Dumb Question, But I Have A Point I'm Trying To Prove.


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DogBonz
December 19, 2006, 11:08 AM
Does anyone know how much a NIB Colt 1911 Pre WWII, or a Win model 70 would retail for in, say, 1940? Or, for that matter, any popular gun that is still made today.

The reason that I ask is that a coworker and I were discussing the cost of guns. He was complaining about how much more expensive guns are, and “they sure don’t make’em like they used to”. I do agree that they are not made like the used to, but I got to thinking, and I’m betting that if you do a present value calculation using the MSRP of a gun from the 40’s or 50’, or even the 60’s, that they would be more expensive in their day’s dollars than say a new Kimber or Model 70.

As always, any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

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earplug
December 19, 2006, 12:25 PM
I recall reading that A $20.00 gold piece would buy a Colt.
Thats about $640.00 in todays dollars.

Phil DeGraves
December 19, 2006, 12:46 PM
According to my 1940 Shooters Bible, the standard Colt "Gubmint" is listed as being $41.75. The National Match Target Grade is $45.25 with fixed sights and $50.25 with adjustable sights. A Colt SAA is $37.75. I don't know what the inflation rate is, but comparing from the costs of things when I was a kid to now, it seems it is about the same cost (measured in amount of hours worked) now as it was then.

Phil DeGraves
December 19, 2006, 12:51 PM
A Winchester M70 sans sights is $61.80. It would seem to me that the M70 is actually LESS now than then.

Frandy
December 19, 2006, 12:55 PM
I don't know how accurate this "inflation rate" calculator is, but if it is accurate, today's guns Colts are more expensive:

http://www.dollartimes.com/calculators/inflation.htm

From the calculation:
$41.75 in 1940 had about the same buying power as $595.61 in 2006.
Annual inflation over this period was about 4.11%.

And another way of calculating (only goes up to 2005):

http://www.measuringworth.com/calculators/compare/
In 2005, $41.75 from 1940 is worth:

$581.17 using the Consumer Price Index
$479.81 using the GDP deflator
$1,210.90 using the unskilled wage
$2,286.20 using the nominal GDP per capita
$5,128.50 using the relative share of GDP

Phil DeGraves
December 19, 2006, 12:57 PM
The cost of everything else in the early sixties was about 1/10 what it is today. $20,000 for a house then, $200,000 today. $2400 for a car then, $24000 today. Gasoline at 22 cents a gallon, you get the idea. For the
1940s, it may be closer to 15 or 20 times the cost then, to match today. In that case, most of the prices in the 1940 Shooters Bible in 40s dollars are just about the same as today's prices at today's dollars.

Phil DeGraves
December 19, 2006, 01:04 PM
Using that calculator, a new Standard model 1911 would be around $600. Since the Kimber Custom 2 in blue is about $600 new, I would say, it is roughly the same (except for Colt's SAA).

c_yeager
December 19, 2006, 03:11 PM
A lot of stuff is the same price. Some items, particularly those that have been outsourced or have had some "improvements" in manufacturing process are quite a bit cheaper than they used to be.

This is especially apparent if you look at some more newly developed price-point weapons, like our current crop of lower-end pump shotguns. I dont think you could get a gun that worked so well for such a price back in the first half of the 21st century. The same could be said for pistols. They did have cheap pistols back then, but they had a tendancy to explode in the shooter's hand and were hard pressed to hit the broad side of a barn from the inside. Today they are ample cheap pistols that probably sold for the equivalent of what cheap pistols sold for back then, but our pistols do actually work pretty well and almost certainly wont injure the shooter.

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