

2. It doesn't matter if you are shooting a .30-06, 7mm Remington Magnum, or a <fill in your own cartridge here>, you can only going to send one bullet from one cartridge speeding towards that deer/bear/whatever. Once you find a great load, the number of other also rans are immaterial, whether it be two or three or 1.2 zillion.

The 7mm Remington Magnum would be my choice, but I hunt antelope also. I wouldn't bat an eye if I were limited to one or the other.

redneck2
December 6, 2006, 06:23 PM
Take 4 sheets of normal paper and stack them together. That's the difference between a 7mm and 30 cal (.284 vs .300)

Whatever critter you shoot will never know the difference.

I have a 7mm Rem. Got it for a 1,000 yard gun because the ballistics were slightly better, and "slightly" becomes "significant" at 1,000

that said, if I were you I'd probably get a 30-06 because I can walk into a hardware store in the middle of nowhere and get 30-06 rounds

actually, what I'd REALLY do is get a screaming deal on a good used rifle in whatever caliber was the cheapest and spend the difference on really good glass. I wouldn't care if it was 30-06, 308, 7 mm, .280. Doesn't mean diddly in the real world if you're a handloader.

YMMV

CB900F
December 6, 2006, 10:31 PM
Blackhawk;

Ya know, the distance card is usually the first one thrown down when a guy favors the 7mm Remington magnum over the .30-06. Personally, I don't think that card is worth as much as Monopoly money.

I've been playin' around with the .30-06 for a good long while now. Know the gun, know the load, and know what your doin' when you stroke the trigger. The .30-06 is just as capable of doin' the job out to any reasonable game-takin' distance as a 7mm anything. Let's say 500 yards, just to put a number on it.

First, get so you can pop a 1 gallon milk jug full of water at 300 yards anytime. That's about the same size as the kill zone on most N. American big game animals.

Oh, and I have taken game, one shot cold barrel, at a laser'd 470 yards, with my .30-06, 150 grain bullet, 2860 fps muzzle. Bullet went within 2" of my aim point.

900F

Lobotomy Boy
December 6, 2006, 10:49 PM
Either of those cartridges is serious overkill for whitetails,

That is only half true. We've been hunting whitetail in northwest Minnesota (up near Old Mill State Park) since my grandpa came over from Sweden about 115 years ago and have been using the .30-06 almost since it became available. This year we got 12 deer among the five of us who hunted, every last one of them taken with a .30-06, and not one of the deer was damaged from too much cartridge (my brother wasted a lot of meat on the two he shot because he was convinced he didn't need to sight in his gun, even though he put on a new scope last year, but that was his fault and not the gun's). My youngest son hunts with a .30-06 in North Dakota, where he usually takes much longer shots than we do in MN, and he got two, including a 12-point buck taken at about 250 yards. My oldest son hunts in central South Dakota, where he takes even longer shots, and he got two with his .30-06 this year. It was a new gun--he switched from the 7mm Rem Mag he's been using since he was 12-years-old because he felt that really was too much for whitetail.

A lot of us also hunt black bear with the .30-06, and we used to hunt moose before the moose herd in NW MN started to go extinct, and I've never heard of a case of that not being enough gun.

All of these things are probably true about the 7mm mag, too, but there is one other factor to consider: probably 9 out of every 10 pickups north of St. Cloud have at least one box of .30-06 shells in their glove boxes. When you get far enough away from the metro area, people become less concerned with Internet debates and ballistics and more concerned with what really works. These other calibers might be dandy, but they know the .30-06 works, and that they'll be able to get shells for it in every Ace Hardware between Coon Rapids and Winnipeg. About the only other ammo that has that kind of availability would be 12-gauge shells.

moody22
December 6, 2006, 11:28 PM
I have did some research because I am about to get one myself, and the best hunting rifle i think is the 300 WSM. It has a big recoil, though. Other than the recoil it is awesome. Too much recoil for me though.

648E
December 7, 2006, 12:00 AM
Recoil and you can't buy ammo just anywhere. Out of the short mags though the .300 WSM must be most popular.

30-06 works great for me, it worked great for my dad, and my grandpa before him on hundreds of deer, and for my great grandpas in WWI.

I stick with what works.

bigcim
December 7, 2006, 12:54 AM
love my 7mm sako

USSR
December 7, 2006, 09:01 AM
...the best hunting rifle i think is the 300 WSM. It has a big recoil, though. Other than the recoil it is awesome.

In a modern, bolt action rifle, you can safely reload .30-06 ammo to factory .300WSM levels if you so desire.

Don

bowfin
December 7, 2006, 10:35 AM
Okay, now I am going to take issue with the other argument most frequently trotted out in favor of the .30-06:

"You can walk into any hardware store and buy a box."

Does anybody here really jump in their pickup, drive 200 miles to an out of state hunting spot, and then decide he better pick up his ammo on the way to the deer stand???

...and unless they have the exact brand loaded with the exact same bullet at the local general store, you will need a side trip to resight in your rifle, as more often than not two different loads will shoot to two different points of impact. As a rule, 180 grain Remington Cor-Lokts aren't really interchangeable with 150 grain Sierra Game Kings.

bowfin
December 7, 2006, 10:46 AM
Oh, and I have taken game, one shot cold barrel, at a laser'd 470 yards, with my .30-06, 150 grain bullet, 2860 fps muzzle. Bullet went within 2" of my aim point.

The difference between your .30-06 load and a 160 grain Sierra GameKing from Federal's 7mm mag load is about 10 inches at that 470 yard range, according to Federal's ballistics charts...

...IF the wind is only blowing 10 mph, which I have seen breezes that calm exactly ONE time where I antelope hunt. Of course, the wind rarely comes steady at a 90 degree fashion in the same, level direction from one second to the next, so even if I had a laser rangefinder and was willing to carry it, I would still want something that slips the wind better.

Again, I would be satisfied taking any one of ten dozen cartridges out after deer without hesitation, but a .30-06 is not the ballistic equivalent of a 7mm Remington Magnum, although 95% of the time it is a moot point.

The previously mentioned idea of buying a good rifle at a great price and putting the saved money into the best scope possible is probably the best advice that can be given.

ID_shooting
December 7, 2006, 11:00 AM
"Does anybody here really jump in their pickup, drive 200 miles to an out of state hunting spot, and then decide he better pick up his ammo on the way to the deer stand???"

Never happened to me, but yes. I have had people show up to hunt camp and realize they forgot thier ammo. The choice was to drive 150 miles back home or 20 miles to the store on the hiway. Yes, they may not have the same brand/make you are used to, but five rounds to sight a good 30-06 in and you are good to 200 yards for most game.

Frog48
December 7, 2006, 11:05 AM
.30-06 :D

marksman13
December 7, 2006, 11:06 AM
I'm a 7mm WSM fan personally. Same ballistics as the 7mm Rem Mag, but less felt recoil, IMHO. But I have lots of guns to choose from, including a .243 and a 30-06, so I don't know which direction I would go if I had to pick just one. Probably the 30-06 though if big game were involved. Not sure I would want to shoot a large bear with anything smaller than a .30 cal.

High Planes Drifter
December 7, 2006, 11:22 AM
quote by bowfin:
Does anybody here really jump in their pickup, drive 200 miles to an out of state hunting spot, and then decide he better pick up his ammo on the way to the deer stand???
-------------------------

You do bring up a good point about preparation bowfin; but that rationalization flies out the window when Mr. Murphy and his law walk in. And It happened to me in Milport Alabama, 6 seasons ago on opening day. I left home with my Dad's Winchester 7mm, and a little less than a box and a half of Cor-Lokt 7mm; I figured that would have been plenty enough for a 3 day trip. Well, the full box got lost (hello Mr. Murphy:o ), and the only ammo I had left was what I had on me. The morning after I lost the bulk of my ammo, we ran dogs. If you've ever ran dogs on deer, you know that you miss alot. I needed more ammo. It took me 1/2 the day to find 7mm ammo, I had to drive to Mobile Alabama to find it. There was a sandwich shop and gas station in Milport that had .30-06. A SANDWICH SHOP for crying out loud.
-----------------------------------------
quote
...and unless they have the exact brand loaded with the exact same bullet at the local general store, you will need a side trip to resight in your rifle, as more often than not two different loads will shoot to two different points of impact
----------------------------

Sure, you may have to buy 2 boxes and resight if the new brand is that far off from what you sighted in with, but you CAN do it, just buy 2 boxes. I hunt with a .30-06 now. The deer dont know the difference. I would like to add- my Dad still hunts with that same Winchester 7mm. Never has a deer been lost thats been shot with that rifle, and very rarely do they run at all. Great rifle in an awsome caliber if not as popular in the hills as .06.

CB900F
December 7, 2006, 06:57 PM
Bowfin;

As a matter of fact, the wind was blowing that morning. It tends to do that here on the front range. However, the cartridge was still a .30-06, and the animal is still dead. Been all eaten by now too. Your point was?

900F

HGUNHNTR
December 8, 2006, 12:23 PM
There is no need to split hairs over the 270, 7mm, or 30-06. Ballistically they are so close you will not tell any difference in the field. The most important thing is you chose the correct ammunition for the game your chasing. People will argue about BC, and one shooting "flatter" than the other. In the field with your heart pounding, shooting off of a rock that .002" difference in trajectory means squat! If you want to hit higher at a given distance.........AIM HIGHER. How far is your average shot anway. Most guys would say 100-200 yds. At that range there are very few cartidges designed for NA animals that have a significant advantage over another.

Just Buy a rifle you trust, Put Great Glass on it, and Shoot shoot shoot

GOOD LUCK!

bowfin
December 8, 2006, 04:37 PM
The cartridge was still a .30-06, and the animal is still dead

...and so is the Indian Chief that Billy Dixon shot with his .50-90 Sharps at 1,538 yards. I guess that one shot made made in 1874 means that there is no reason to use either a .30-06 or a 7mm Remington Magnum as well as smokeless powder, jacketed bullets, and telescopic sights, and definitely not laser rangefinders

Your point was?

My point was (and still is) that the 7mm Remington Magnum is a better long range cartridge than a .30-06, especially in windy conditions, because it shoots flatter and (more importantly) bucks the wind better. I spent too many afternoons at the 400 yard range and too many weekends in the Oglala National Grasslands and Sandhills of Nebraska to let your single shot at a single deer tell me otherwise, or for that matter, the few 400+ yard shots I have made with a .308 or a .270.

Now, I have shot more deer with a .30-06 than with a 7mm Remington Magnum, and I never felt undergunned with one, as "too far away" translates into "just get closer", regardless of what is in my hands. That doesn't mean I can't say that a 7mm Remington Magnum has a noticeable, appreciable edge in longer range shooting.

The 7mm Remington Magnum was one of the few cartridges thought up by a group of hunters (Jack O'Connor, Les Bowman, Warren Page) to fill a real life need, rather than by marketing gurus to sucker money out of hunters who already had a perfectly good cartridge and rifle combination. These three hunters wanted a commercial version of the 7mm Mashburn Super Magnum to reach out and kill elk on a problematic piece of the Rocky Mountains that precluded them from stalking closer than 3-400 yards. So they bugged Remington until they got one in the form of the 7mm Remington Magnum.
I am sure that if Page, Bowman, and O'Connor didn't think that the cartridge was going to be a noticeable improvement at long range in real life hunting conditions, they wouldn't never have bothered pursuing the idea in the first place, and they would have been content with the .270 and .30-06 .

Okay, that's all I have to say about this.:)

CB900F
December 8, 2006, 07:25 PM
Fella's;

As I said, I've been playin' around with the .30-06 for a good long while now. Which means I too have spent more than a couple of afternoons at the range. However, I never met a man name of Billy Dixon there either, guess I just am not enough of a range rat. But I sure did make a number of shots 'at distance' on the range in order to have the confidence to make the shot on the animal.

But ya know, I never said what kind of game animal it was I shot at 470 yards. Matter of fact, it wasn't a deer. But then if ya gotta read things into another guy's thread in order to make your argument, have at it.

900F

Blackhawkdc
December 8, 2006, 07:42 PM
Hey guys, as the one who originally started this thread in the search for peoples' opinions on 7mm Rem Mag versus 30-06, I wasn't looking to start some fight. Each man/woman is welcome to his/her own opinion. Different people choose different things for different reasons. Its the same as Chevy versus Ford. I'm a Chevy guy, and a mechanic. But I also understand that Ford makes a good product also.

So here's what I'm saying. If you want to get in some arguments, please take it elsewhere. If you have an opinion and reasons, state it. But PLEASE don't argue over this. I'm really more interested in facts anyways. If it comes down to it, I'll request that the moderator shut this thread down. Please don't make me do that.

Take it easy,

Seth

CB900F
December 8, 2006, 08:24 PM
Blackhawk;

After takin' a few moments to reflect, I'll return to my original proposition.

1. Know your rifle.

2. Know your load.

3. Know you have the ability to make the shot.

If you know those points to be true, you don't have to listen to anybody else's opinion on whether or not you've got the right cartridge. In effect, the anecdote about the whoop-de-do shot with the blackpowder cartridge makes my point for me.

900F

nemoaz
December 8, 2006, 08:30 PM
It love all these magnum guys who act like we are testing their manhood if dare to suggest that they don't need a belted magnum to take a whitetail deer.

I've also noticed that the magnum boys are usually the worst shots at the range. Just get an 06 or 308 and shoot alot. You may not win any points with the Guns and Ammo commando crowd, but you'll have all the rifle you'll need. Since you are thinking about perhaps going to bigger game, the 06 or .308 will take the larger bullets and can be handloaded to speeds similar to 300 mag.

Handloading and shooting alot (good instruction too if you aren't a rifleman by training) willl be more advantageous than being able to say "Mine's bigger than yours" at the range.

Blackhawkdc
December 8, 2006, 08:47 PM
This just proves my fear. Due to on going, almost deliberate attempts at picking fights, I have requested that the moderators close and delete this thread. I absolutely did not want to provide a place for immature members to pick fights and rip on each other. I must admit, this is not a good first experience for me on this forum.

My thanks go out to those who gave me facts and their opinions in a mature way without ripping on the other guys. I realized that both rounds were very close as far as performance, but just needed help in seeing all sides of the comparison. Much thanks to those who were a true help.

Regards,

Seth

BigFatKen
December 8, 2006, 09:58 PM
I voted 7 mag, but I'm going to repeal that and say 300 Win. Mag.

This is an antique. You can get them for $50 less than the modern .300 SSM The shorter the powder column, the faster the burn and better accuracy.

That said, I'd get an '06 if I'm shooting 180 gr bullets or more. If 150 or less, get a .270 or 7mm/08

mk
December 8, 2006, 11:51 PM
IMHO 30 06 all the way. Although they will both work well for what you have mentioned.

Try shooting each and see what you like best. The 7mm's I have shot seem to kick a little more although both are pretty mild.

Lobotomy Boy
December 10, 2006, 09:34 PM
Does anybody here really jump in their pickup, drive 200 miles to an out of state hunting spot, and then decide he better pick up his ammo on the way to the deer stand???

If you aren't some candya$$ed city boy and happen to live 350 miles away from the nearest metropolitan area, or 45 miles away from the nearest town big enough to have a stop light, then yes, being able to buy ammo at the Hardware Hank in Newfolden, Minnesota on a Sunday afternoon is a pretty big deal.

On the other hand, city boys make the best jerky. :evil:

scott5
December 11, 2006, 12:43 AM
Hello all,
About the debate, just handle both at the gunstore and buy the one that fits or buy them both and let the rifles debate amonge themselves.:evil:

Just my $0.02 worth.
BTW I have both calibers but I have an M1 Garand in 06 so the two can share loads just for fun.:D

RugerOldArmy
December 11, 2006, 01:17 AM
No need to suffer reloading belted cases and limited brass options unless you're hunting in Africa or after great bears.

I think the marginal ballistic benefits of most magnums are of no consideration to anybody capable of shooting at the upper ranges any ethical hunter would shoot, and those who seriously shoot paper wouldn't suffer through 7mm Mag recoil shooting long distances, or consider it a cartridge for competitive long range accuracy.

Savages, however, will let you replace the barrel yourself. Good choice.

.30-06 would be fine for Minnesota hunting. .308 might be better to shoot paper too. To just shoot paper: .222, 6mm PPC, 6mm BR, 6mm Dasher, or 6.5x284 would be better.

bowfin
December 11, 2006, 02:01 PM
Blackhawkdc,

I think the universal standard operating procedure for all threads on all forums is that once a thread is started, no single person "owns" it, (including the thread orginator) although the forum moderators can lock it or delete it at THEIR discretion. Digressing from the thread's original question or subject is considered bad form, but I don't think we are guilty of that, at least until now.

Debating is not arguing. Arguing results in hard feelings and personal attacks, I myself don't believe I have been on the giving or receiving end of any of these, but I am told I do have a thick skin.:) Chances are that those of us on different sides of the debate in this thread will be on the same ones on others, and six months from now, it will all be rehashed again.

My opinions are what I have seen on the range and in the field, which covers the 75+ deer I have shot over 25 years, and the ones I have missed, and the other hundred or so I have seen shot, plus the several (four or five) antelope I have shot. About a dozen of these animals were shot at ranges greater than 300 yards, three greater than 400 (two being wounded by other hunters previously). I also have regularly shot my rifles at 400 yards, being blessed with a range that has a berm that far out very close to home. My single assertation was that both are excellent cartridges, and that the 7mm Remington Magnum has an edge in range and practical field accuracy. Others don't agree, based on what they have seen or did in their shooting careers, which is not at all uncommon when splitting hairs such as this.

My apologies if you found our debates a little to rough and tumble, but the moderators here are very quick and decisive to shut down anything not up to standards befitting a forum calling itself "The High Road".

rangerruck
December 12, 2006, 11:50 PM
http://demigod.org/articles/practical-long-range-rifle-shooting-equipment/
check the mil charts on the bottom of this page, very nice, check out the 260!

ArchAngelCD
December 13, 2006, 02:30 AM
IMO the 30-06 is more versatile. If you don't do your own reloading (like me) then you have to depend upon factory loads. The 30-06 offers rounds with bullets ranging from 125 gr up to 220 gr. Use the 125/150 gr stuff for deer and the 180 gr stuff for bigger game. The 30-06 ammo is so much cheaper and more available then 7mm Mag rounds for the most part. I never see 7mm stuff on sale (not that it doesn't go on sale somewhere) but I always see 30-06 ammo on sale.

Cub
September 16, 2007, 12:10 AM
I've hunted moose all my life and love it! I've shot them with a 303, 30-30, 270, 308, a few 30-06, 7 MM mag, and 300 Mag. Personally if I had to make a choice on my favorite one it would be my 7 MM mag. I've shot moose at 400 yards with this rifle, and it always did the job!

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