Primer seating ?


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joneb
December 9, 2006, 01:39 PM
I'm using a RCBS Rockchucker press to seat my primers (various brands for lg and sm pistol) When doing so I can hear a faint tink or click sound. My question is am I over seating ? Is this the sound of the primer's cup separating from the anvil ? I have not had any ingnition problems in 50K + rounds with the exception of S&W revolvers and light mainspring tension.
Thanks, jj

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model 649
December 9, 2006, 02:51 PM
50k+ good rounds and NOW you're worried about it? Seriously though, I've never heard a sound when priming, at least from the primer itself. Has this sound always accompanied priming for you? If the primers are flush to just below flush and you have 50k+ rounds with zero primer-caused failures you're fine.
Josh

Chawbaccer
December 9, 2006, 03:10 PM
While the Rock Chucker is a heavy duty press, I think you would really have to be king konging the handle to crush a primer.

Ben Shepherd
December 9, 2006, 03:10 PM
Most likey the cup pressure spring making a little noise. Mine does if I listen for it. No biggie.

Ben Shepherd
December 9, 2006, 03:12 PM
Chawbaccer- 'pends on if the primers are CCI or federal. You use a *CCI touch* with a federal, you'll crush it. Reverse that and that blasted CCI primer won't be fully seated.

USSR
December 9, 2006, 03:14 PM
jibjab,

When I first started reloading, I also used my press to seat primers. However, I soon moved to a handheld primer seater such as RCBS and Lee make. They are relatively inexpensive, and it is a MUCH better way to handle this job.

Don

The Bushmaster
December 9, 2006, 04:08 PM
Gentlemen. Have you lost your feel or touch? If you can't feel when a primer is seated by the feel or touch you need to never try flying a plane or operating a boat by the seat of your pants.:D I really don't understand why people like the hand priming tools. May be good for reloading at the range,but...I've been priming all my rifle, revolver and pistol cases on a Lee single stage press using a priming die by Lee for over 20 years (same Lee press). I can tell by the feel (or sound) when a primer has seated and/or armed itself.

The sound you hear is the primer hitting the bottom of the pocket or arming itself (as stated above). Most primer pockets are smaller at the rim then they are at the bottom of the pocket. Hence the click, snap or tic when seated...:evil:

Cosmoline
December 9, 2006, 04:14 PM
I hand prime anything important. It's just not worth the risk of a crushed primer.

The Bushmaster
December 9, 2006, 04:28 PM
The only time I have "crushed" a primer is when the occasional primer tries to go in sideways. Not often, but it does happen. Let me say...I don't have anything against hand priming tools. I just don't understand what happened to everyones ability to "feel". The human finger is able to tell the difference of .001 of an inch of thickness from one edge to another and that's with 40+ years of caluses. I have the distinct "feeling" that a lot of these guys are priming sitting in front of their TV and that scares me. I have to shoot next to them at the range.:eek:

Ben Shepherd
December 9, 2006, 04:35 PM
I'll use a hand primer IF that's all I'm doing. The feel/touch is better, and it is faster. Shoter stroke to accomplish the task. Over the course of a couple thousand primers, that is a lot of saved motion and time.

I do prefer federal primers, they are the easiest to feel IME. And they work very well for me too.

bakert
December 9, 2006, 05:33 PM
I agree with Ben Shepherd on the hand primer. Although I have at times used the press I prefer the Lee hand primer with mostly Winchester but occasionally CCIs because those are what's most available in my area.

Crimp
December 9, 2006, 07:35 PM
Gentlemen. Have you lost your feel or touch? If you can't feel when a primer is seated by the feel or touch you need to never try flying a plane or operating a boat by the seat of your pants. I really don't understand why people like the hand priming tools. May be good for reloading at the range,but...I've been priming all my rifle, revolver and pistol cases on a Lee single stage press using a priming die by Lee for over 20 years (same Lee press). I can tell by the feel (or sound) when a primer has seated and/or armed itself. --Bushmaster

I believe you! The difference, IMHO, is very few people are using priming dies and many are "priming on the downstroke" into a primer cup attachment. The difference in feel is distinct. My 4-hole Lee turret is full, so I prime with a hand primer. I don't believe it would be possible to crush a primer with one, and I have taken the controls of aircraft and boats without hurting anyone. :cool: Nevertheless, I don't have room on the bench for a separate press for a priming die.:)

Ol` Joe
December 10, 2006, 11:29 AM
I have the distinct "feeling" that a lot of these guys are priming sitting in front of their TV and that scares me. I have to shoot next to them at the range.

Just for kicks why does this scare you?
A improper primed load will either go off when fired or fail to fire. A high one may occure but with the feel of a Lee or other hand tool it should be no more common then short stroking one on your press. As long as the powder measuring, bullet seating, ect is done in a proper atmosphere the primer will either be backwards, not deep enough (won`t fire) or properly seated and all`s well. I can run a finger over a tray of upside down cases and tell in a instant if any are too high or backward. Inspection of our loads should be a part of everyones regime. Quality control isn`t just for the factories and we need to check primers, crimps, seating depth, ect the same as they do. Just because your loads ran off a 650 with no jams or hic-ups doesn`t mean they`re perfect.
I am not advocating reloading while distracted but I know of a lot of reloaders that do prime with hand tools while watching the tube.:D

The Bushmaster
December 10, 2006, 12:20 PM
Ol' Joe...My feeling is that if they will split the time between TV and priming cases, they will also split the time doing two different things when loading those cases. They might not, but....

When I sit down to do anything with my firearms or reloading cartridges I give 100% to that project. In my case, for good reason. I'm single minded.:D And I strive for the best end product I can manufacture on the equipment that I have. It's paid off for me. I have not had one miss fire, not one squib, not one bullet stuck in a barrel and all have gone down range. And that's over 20 years reloading. When I was still working on other's machinery I applied the same principle.

Yes...Everytime I read or hear where someone is priming cases while watching TV I cringe...:(

280PLUS
December 10, 2006, 04:49 PM
Funny, I'm using an old Dillon 450 jr with the single primer cup that primes on the upstroke and I have had it "flip" the primer in there due to what appears to be a little hitch or click in the process. I've put them in both sideways and backwards because of this. I've learned to use a slower motion and haven't had a problem since.

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