Is it safe?


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Tearlachblair
December 27, 2006, 04:15 AM
Is it safe to dry-fire the old .38 spl Colt police revolvers?

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Jim March
December 27, 2006, 05:10 AM
Probably not. If there's a hammer-mounted firing pin, definately not.

lawson
December 27, 2006, 06:22 AM
most older revolvers should not be dry fired. as mentioned above, firing pin damage can result if it's done too much.

spend $5 on some snap caps, it'll be worth it in the long run.

brett30030
December 27, 2006, 05:03 PM
spend $5 on some snap caps, it'll be worth it in the long run

Where can you buy a set of snap caps for $5?

Vern Humphrey
December 27, 2006, 05:14 PM
Where can you buy a set of snap caps for $5?

You can buy hundreds for $5. Take those old, split cases you were going to crush and throw out, and decap them. Fill the primer pockets with epoxy or Gorilla Glue and let it sit. Renew as needed.

lawson
December 27, 2006, 05:14 PM
last time i bought snap caps, they cost me $5 for a set of .38 special. it was four or five years ago, forgive me if they've gone up in price since then.

Jim March
December 27, 2006, 08:28 PM
I find that whenever you have to ask whether or not something is safe, it's a pretty good bet it ain't.

:)

GrantCunningham
December 28, 2006, 02:10 AM
Dry firing a Colt with a hammer-mounted firing pin is much like putting a standard scope on an air rifle - the forces involved are opposite of what the scope is designed to take, and the same is true for the firing pin.

The Colt firing pins float inside the hammer, and are normally forced backward when the primer is struck. When dry firing, though, there is nothing to restrain the firing pin; when the hammer hits the restraining shoulder inside the frame, the firing pin is thrown forward - the opposite of its normal movement - and is stopped only by the rivet that secures it in the hammer.

Over time, this leads to fractures around the rivet hole that serves as the pivot point for the firing pin.

Replacing the firing pin is a pain-in-the-you-know-what, as the rivet needs to be located (you'll notice that it isn't obvious), punched out of the hammer, then a new rivet fitted, peened into the hammer's hole, then ground into the recess around the hole, finished flush with the hammer surface, and - finally - the hammer has to be refinished to hide the rivet.

As a result, I recommend strongly that Colts not be dry fired without snap caps.

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