Hornady L-N-L AP Strong Mount


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bobhead
December 20, 2006, 06:13 PM
I just bought a Hornady L-N-L AP and I'm looking at how I want to mount it on my bench. I think I would like to mount it on something like the Dillon Strong Mount. It doesn't look like Hornady sells one specifically for this press. Has anyone ever mounted a Hornady to a Dillon Strong Mount? Built their own? Any advice would be appreciated.

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Idano
December 20, 2006, 07:52 PM
bobhead are you looking for height or just a solid mount? If you're just looking for a solid mount you could do what I have done, mounted my presses, powder stand and case trimmer on a 1/4" plate and bolted the plate to the bench. Neither my Hornady nor my RCBS Rock Chuck have any movement in them, but if you want more height you need to custom build a mount or try modifying a the Dillon Strong Mount. However, if you have a case feeder watch out high high you go, my press is mounted 34" above the floor and I still need a step stool to change out the case feeder plate. Here is a picture of my setup:
http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=48336&d=1164272919

bobhead
December 20, 2006, 08:25 PM
I'm hoping I can go high and back. I like to load standing up and the down-stroke on the L-N-L is too low to be comfortable if I mount the press on the bench surface. I would also like to mount the press high enough so that the bottom of the linkage will clear the bench and allow me to set the press back on the bench. I am worried that any mount that high will flex and will, as you point out, put the case feeder very high.

DILLONHELP
December 21, 2006, 01:51 PM
The RL550 strongmount raises the loader 8 1/4" above the bench top. If this provides sufficient clearance, then it would be easy to attach a square plate to the top, then drill it to attach your Hornady loader to it.:cool:

DaveInFloweryBranchGA
December 21, 2006, 04:11 PM
bobhead,

Before you pay high prices for a hunk of sheetmetal, here's an example of one made out of scrap oak/hardwood you can make yourself:

http://www.zjstech.net/~ddixson/Reloading%20Bench%20030.jpg

http://www.zjstech.net/~ddixson/Reloading%20Bench%20031.jpg

I made this in about 45 minutes, just piddling around using glue and deck screws. The most time consuming part was pre drilling the screw holes so the hardwood doesn't split. Easy to do and very solid.

Regards,

Dave

Idano
December 21, 2006, 07:28 PM
Dave:

That looks great, fantastic idea!. I like the idea of getting the press up higher, but I am concerned with the height of the case feeder that I notice you don't have installed.

Bob:

I just measured the height of my case feeder and with the press mounted at 34" from the floor the top of the case feeder is at 6' from the floor.

DaveInFloweryBranchGA
December 21, 2006, 11:19 PM
Idano,

Yep, one has to do the math related to floor vs. ceiling height. These pictures were taken quite a while back, but the idea is there. And one can shorten any sort of metallic tubing if one isn't afraid to alter the press.

Regards,

Dave

Idano
December 22, 2006, 01:58 AM
Dave,

I considered purchasing a spare case feeder support rod and feeder tubes and experiment with cutting down the height. However, after looking at how and where Hornady started the bend I think I would be better off and easier just getting some 1"x1" tubing and welding a shorter Z-bar. I measured the feed tubes and they are 16" long so halving them I could raise my press 34" + 8" = 42" and keep my case feeder at the same height 6' and still have enough capacity in the tubes to hold five 30-06 casings. How high do you have your press mounted from the floor?

bobhead
December 22, 2006, 02:17 AM
Dave,

Nice looking mount. Do you think you lost much stability/rigidity with this approach?

It looks like I would need about 9.5" of height for the ram to clear the bench top but you went a little higher. Was that just a personal preference or did you find that you needed the press that high?

Thanks,
Bob

DaveInFloweryBranchGA
December 22, 2006, 08:18 AM
Idano,

"How high do you have your press mounted from the floor?"

42 1/2" from the floor. The "strong mount" is 13" tall. Mine is setup for me to sit on one of those four legged barstools Sam's Club sells, as my knees are shot from stuff I did in the Service once upon a time. After looking at mine from a standing perspective, you'd probably be fine with the same height as mine, though a bit taller would be desireable.


Bob,

"Nice looking mount. Do you think you lost much stability/rigidity with this approach?"

I didn't lose any. The basic frame has 1" thick oak stock and the rear has 1/2" stock used across the frame to create ridgidity. Look close and you can see the back support. I could stand on this thing and it wouldn't wiggle and I'm 6" and well over 200 pounds.

"It looks like I would need about 9.5" of height for the ram to clear the bench top but you went a little higher. Was that just a personal preference or did you find that you needed the press that high?"

I went 13", but that's simply where I needed it height wise for me to sit on a stool in a "semi-standing" position and be comfortable operating the press. You could go shorter or longer. Depending on your situation, height, etc., you want to try and get the setup as ergonomic as possible. And like Idano said, height is a consideration with a casefeeder. I don't run a casefeeder, but then, I'm not competing and reload as much for accuracy as for quantity nowadays.

Some relavent information:

1. I used scraps of rough cut offs (was oak, but any of the harder hardwoods such as maple would do) I got from a local hardwood retailer. They were only finished smooth on one side, so I turned this side outward. As you can see, doesn't matter much what the inside of the frame looks like.

2. If you do it, use both glue and deck screws, pre-drill the deck screw holes. This will get you the ridgidity you desire.

3. Hardwoods are outrageously expensive at home depot, so take the time to locate a hardwoods vendor in your area if you can.

4. Make sure and put a back on. This is what provides side to side ridigidity.

5. Place the verticals so they are between the base and the top, as this puts the wood supporting your press, not the screws. See second pic.

6. I've had this setup about 6 years. Hasn't failed me yet and shows no signs of wearing out or getting loose.

7. You can also make this out of 3/4" birch plywood like you get from the woodworking stores to do wood shop cabinet projects. Avoid the Home Depot birch plywood. It's not nearly as good a stuff generally, though some guys can get good birch plywood at their home depots, usually up North, not here in the Atlanta area for sure.

bobhead
December 25, 2006, 02:02 AM
Well, here's what I came up with. The legs are steel (1" angle and square, brazed together). The top is from a scrap piece of oak butcher block. I ran 1/2" threaded rod through the press to the bench top.

Merry Christmas to all.

Idano
December 25, 2006, 03:20 AM
Bob:

It looks good, I like the design. Being an armature welder with a large stock pile of scrap metal I would probably fashion my strong mount similar to your when we move. If I didn't weld and/or have access to the metal I would definitely use Dave's design.

DaveInFloweryBranchGA
December 25, 2006, 08:18 AM
Bob,

Looks like a great solution to me. The main point I think folks hopefully will pick up is that you can quite easily fabricate solutions to such issues as press height without buying anything simply by using scrap you already have on hand. Wether it be wood or metal. This saves a bit of money and in today's world where many folks don't work with their hands, can be very satisfying.

I think you've done a nice job of blending metal and wood. Did you paint it black? or is that just the color of the steel? If you didn't, I would certainly suggest doing so as well as putting some wipe on poly or tung oil on the wood.

Regardless, it looks sharp and appears to have the capacity for expansion/adaptability. Great job.

Regards,

Dave

bobhead
December 25, 2006, 12:10 PM
Dave,

Yes, I painted the metal with black textured finish Krylon spray and the wood will get a tung oil finish. Those threaded rods compress the whole unit onto the bench top and give it a very stable feel. The bottom of the rods bolt through another piece of angle iron under the bench top to spread the load. The top of my bench is 3/4" plywood so I still get a tiny bit of flex from that but none from the mount itself. We'll see if the flex is a problem with I add that tall case feeder next week.

Bob(inAuburnAL)

DaveInFloweryBranchGA
December 25, 2006, 01:52 PM
Bob,

Sounds like you've done a heckuva job. Bet it looks great in person. On the flexing top: Based on previous personal experience, you can probably add a second 3/4' plywood sheet on top or a couple sheets of particle board underneath with perhaps a couple extra crossbar 2 X 4's and solve that flex problem.

I spent a year or so at Ft. Rucker Alabama when I was in the service. Really enjoyed the Auburn vs. Alabam rivalry. Even picked a team: Go Tigers!

Grin,

Dave

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