30.06 vs .308 Nato on Garand clips


PDA






.45&TKD
December 7, 2006, 01:30 AM
Is there any appreciable weight difference between 30.06 vs. .308 Nato on Garand clips?
Obviously, the 30.06 is bulkier.
Could you carry alot more of .308 in the field?

Just wondering if there are any other reasons to barrel a Garand in .308, other than the cost and availability of surplus ammo.

If you enjoyed reading about "30.06 vs .308 Nato on Garand clips" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Waywatcher
December 7, 2006, 01:40 AM
I think the weight difference would only be noticeable when you start talking in the 100's of rounds. As for bulkiness, 30-06 is less than 1/2 inch longer, so I think you wouldn't notice the difference until you're in the 100's of rounds again.

mustanger98
December 7, 2006, 01:43 AM
Is there any appreciable weight difference between 30.06 vs. .308 Nato on Garand clips?

In my opinion, no. The biggest difference between the two rounds is the difference between the 147gr BT-FMJ vs. the 150gr FMJ.

Obviously, the 30.06 is bulkier.

.30-06's case is .5" longer; the difference between 7.62x51 (.308) and 7.62x63. In Garand clips, you'll either not notice the difference or it'll all be in your head.

Could you carry alot more of .308 in the field?

Nope. No difference in carrying capacity between one 8rd clip and another. Same goes for method of carrying.

Just wondering if there are any other reasons to barrel a Garand in .308, other than the cost and availability of surplus ammo.

From what I see, surplus .308/7.62 is getting to be in short supply. Mostly though, the .308 Garands I hear about are match builds or T-26 builds. Except for those who figure .308 to be more accurate, it's mostly just personal preference and which one did you grow up with.

MechAg94
December 7, 2006, 02:22 AM
.308 in a Garand is only useful if you already have a rifles/ammo in .308 that you can shoot already and want ammo commonality. Otherwise, 30/06 from sources like the CMP is cheaper than .308 surplus these days.

Grump
December 7, 2006, 06:04 AM
Look at the differences in ammo cans, enbloc .30-06s and stripper clipped 7.62 NATO, and then subtract about 20% from the NATO number b/c they are 10 to a pocket instead of 8.....

Skinny can of .30-06 is about 196 rounds, IIRC (4 bandoliers)

Skinny can of 7.62 NATO is, uh, heck I never had one of those....

Okay, fat can of .30-06 is 384 rounds in bandoliers and 7.62...oh heck, I've only had THAT in boxes, 420--no, 460 rounds or so, and NOT in strippers... '06 is 400 in boxes, so that's 15% more but still heavier (more bullets, they are heavier than the "saved" weight elsewhere).

Educated guess: 60 rounds per bandolier of NATO vs. 48 of '06, same number of pockets but the NATO is wider per pocket. Shorter case length gains you nothing by itself.

Something less than 12.5% more ammo is what I think you could carry, NATO vs. '06.

bad LT
December 7, 2006, 07:04 AM
I understand that shooting commercial 30/06s out of Garands can cause the op-rod to bend.

Can you safely shoot commercial 308s out of rebarreled 7.62 NATO Garands?

USSR
December 7, 2006, 09:55 AM
I understand that shooting commercial 30/06s out of Garands can cause the op-rod to bend.

Can you safely shoot commercial 308s out of rebarreled 7.62 NATO Garands?


Nope. The issue of suitable port pressure still remains, no matter what cartridge you chamber the Garand for. For this, you need ammo loaded with the correct burn rate of powder and a suitable weight bullet.

Don

mustanger98
December 7, 2006, 01:29 PM
However, if you use a Schuster or McCann gas plug, you can vent all the gas pressure out the nut instead of working the op rod. So in effect, you can shoot any round you want, but it won't be working the M1 as a semi-auto, but rather as a straight-pull bolt action. That ain't bad either, I think, but you might as well try and find a K31 Swiss action and see about building it into a .308 for the difference it'll make.

Matt-man
December 7, 2006, 02:21 PM
Weight of loaded M2 round (LC69): 399.1 grains
Weight of loaded 7.62 round (Aussie F4): 371.1 grains

With a weight difference of 28 grains per round, you'd save one pound for every 250 rounds by carrying 7.62x51 instead of M2.

.45&TKD
December 7, 2006, 02:42 PM
Matt-man,

Great info.
Q) So how many pounds would 250 rounds of M2 ball weigh?

A) 14.25 lbs? 7,000 grains in a pound? Is that right. Sounds like a lot.

buttrap
December 8, 2006, 01:04 AM
Skinny can of 7.62 is 200 rounds.

Matt-man
December 8, 2006, 04:40 AM
Yeah, 7000 grains in a pound. 14.25 pounds sounds about right for 250 rounds of .30-06.

If you enjoyed reading about "30.06 vs .308 Nato on Garand clips" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!