Stephen Hunter book to film/Multiple thread merged


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dk-corriveau
March 3, 2006, 01:23 PM
Stephen Hunter, author of Point of Impact (POI), is a contributor to the Tony Kornheiser radio show. On todayís show Stephen confirmed that POI is being made into a movie staring Mark Walberg. :what: :D

It goes into production in June with a fall release planned. Although he has the script, he has not had a chance to read it. One change he knows about is that they are not including the Memphis character. Instead they are combining some of his story into Swagger. Hunter also mentioned that he is disappointed that they didnít cast a Southern actor into the Swagger role. It will be interesting to see how this works.

I am sure that I speak for many of us when I say, I can't wait! :D

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HankB
March 3, 2006, 01:27 PM
Sounds good . . . but then I remember what "they" did to The Sum of All Fears . . . :barf:

Dave Markowitz
March 3, 2006, 01:39 PM
Marky Mark? :barf: Antigun twit.

Too bad, that's a great book.

MikeK
March 3, 2006, 02:23 PM
That was my favorite book by Hunter - I hope they don't screw up the movie.

Citadel99
March 3, 2006, 02:30 PM
If it's half as good as the book it'll be a good movie. Hope they don't mess it up...

Mark

ReadyontheRight
March 3, 2006, 02:44 PM
I always pictured Clint Eastwood when reading those books. Too old for the part though. Chris Cooper has that Arkansas shooter look to him.

Ed Harris?
Gary Sinise?

Are there any actors out there that actually look like Carlos Hathcock?

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/16/CarlosHathcock_color.jpg

TonkinTwentyMil
March 3, 2006, 05:14 PM
I was privileged to meet author Stephen Hunter some years ago. I asked him why none of his fine novels hadn't been adapted to film.

His reply indicated he was very frustrated with the Hollywood "process" and had little hope that his stuff would ever make it to the big screen. I do know that he's had some works optioned by Hollywood, then later canceled.

Given Brokeback Hollywood's current left-wing activist (more than ever before) tilt, I can't see them doing justice to Hunter's work. At the very least, it will likely be watered-down for political correctness and feminized to broaden appeal to 15-25 year-old girls and hostile-to-warriors urban metrosexuals... just like "Pearl Harbor." That relatively short production timeline also indicates it's being done on a restrictive budget.

While eliminating some characters and streamlining a 500-page novel's plot lines to get the whole thing adapted to (squeezed into!) a 120-page script is commonplace (screenwriting rule of thumb: 1 page of script = 1 minute of film-time; hence, 120 pages = 2 hour movie), the early signs here are not encouraging.

The REAL problem here is that Hunter's heroes ("Bob The Nailer," etc.) are all unreconstructed/politically incorrect/non-appeasing/violence-prone "angry white males" who use their fists -- and guns -- to vanquish crooks, crooked cops, and corrupt politicians. As I've discovered with my own scripts, that is just too close to making a good case for the Second Amendment for Hollywood tastes... where "Neanderthal" characters are inevitably required to see-the-light and "arc" into wiser/more sensitive/kinder-gentler/feel-your-pain Alan Alda types in the end (see the Bruce Willis character in "Die Hard").

The town of West Hollywood (home to a chunk of the industry) actually "banned" ALL semi-automatic weapons a few years ago. They later rescinded the ordinance when, to their embarrassment, they discovered they'd also "banned" the L.A. County Sheriff's Dept. (armed w/Beretta 9mm semi-auto pistols) who protected them. Such is the mindset of the "entertainment wing" of a certain political party" -- the folks who brought us "socially-relevant" stuff like "Runaway Jury," "Bowling For Columbine," and TV's "The West Wing."

Tolerance and Diversity are wonderful concepts. It's a shame they don't apply to Hollywood's politics. That's a huge reason why they pump out such cinematic sludge AND why box office revenues are in a serious nosedive.

Accordingly, I have little hope that Hunter's fine novel will be turned into a decent movie. To expect otherwise would be tantamount to expecting Michael Moore to appear in ads for the NRA and for Hillary Clinton to miraculously acquire real firearms literacy and oppose re-issuance of the old Assault Weapons ban (For the Children).

Fat chance.
----------------------

" If someone is going to start using their weapons (just) to protect their rights... it makes me very nervous..."
-- Congressman Henry Waxman, D-CA (W. Hollywood/Beverly Hills/Santa Monica)

"There's the perception that the entertainment community is to the left of the country..."
-- Dan Glickman, president, Motion Picture Arts Assoc., 3/25/05

gunsmith
March 3, 2006, 05:37 PM
Mark Walberg???? when I saw the title of the thread I was at first very happy, I loved the book!
But marky mark has opened his dumb mouth one to many times, he is a fool and a dirt bag and I can't watch any movie with him in it. I can not enjoy any movie with him in it because of his rad/lib diatribes off screen.
And couldn't they find some one who doesn't have a violent felony in his background and is allowed to possess a firearm?
I wish actors had to obey the law!

MS .45
March 3, 2006, 05:38 PM
I love Hunter's books and have read every one of them(I think). Mark Walberg as Swagger? Not exactly as I pictured him when reading the books.

chickenfried
March 3, 2006, 05:57 PM
I just hope John Milius is involved :) .

Dave R
March 3, 2006, 06:07 PM
Best news I've heard all day.

Hoping they don't mess it up.

gunsmith
March 3, 2006, 06:20 PM
marky mark is an anti gun jerk and a viscous criminal who shouldn't be anywhere near a firearm...

http://keepandbeararms.com/information/XcIBViewItem.asp?ID=2360

PLANET OF THE APE

Anti-Gun Eye-Gouger Marky Mark Helps Disarm Humans
--So Apes Can "Rule the Planet"

by David Codrea
GunTruths.com Co-Founder
KeepAndBearArms.com Featured Writer
CitizensOfAmerica.org Director
codrea4@home.com
©2001 by KeepAndBearArms.com

Part One: The Lautenberg Blues

Judy and Tom, of Fairfax, VA, got into an argument. Judy tore Tom's pocket, and he called the police. It was a move he now regrets, but he was upset, and wanted "documentation in a custody dispute."

Tom didn't want to press charges, but the police told him it was out of their hands. In the old days, they would have assessed the situation, and, if their experience and professionalism told them there was no danger, taken a report, instructed the parties to cool it, and moved on to protect the public from real crime.

But these are not the old days. These are the days of the Lautenberg amendment, and the cops had no choice under Commonwealth law but to press the charges Tom would not. Now, if convicted, or if she pleads guilty to a misdemeanor, Judy will never be able to touch a gun again. And until (and unless) she is exonerated or the charges are dropped, the prohibition stands.

Judy's Constitutionally protected right to keep and bear arms is now forfeit. Judy no longer has a legally recognized right to the means to protect herself. If Judy encounters an attacker, a rapist, a murderer, too bad; the law says she can't have a gun. After all, Judy tore Tom's pocket. Welcome to the new days.

Lora, 21, got in an argument with her mom. She flung some keys and an empty water bottle that HIT THE GROUND. Lora was arrested and booked. The reaction of her parents was described as one of "shock and horror."

Kathi, 32, swatted her child in discipline. It matters not that the judge refused to sentence her for this minor incident. Let us all hope Kathy makes 33, 34 and so on, because she has now been disarmed, receiving a "life sentence" under Lautenberg.

Ostensibly enacted as a measure to combat "domestic violence," the Lautenberg gun ban established a "zero tolerance" policy, and one that not only affects those convicted since its passage, but an ex-post facto monstrosity that reaches back in time and snares those convicted in the past. What this means is, someone involved in a dispute decades ago, who pled to a misdemeanor charge simply to get an expensive and protracted legal fight over and done with, now finds himself classified a prohibited person, a Second Amendment pariah, state-mandated prey. Forever. For something as simple as tearing a pocket. Or flinging keys to the ground. Or spanking a child.

And (surprise!), many of these prohibited persons are police and military personnel. They, like their private citizen counterparts under Lautenberg, can't touch a gun for the rest of their lives, not privately, nor in the course of their employment, even if there have been no further incidents, or if they have since had exemplary, even heroic careers. They are now forever barred, officially stripped of their basic human right to self preservation by the very system they devoted their lives to serving. They have been removed as crime deterrent assets, reducing our society's capability to guard against lawlessness. Significantly, as it illustrates the counterproductive and damaging results of most gun control laws, this has diminished the public's ability, both to be protected, and to protect itself, from violent criminals.

Violent criminals like anti-gun Planet of the Apes star Mark Wahlberg.

Part Two: Missing the Mark

"I believe Charlton Heston is America's best villain because he loves guns so much," Wahlberg snottily proclaimed at the MTV Movie Awards. "Maybe he should get the award for being president of the National Rifle Association."

Upon meeting Heston on the set of Apes, Wahlberg rudely told him that it was "very disturbing meeting you."

I can see why. The last person a violent criminal wants to meet is someone who understands that people have a right to bear arms, and that Mr. Wahlberg is a disturbed young man is evident. Still, if anyone should have been wary, it was Heston, who instead graciously offered his respects.

Because "respected actor" Wahlberg, formerly Calvin Klein underpants model and rapper Marky Mark, formerly a Dorchester, MA street thug, has an ugly and scary past. And if anyone's behavior illustrates why people need effective tools for self defense, this guy is quite an example.

Dropping out of school in the ninth grade, young Marky settled into a street life of petty crimes, stealing cars and selling drugs, whacked out on angel dust and with "a serious cocaine problem" by 14.

He "shoplifted habitually, now recalling how he used to try on sneakers he fancied then run out of the shop, without troubling the cashiers."

He was arrested in June of 1986 at 15, after he and two companion thugs chased some black kids from their neighborhood, throwing rocks at them and yelling racist epithets, obscenities and death threats.

"Kill the n-----s! Kill the n-----s!" Marky and his brave band screeched maniacally. "We don't like black n-----s in the area, so get the f--- away," they warned, giving chase.

The next day, encountering their victims again, heroic leading man Marky and company repeated their performance and succeeded in hitting two girls with rocks.

The complaint filed by the state was a civil rights action enjoining "the defendants from interfering with these rights by threats, coercion and intimidation." The Final Judgment prohibited Marky and his hate crime cohorts from "assaulting, threatening, intimidating or harassing...persons or property...because of that person's race color or national origin..." and was signed by Marky and his mother.

OK, so he was just a kid. Kids sometimes do stupid and hateful things, and people grow, people change. Marky grew and changed so much in the following two years, that in April of 1988, he attacked a Vietnamese man with a stick in an attempt to steal two cases of beer, later admitting being on alcohol and PCP at the time.

"Vietnam f---ing sh--!" Marky snarled, savagely hitting his victim in the head with a stick, knocking him senseless to the ground. After begging a second Vietnamese man to let him hide from the police, Marky sucker-punched the man in the eye, causing him to fall to the ground. After being placed under arrest, Marky "made numerous unsolicited racial statements about 'gooks' and 'slant-eyed gooks.' "

The victim Marky assaulted with the stick lost one of his "slanted" eyes. Marky, who had violated the terms of his earlier judgment, pled guilty to two counts of criminal contempt, each count carrying "a maximum penalty of ten years in a house of correction or ten thousand dollars or both." The Commonwealth's Sentencing Memorandum supported "the recommendation that the Defendant be sentenced to two years at the Deer Island House of Corrections, ninety days committed, with the balance suspended for two years."

Marky served 45 days. And he takes great pains these days to attest to how the experience turned his life around.

But it must not have turned him around too much, because in 1992, a complaint was filed against him that, while at a tennis court, "the defendant, Mark Wahlberg, a.k.a. Marky Mark, without provocation or cause, viciously and repeatedly kicked the plaintiff...in the face and jaw."

And, according to the complaint, it wasn't even a fair fight, but was actually pretty damn cowardly. At the time of the attack, it states, Marky's partner in assault "was holding the plaintiff...down on the ground. The plaintiff...had done nothing to provoke or warrant the attack by Mark Wahlberg, a.k.a. Marky Mark."

Reports of additional hate-filled violent attacks include:

People Magazine cites a [1993] brawl that broke out after he allegedly called one of Madonna's friends "a homo."

From React.com: "Marky Mark" Wahlberg has faced the judge four times on assault charges. He served 45 days in jail for participating in two attacks against Vietnamese men in 1988. In 1990, he was arrested in Boston for assaulting a police officer. And in 1992 he was arrested twice for assault, once for fighting with a security guard and the second time for participating in an assault on a teen by Wahlberg's bodyguard.

Part Three: "A Thousand Spears"

"Never send a monkey to do a man's job," Marky's heroic Planet of the Apes character, Major Leo Davidson declares. Aside from the fact that a guy with Marky's criminal record could never get in the military, we can suspend our disbelief. After all, Hollywood is built around the stuff of dreams.

"Our history is filled with men who have done amazing things," Major Marky instructs. Perhaps, had he not dropped out of school, he would be aware of that history, and of those men who authored our freedom and codified our inalienable right to keep and bear arms.

"Who would invent such a horrible thing?" asks chimp human rights activist Ari, naturally horrified and disgusted, like all good liberals, by Major Marky's handgun. Earlier in the film, incidentally, in a delicious bit of irony, she stopped a group of rowdy young apes, who were screaming threats and specist epithets, from throwing rocks at humans.

"That thing was going to keep us alive," Major Marky chides. What can he know that escapes his real-life counterpart? And why, if he equates promoting guns with villainy, does he allow his image to be marketed to children ("ages 4 and up") in the form of Hasbro action figures holding ... a gun?

"This has the power of a thousand spears," reveals General Thade's father, showing him an ancient, rusted handgun. The dying ape is portrayed, of course, by Marky-designated "villain" and disturbance source, Charlton Heston. "Against this, our strength means nothing."

Some have criticized Heston's performance, accusing him of being used by a leftist filmmaker to further alienate the public from guns. I didn't see it that way; first, the guy is an actor, and he was clearly playing a hateful creature, and second, he was illustrating how guns can be used to defend human life and liberty against ... ummm ... apes with sticks. Sticks that could put someone's eye out, or worse. More delicious irony, and it sounds pretty reasonable, to boot.

It is even more ironic that elitist Hollywood, the community that foists politically correct left-wing politicians and their stupid hate crime and gun control laws on us, would select a convicted hate criminal to play the role of hero, and a committed anti-gunner to extol the protective benefits of firearms in protecting human beings against violent apes.

Part Four: A Perfect Storm?

If you can believe People Magazine (and why wouldn't we?), Marky is a changed man. He regularly goes to Mass. He loves his mother. He donates to causes supporting underprivileged inner city kids. Has he really mellowed?

"I don't mind that much if people call me Marky Mark," he now says, so he must have. But I wonder if he'd mind people calling him "Maimy Maim"? Or "Gougey Gouge"?

But maybe it's true, and I'm being unfair. We are, all of us, sinners, all in need of forgiveness and redemption, and all capable of penitence and reformation. And we are, none of us, capable of perfection. When he tells us "I've done my share of bad," he is being truthful. So who am I to judge? Perhaps I should apologize?

Well, maybe I would, except for that dang gun thing Mr. Wahlberg chose to make an issue out of. It's not so much that he dissed Heston and the NRA, but because, by speaking out against legitimate firearm ownership in a forum as subversive as the MTV Awards, he has attacked all of us. He has contributed to a climate that encourages public contempt for guns and ridicule of gun owners, and this emboldens treasonous legislators to propose and enact further infringements on our rights. He has made it harder for human beings to defend themselves against the animals among us, the rowdy rock throwers, the attackers, the gougers, the apes.

Privileged people like the "plucky" Mr. Wahlberg have enabled abominations against individual human rights like ... the Lautenberg amendment. Remember Judy? And Lora? And Kathi? Wait a minute ... if they could be disarmed for life, for tearing pockets, throwing keys on the ground, and spanking children, if they cannot even TOUCH a gun, loaded or not, without committing a federal offense, how is it that Pokey Poke gets away with handling real guns, provided by federally licensed (including Class III) armorers, in movies like Three Kings and The Big Hit and The Corrupter? That the weapons were loaded with blanks is not the point; prohibited persons may not even touch a gun. And if a convicted cop can never be employed with a gun, why would an actor enjoy immunity in his employment?

Ahh, but there's the rub; Lautenberg applies to domestic violence. The "pokey" Mr. Wahlberg was only guilty of a ... a felony? Hold the phone!

Title I of the Gun Control Act of 1968 prohibits certain classes of persons from "purchasing, receiving or transporting firearms or ammunition in interstate commerce." Among these are persons "convicted of or under indictment for a felony ... Such persons correspondingly are prohibited from purchasing or otherwise acquiring any firearm or ammunition which has been shipped in interstate commerce."

One can hardly argue that moviemaking is not interstate commerce. And Marky's troubled past appears problematic in this regard.

Also problematic for the studios employing him may be 18 USC Chapter 44, Sec. 922, "Unlawful Acts", which states:

"It shall be unlawful for any person to sell or otherwise dispose of any firearm or ammunition to any person knowing or having reasonable cause to believe that such person - (1) is under indictment for, or has been convicted in any court of, a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year;"

Remember Marky's sentence? "Two years, 90 days committed, with the balance suspended for two years?" And Marky himself reportedly admitted in an interview for his porno film, Boogie Nights,

"This was Deer Island, in Massachusetts. I was there for about fifty days, but I'd been sentenced for about four years, with six months to serve."

So I approached the Suffolk County Clerk's Office for Criminal Business, the office for the court of jurisdiction in Marky's conviction, with three questions:

Has Mr. Wahlberg's record been expunged?

The answer was "No, it is public record."

Was defendant Wahlberg sentenced as a juvenile or as an adult?

"He was tried as an adult."

Was defendant Wahlberg convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor?

The representative explained to me how the "whole proceeding sounds so strange ... the judge had a penchant for doing strange things." He told me that normal procedures were not followed, and said that he had been involved in the case, but could not remember the details. He could not understand the reason behind the attorney general selecting those particular charges in light of the circumstances of the case, and speculated on the climate of the time, how the area was still adjusting to the issue of bussing, how Marky was pretty typical of kids coming from the area known as "Savage Hill," and how he met him once and he seemed "nice." He assured me that he was not trying to evade my question, but that, without a cite, his answer had to be "I don't know." He then referred me to someone who might, Marky's attorney of record, Francis W. Quinn.

Mr. Quinn informed me that "without acknowledging that [he] was Mr. Wahlberg's attorney," he could not speak to me about the matter unless I had "a written release from Mr. Wahlberg authorizing [him] to do so."

If anti-gun Mr. Wahlberg is a federal gun felon, he has left a trail of evidence that clearly shows him violating federal proscriptions on numerous occasions. If so, it would seem that anti-gun Hollywood producers and directors may have compounded and abetted felonious acts by procuring and providing weapons to a prohibited person. If this is so, charges could be filed against all parties, federal firearms licenses lost, fines levied, and prison sentences imposed, just as would happen if the violator was Judy, or Lora, or Kathi, or a person who knowingly provided them with guns.

Have the anti-gun Mr. Wahlberg and his anti-gun employers created a perfect storm, one that has now caught them up in its path?

A chronology of Marky's films follows. Perhaps some of them will one day serve as courtroom exhibits. Perhaps on that day, he will wish that this country didn't have so many gun control laws. Perhaps he will then realize that, when deprived of the means to protect life and liberty, human beings become either subjects or prey for those who would "rule the planet."

People's Exhibit A:?

2001: Rock Star
2001: Planet of the Apes
2000: The Perfect Storm
2000: The Yards
1999: Three Kings
1999: The Corruptor
1999: The Yards
1998: The Big Hit
1997: Boogie Nights
1997: Traveller
1996: Fear
1995: The Basketball Diaries
1994: Renaissance Man

gunsmith
March 3, 2006, 06:29 PM
Mark wahlberg is slated to be the star of this movie, which was a great gunnie book! we should tell hollywood NO WAY!
marky mark is an anti gun jerk and a viscous criminal who shouldn't be anywhere near a firearm...

http://keepandbeararms.com/informati...em.asp?ID=2360

PLANET OF THE APE

Anti-Gun Eye-Gouger Marky Mark Helps Disarm Humans
--So Apes Can "Rule the Planet"

by David Codrea
GunTruths.com Co-Founder
KeepAndBearArms.com Featured Writer
CitizensOfAmerica.org Director
codrea4@home.com
©2001 by KeepAndBearArms.com

Part One: The Lautenberg Blues

Judy and Tom, of Fairfax, VA, got into an argument. Judy tore Tom's pocket, and he called the police. It was a move he now regrets, but he was upset, and wanted "documentation in a custody dispute."

Tom didn't want to press charges, but the police told him it was out of their hands. In the old days, they would have assessed the situation, and, if their experience and professionalism told them there was no danger, taken a report, instructed the parties to cool it, and moved on to protect the public from real crime.

But these are not the old days. These are the days of the Lautenberg amendment, and the cops had no choice under Commonwealth law but to press the charges Tom would not. Now, if convicted, or if she pleads guilty to a misdemeanor, Judy will never be able to touch a gun again. And until (and unless) she is exonerated or the charges are dropped, the prohibition stands.

Judy's Constitutionally protected right to keep and bear arms is now forfeit. Judy no longer has a legally recognized right to the means to protect herself. If Judy encounters an attacker, a rapist, a murderer, too bad; the law says she can't have a gun. After all, Judy tore Tom's pocket. Welcome to the new days.

Lora, 21, got in an argument with her mom. She flung some keys and an empty water bottle that HIT THE GROUND. Lora was arrested and booked. The reaction of her parents was described as one of "shock and horror."

Kathi, 32, swatted her child in discipline. It matters not that the judge refused to sentence her for this minor incident. Let us all hope Kathy makes 33, 34 and so on, because she has now been disarmed, receiving a "life sentence" under Lautenberg.

Ostensibly enacted as a measure to combat "domestic violence," the Lautenberg gun ban established a "zero tolerance" policy, and one that not only affects those convicted since its passage, but an ex-post facto monstrosity that reaches back in time and snares those convicted in the past. What this means is, someone involved in a dispute decades ago, who pled to a misdemeanor charge simply to get an expensive and protracted legal fight over and done with, now finds himself classified a prohibited person, a Second Amendment pariah, state-mandated prey. Forever. For something as simple as tearing a pocket. Or flinging keys to the ground. Or spanking a child.

And (surprise!), many of these prohibited persons are police and military personnel. They, like their private citizen counterparts under Lautenberg, can't touch a gun for the rest of their lives, not privately, nor in the course of their employment, even if there have been no further incidents, or if they have since had exemplary, even heroic careers. They are now forever barred, officially stripped of their basic human right to self preservation by the very system they devoted their lives to serving. They have been removed as crime deterrent assets, reducing our society's capability to guard against lawlessness. Significantly, as it illustrates the counterproductive and damaging results of most gun control laws, this has diminished the public's ability, both to be protected, and to protect itself, from violent criminals.

Violent criminals like anti-gun Planet of the Apes star Mark Wahlberg.

Part Two: Missing the Mark

"I believe Charlton Heston is America's best villain because he loves guns so much," Wahlberg snottily proclaimed at the MTV Movie Awards. "Maybe he should get the award for being president of the National Rifle Association."

Upon meeting Heston on the set of Apes, Wahlberg rudely told him that it was "very disturbing meeting you."

I can see why. The last person a violent criminal wants to meet is someone who understands that people have a right to bear arms, and that Mr. Wahlberg is a disturbed young man is evident. Still, if anyone should have been wary, it was Heston, who instead graciously offered his respects.

Because "respected actor" Wahlberg, formerly Calvin Klein underpants model and rapper Marky Mark, formerly a Dorchester, MA street thug, has an ugly and scary past. And if anyone's behavior illustrates why people need effective tools for self defense, this guy is quite an example.

Dropping out of school in the ninth grade, young Marky settled into a street life of petty crimes, stealing cars and selling drugs, whacked out on angel dust and with "a serious cocaine problem" by 14.

He "shoplifted habitually, now recalling how he used to try on sneakers he fancied then run out of the shop, without troubling the cashiers."

He was arrested in June of 1986 at 15, after he and two companion thugs chased some black kids from their neighborhood, throwing rocks at them and yelling racist epithets, obscenities and death threats.

"Kill the n-----s! Kill the n-----s!" Marky and his brave band screeched maniacally. "We don't like black n-----s in the area, so get the f--- away," they warned, giving chase.

The next day, encountering their victims again, heroic leading man Marky and company repeated their performance and succeeded in hitting two girls with rocks.

The complaint filed by the state was a civil rights action enjoining "the defendants from interfering with these rights by threats, coercion and intimidation." The Final Judgment prohibited Marky and his hate crime cohorts from "assaulting, threatening, intimidating or harassing...persons or property...because of that person's race color or national origin..." and was signed by Marky and his mother.

OK, so he was just a kid. Kids sometimes do stupid and hateful things, and people grow, people change. Marky grew and changed so much in the following two years, that in April of 1988, he attacked a Vietnamese man with a stick in an attempt to steal two cases of beer, later admitting being on alcohol and PCP at the time.

"Vietnam f---ing sh--!" Marky snarled, savagely hitting his victim in the head with a stick, knocking him senseless to the ground. After begging a second Vietnamese man to let him hide from the police, Marky sucker-punched the man in the eye, causing him to fall to the ground. After being placed under arrest, Marky "made numerous unsolicited racial statements about 'gooks' and 'slant-eyed gooks.' "

The victim Marky assaulted with the stick lost one of his "slanted" eyes. Marky, who had violated the terms of his earlier judgment, pled guilty to two counts of criminal contempt, each count carrying "a maximum penalty of ten years in a house of correction or ten thousand dollars or both." The Commonwealth's Sentencing Memorandum supported "the recommendation that the Defendant be sentenced to two years at the Deer Island House of Corrections, ninety days committed, with the balance suspended for two years."

Marky served 45 days. And he takes great pains these days to attest to how the experience turned his life around.

But it must not have turned him around too much, because in 1992, a complaint was filed against him that, while at a tennis court, "the defendant, Mark Wahlberg, a.k.a. Marky Mark, without provocation or cause, viciously and repeatedly kicked the plaintiff...in the face and jaw."

And, according to the complaint, it wasn't even a fair fight, but was actually pretty damn cowardly. At the time of the attack, it states, Marky's partner in assault "was holding the plaintiff...down on the ground. The plaintiff...had done nothing to provoke or warrant the attack by Mark Wahlberg, a.k.a. Marky Mark."

Reports of additional hate-filled violent attacks include:

People Magazine cites a [1993] brawl that broke out after he allegedly called one of Madonna's friends "a homo."

From React.com: "Marky Mark" Wahlberg has faced the judge four times on assault charges. He served 45 days in jail for participating in two attacks against Vietnamese men in 1988. In 1990, he was arrested in Boston for assaulting a police officer. And in 1992 he was arrested twice for assault, once for fighting with a security guard and the second time for participating in an assault on a teen by Wahlberg's bodyguard.

Part Three: "A Thousand Spears"

"Never send a monkey to do a man's job," Marky's heroic Planet of the Apes character, Major Leo Davidson declares. Aside from the fact that a guy with Marky's criminal record could never get in the military, we can suspend our disbelief. After all, Hollywood is built around the stuff of dreams.

"Our history is filled with men who have done amazing things," Major Marky instructs. Perhaps, had he not dropped out of school, he would be aware of that history, and of those men who authored our freedom and codified our inalienable right to keep and bear arms.

"Who would invent such a horrible thing?" asks chimp human rights activist Ari, naturally horrified and disgusted, like all good liberals, by Major Marky's handgun. Earlier in the film, incidentally, in a delicious bit of irony, she stopped a group of rowdy young apes, who were screaming threats and specist epithets, from throwing rocks at humans.

"That thing was going to keep us alive," Major Marky chides. What can he know that escapes his real-life counterpart? And why, if he equates promoting guns with villainy, does he allow his image to be marketed to children ("ages 4 and up") in the form of Hasbro action figures holding ... a gun?

"This has the power of a thousand spears," reveals General Thade's father, showing him an ancient, rusted handgun. The dying ape is portrayed, of course, by Marky-designated "villain" and disturbance source, Charlton Heston. "Against this, our strength means nothing."

Some have criticized Heston's performance, accusing him of being used by a leftist filmmaker to further alienate the public from guns. I didn't see it that way; first, the guy is an actor, and he was clearly playing a hateful creature, and second, he was illustrating how guns can be used to defend human life and liberty against ... ummm ... apes with sticks. Sticks that could put someone's eye out, or worse. More delicious irony, and it sounds pretty reasonable, to boot.

It is even more ironic that elitist Hollywood, the community that foists politically correct left-wing politicians and their stupid hate crime and gun control laws on us, would select a convicted hate criminal to play the role of hero, and a committed anti-gunner to extol the protective benefits of firearms in protecting human beings against violent apes.

Part Four: A Perfect Storm?

If you can believe People Magazine (and why wouldn't we?), Marky is a changed man. He regularly goes to Mass. He loves his mother. He donates to causes supporting underprivileged inner city kids. Has he really mellowed?

"I don't mind that much if people call me Marky Mark," he now says, so he must have. But I wonder if he'd mind people calling him "Maimy Maim"? Or "Gougey Gouge"?

But maybe it's true, and I'm being unfair. We are, all of us, sinners, all in need of forgiveness and redemption, and all capable of penitence and reformation. And we are, none of us, capable of perfection. When he tells us "I've done my share of bad," he is being truthful. So who am I to judge? Perhaps I should apologize?

Well, maybe I would, except for that dang gun thing Mr. Wahlberg chose to make an issue out of. It's not so much that he dissed Heston and the NRA, but because, by speaking out against legitimate firearm ownership in a forum as subversive as the MTV Awards, he has attacked all of us. He has contributed to a climate that encourages public contempt for guns and ridicule of gun owners, and this emboldens treasonous legislators to propose and enact further infringements on our rights. He has made it harder for human beings to defend themselves against the animals among us, the rowdy rock throwers, the attackers, the gougers, the apes.

Privileged people like the "plucky" Mr. Wahlberg have enabled abominations against individual human rights like ... the Lautenberg amendment. Remember Judy? And Lora? And Kathi? Wait a minute ... if they could be disarmed for life, for tearing pockets, throwing keys on the ground, and spanking children, if they cannot even TOUCH a gun, loaded or not, without committing a federal offense, how is it that Pokey Poke gets away with handling real guns, provided by federally licensed (including Class III) armorers, in movies like Three Kings and The Big Hit and The Corrupter? That the weapons were loaded with blanks is not the point; prohibited persons may not even touch a gun. And if a convicted cop can never be employed with a gun, why would an actor enjoy immunity in his employment?

Ahh, but there's the rub; Lautenberg applies to domestic violence. The "pokey" Mr. Wahlberg was only guilty of a ... a felony? Hold the phone!

Title I of the Gun Control Act of 1968 prohibits certain classes of persons from "purchasing, receiving or transporting firearms or ammunition in interstate commerce." Among these are persons "convicted of or under indictment for a felony ... Such persons correspondingly are prohibited from purchasing or otherwise acquiring any firearm or ammunition which has been shipped in interstate commerce."

One can hardly argue that moviemaking is not interstate commerce. And Marky's troubled past appears problematic in this regard.

Also problematic for the studios employing him may be 18 USC Chapter 44, Sec. 922, "Unlawful Acts", which states:

"It shall be unlawful for any person to sell or otherwise dispose of any firearm or ammunition to any person knowing or having reasonable cause to believe that such person - (1) is under indictment for, or has been convicted in any court of, a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year;"

Remember Marky's sentence? "Two years, 90 days committed, with the balance suspended for two years?" And Marky himself reportedly admitted in an interview for his porno film, Boogie Nights,

"This was Deer Island, in Massachusetts. I was there for about fifty days, but I'd been sentenced for about four years, with six months to serve."

So I approached the Suffolk County Clerk's Office for Criminal Business, the office for the court of jurisdiction in Marky's conviction, with three questions:

Has Mr. Wahlberg's record been expunged?

The answer was "No, it is public record."

Was defendant Wahlberg sentenced as a juvenile or as an adult?

"He was tried as an adult."

Was defendant Wahlberg convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor?

The representative explained to me how the "whole proceeding sounds so strange ... the judge had a penchant for doing strange things." He told me that normal procedures were not followed, and said that he had been involved in the case, but could not remember the details. He could not understand the reason behind the attorney general selecting those particular charges in light of the circumstances of the case, and speculated on the climate of the time, how the area was still adjusting to the issue of bussing, how Marky was pretty typical of kids coming from the area known as "Savage Hill," and how he met him once and he seemed "nice." He assured me that he was not trying to evade my question, but that, without a cite, his answer had to be "I don't know." He then referred me to someone who might, Marky's attorney of record, Francis W. Quinn.

Mr. Quinn informed me that "without acknowledging that [he] was Mr. Wahlberg's attorney," he could not speak to me about the matter unless I had "a written release from Mr. Wahlberg authorizing [him] to do so."

If anti-gun Mr. Wahlberg is a federal gun felon, he has left a trail of evidence that clearly shows him violating federal proscriptions on numerous occasions. If so, it would seem that anti-gun Hollywood producers and directors may have compounded and abetted felonious acts by procuring and providing weapons to a prohibited person. If this is so, charges could be filed against all parties, federal firearms licenses lost, fines levied, and prison sentences imposed, just as would happen if the violator was Judy, or Lora, or Kathi, or a person who knowingly provided them with guns.

Have the anti-gun Mr. Wahlberg and his anti-gun employers created a perfect storm, one that has now caught them up in its path?

A chronology of Marky's films follows. Perhaps some of them will one day serve as courtroom exhibits. Perhaps on that day, he will wish that this country didn't have so many gun control laws. Perhaps he will then realize that, when deprived of the means to protect life and liberty, human beings become either subjects or prey for those who would "rule the planet."

People's Exhibit A:?

2001: Rock Star
2001: Planet of the Apes
2000: The Perfect Storm
2000: The Yards
1999: Three Kings
1999: The Corruptor
1999: The Yards
1998: The Big Hit
1997: Boogie Nights
1997: Traveller
1996: Fear
1995: The Basketball Diaries
1994: Renaissance Man

Cowgunner
March 3, 2006, 08:39 PM
Good God Almighty.................They couldn't get Sam Elliot to be Bob Swagger?

ReadyontheRight
March 3, 2006, 09:22 PM
Sam Elliot -- Perfect!

On a related note -- Maybe they will make "Dirty White Boys" into a movie. It would probably win an Oscar if they include the prison scenes.:uhoh:

Dave R
March 3, 2006, 09:52 PM
Good God Almighty.................They couldn't get Sam Elliot to be Bob Swagger?There's your Bob Lee Swagger, all right. Fire that Walberg wannabe and get the right man.

bill2
March 3, 2006, 10:20 PM
Nah, if you want the a great actor for the part - get Liam Niesson (spelling?). He would be perfect - he also did a southern part in some movie with Patrick Swazy. but Marky Mark? give me a break! Hollywood shouldn't be allowed to wreck such a great book.

Stevie-Ray
March 3, 2006, 10:34 PM
Don't know if they could get Elliot to look young enough. Last I saw of him he was beginning to look his age. He'd be perfect back in his old western days. (The Quick and the Dead, The Sacketts, Wild Times, etc.)

Yeah, Liam Neeson would also be good. His portrayal of Briar in Next of Kin was quite good.

Rick O'Shea
March 10, 2006, 08:33 AM
After seeing "The Unit" the other night (not bad, by the way, and very "gunny"), I think the perfect Bob Lee Swagger might be Robert Patrick.
(Halfway through the book now...)

hillbilly
March 10, 2006, 09:31 AM
I'll believe the movie exists when I actually see it.

Back in 1997 or so, I was in Gillette, Wyoming, and had the privilege of doing some work out at D&L Sports, home of Dave Lauck and the Tactical Marksman's Match.

And by "work" that's exactly what I mean....I helped Mr. Lauck build a barn and then was a range officer for parts of his shooting competition.

Back then, Mr. Lauck was telling me about the Hunter books, and how he had been contacted by Hunter as a consultant. Lauck is listed in the back of one of Hunter's novels as a technical consultant on long range shooting.

Anyway, as early as 1997, one of the Hunter novels was supposed to be turned into a movie, and Dave Lauck was disappointed in the apparent choice of actors to play Swagger.

I distinctly remember Lauck grinning at me, and saying, "Why would they pick a punk like Keaneau Reeves to play Bob the Nailer?"

Can you imagine, Keaneau "duuuuuuude" Reeves as Bob Lee Swagger?

The horror........the horror.............

hillbilly

jason10mm
March 10, 2006, 10:00 AM
Personally, I think Scott Glenn or Sam Elliott embody the book Swagger the best.

I assume they will update the character to a Desert Storm vet? Can't see them dropping the money to make it a period piece since it would likely make no difference to the final product. I can see Hollywood focusing on the assasination plot (probably altering it to the tired "evil white gov't after the kindly minority leader" plot) to the exclusion of developing Swagger at all. I suspect the anti-authority Swagger and the interesting firearms lore that make the book distinct will be diluted out in movie cliches.

But in the hands of the right director (sadly can't think of many still living who could do the film justice) it would still be good.

ebd10
March 10, 2006, 10:13 AM
But in the hands of the right director (sadly can't think of many still living who could do the film justice) it would still be good.

Are you kidding??? JOHN MILIUS!!!

Logan5
March 10, 2006, 01:23 PM
It's already hosed if they're combining Swagger and Memphis (the FBI agent, right?) If they do that, it's pretty much eliminating 60% of the plot right off the bat.

Correia
March 10, 2006, 02:06 PM
Rick, I agree. I also pictured Robert Patrick. And he is from Georgia.

fisherman66
March 10, 2006, 02:26 PM
Bob Lee should be Tom Hanks or Tommy Lee Jones
Memphis should be John Cusack (little doppy, right?)
Dr Sissy forget name......Tim Robins


Bad guy list....Gary Busey, Steve Buscemi, Harvey Keitel

Great Book, I doubt the movie will live up to the book.

Rick O'Shea
March 10, 2006, 02:37 PM
Really?
That makes two of us.
Scott Glenn wouldn't be bad; They just need someone with that lean, cold look to them. The stillness in the eyes.
A good enough actor to give him that and a proper Southern demeanor and a hard moral center.

Any chance anyone out there in charge of these decisions is reading all these fine ideas? :rolleyes:

Seriously, if they use Mark Wahlberg and take Nick Memphis' character out then they may as well change the name of the movie.
The author's credit can be "suggested by characters created by..."
If he even wants credit.

Aww, who am I kidding? I'm going to see it anyway... :banghead:

Silent-Snail
March 11, 2006, 10:36 AM
I have a sickening feeling that this is going to end up like Starship Troopers.

JBP
October 4, 2006, 05:45 PM
Stephen Hunter's "Point of Impact" is finally being made into a movie. I think Mark Wahlberg is too young for the part of Swagger so my guess is he will be a Gulf War or Iraqi/Afganistan vet.

http://www.baltimoresun.com/features/lifestyle/bal-to.movie04oct04,1,1034018,print.story?coll=bal-artslife-today

From the Baltimore Sun

Federal Hill has bit part in film based on Hunter book
Neighborhood disruption? Author says it's fine with him


By Chris Kaltenbach
Sun Reporter

October 4, 2006

The cameras will roll again in Baltimore, and this time the local connection isn't restricted to the set's location.

Movie crews are scheduled to be in Federal Hill filming scenes Friday for Shooter, a thriller starring Mark Wahlberg and slated for a March release.

Based on the novel Point of Impact, by former Sun movie critic Stephen Hunter, now a Pulitzer Prize-winning critic for The Washington Post, the film centers on an Army sniper who finds himself framed for a political assassination. Naturally, his only recourse is to find the real killer before the police find him.

While most of the film was shot in Vancouver, British Columbia, which doubled for Polk County, Ark., parts also are being shot in Philadelphia and Washington.

Hunter is scheduled to step in front of the camera during today's D.C. shoot, dressed as a cop and -- perhaps -- making it into a crowd scene. "I've been studying my motivation for months now," he deadpans. "Having seen 20,000 movies and knowing what's wrong with every one of them, I couldn't resist an opportunity like this."

Only one day of filming is scheduled here, says Hannah Lee Byron, head of the Division of Film, Television & Video for the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts. But this week's shoot comes on the heels of last week's filming of Live Free or Die Hard, the fourth installment of Bruce Willis' Die Hard franchise.

"It's not unusual," says Byron, who adds that playing host to multiple film crews has become almost de rigeur. "We've had two filmings simultaneously, in addition to [the HBO series] The Wire. We've handled it."

Although Shooter came with its own crew, the filmmakers hired some 200 local extras, she added, as well as a local caterer.

For Hunter, married to Sun columnist Jean Marbella, Shooter is a double-edged sword. On the upside, it's the first of his dozen books to be made into a feature film, and it's being directed by Antoine Fuqua, a personal favorite. ("One of the few Hollywood directors I haven't torn from limb to limb in prose," Hunter says).

The downside? They'll be in his neighborhood Friday, taking valuable parking spaces.

"I got to my car the other day, and there was a notification from a film crew that filming would be done on Friday, and I would be inconvenienced," Hunter says. "Having gotten stuck in traffic during Die Hard, ... I was filled with grumpy resentment. But when I realized what film it was, I granted it a dispensation."

chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com
Copyright © 2006, The Baltimore Sun | Get Sun home delivery

> Get news on your mobile device at www.baltimoresun.com

NastyNate
October 4, 2006, 06:19 PM
Hope they don't screw it up.

mljdeckard
October 4, 2006, 06:20 PM
It was listed before on IMDB, and then taken down. Obviously there is going to be a gutting of the book, any Marine Corps sniper who was in Vietnam is going to be a minumum of 54 years old, you're looking at Scott Glenn or Tommy Lee Jones. I'm going to guess they make him a veteran of one or both Iraq wars.

I dunno. The book has so much detail, and that's what made it great, but I don't know how much of it they will keep for the movie.

Antoine Fuqua is a great director, and I will trust him to do a good job, but this film is only going to be half the book.

http://imdb.com/title/tt0822854/

dk-corriveau
October 4, 2006, 07:32 PM
Even if it's half the book, if they do it half the justice it deserves it will be one hell of a movie. I am currently reading Dirty White Boys, my 7th book by Hunter. He is a very good writer with a nack for the dramatic. I only wish he would write a Western. With his knowledge of firearms and firearm history, it would be a killer!

About four months ago I heard an interview of Hunter on the Tony Kornheiser show. At that point, he suspected that the Nick Memphis character would be written out all together. But the IMBD listing shows that Nick is in, which I take as a good sign.

Bottom line, I will be leaving the wife and kids at home if I have to on opening day, regardless of the reviews. I can't wait.

mljdeckard
October 4, 2006, 08:45 PM
Oh, absolutely. It will be seen.

LkWinnipesaukee
October 4, 2006, 08:51 PM
I just finished the Swagger series. Now I must have all the guns in the books (I have a list:D )


Should be an absolutely sweet movie... if they dont screw it up


The cast doesnt look too good. Example- I thought Dennis Hopper reminded me of Jack Payne. And Wahlberg is WAY too young to play Swagger

dk-corriveau
October 4, 2006, 09:27 PM
-LK,

Can you post your list? I'll see if I can add to it from the other books. I would call it my Bob Lee collection. Anything to justify more guns. :)

LkWinnipesaukee
October 4, 2006, 09:58 PM
I probably missed some, but heres all the guns (and details) I caught in Point of Impact... I'll look through it and the others again when I have time. Really wish I had written down the list:rolleyes: :

-Remington 700V in .308. Leupold 10X Ultra scope, Fiberglass/kevlar stock, Hart Stainless barrel w/button cut rifling finished with Teflon, Ti firing pin, bedded in Devcon aluminum, pillar bedded screws. This was Bob Lee's 700.

-Pre '64 Winchester Model 70 in 300 H&H Magnum. Unertl 36x scope. Serial #100000

-Stainless Smith & Wesson Model 4506 in 10mm


I remember he had a 1911 of some sort, and in the other books he had other versions of the Remington 700. Then there were the 2 Russian guns (names escape me). And then in TIme to Hunt the Russian had a gun in 7mm Rem mag, but I forget what it was.

Like I said, I'll check the books out again. And if anyone has a Winchester 70, Serial number 100000, please tell me :p

steveracer
October 4, 2006, 10:21 PM
It's not hard to shoot that movie circa 1985. Then it would be easy to fit the time frame of vietnam vet in there. It isn't that many more millions of dollars to shoot a "period" piece that is only about 20 years ago. All you have to do that is "hard" is get all the newer cars off the street, and CG out the newer stuff you can't get rid of.
If they set it in 1985-89, it would work just fine.
I'm going either way. I like Hunter, even if he is a little off base when it comes to gun control.

Bruce H
October 4, 2006, 10:37 PM
Mark Wahlberg isn't fit to portray anything human.

dfaugh
October 5, 2006, 09:29 AM
Boy, I hope they don't screw this up.

Because at least half his books would make good movies, if done "right". I'm a bit surprised they chose "Point of Impact" (well, maybe not, its more "Hollywood") over a couple others ("Time to Kill").

I'm an avid reader, and rarely read the same book twice UNLESS I consider it really, really, REALLY good. I'm on my 3rd/4th reading of Hunters books.

mljdeckard
October 6, 2006, 01:38 AM
I agree, Point of Impact is one of VERY few books I have re-read in the last 20 years.

Give Antoine Fuqua a chance. He directed Tears of the Sun and Training Day too, and managed to keep them pretty good.

gunsmith
October 6, 2006, 05:01 AM
from a thread I posted in March!

http://www.thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=186701&highlight=wahlberg

I propose we boycott new movie, point of impact!
Mark wahlberg is slated to be the star of this movie, which was a great gunnie book! we should tell hollywood NO WAY!
marky mark is an anti gun jerk and a viscous criminal who shouldn't be anywhere near a firearm...

http://keepandbeararms.com/informati...em.asp?ID=2360

PLANET OF THE APE

Anti-Gun Eye-Gouger Marky Mark Helps Disarm Humans
--So Apes Can "Rule the Planet"

by David Codrea
GunTruths.com Co-Founder
KeepAndBearArms.com Featured Writer
CitizensOfAmerica.org Director
codrea4@home.com
©2001 by KeepAndBearArms.com

Part One: The Lautenberg Blues

Judy and Tom, of Fairfax, VA, got into an argument. Judy tore Tom's pocket, and he called the police. It was a move he now regrets, but he was upset, and wanted "documentation in a custody dispute."

Tom didn't want to press charges, but the police told him it was out of their hands. In the old days, they would have assessed the situation, and, if their experience and professionalism told them there was no danger, taken a report, instructed the parties to cool it, and moved on to protect the public from real crime.

But these are not the old days. These are the days of the Lautenberg amendment, and the cops had no choice under Commonwealth law but to press the charges Tom would not. Now, if convicted, or if she pleads guilty to a misdemeanor, Judy will never be able to touch a gun again. And until (and unless) she is exonerated or the charges are dropped, the prohibition stands.

Judy's Constitutionally protected right to keep and bear arms is now forfeit. Judy no longer has a legally recognized right to the means to protect herself. If Judy encounters an attacker, a rapist, a murderer, too bad; the law says she can't have a gun. After all, Judy tore Tom's pocket. Welcome to the new days.

Lora, 21, got in an argument with her mom. She flung some keys and an empty water bottle that HIT THE GROUND. Lora was arrested and booked. The reaction of her parents was described as one of "shock and horror."

Kathi, 32, swatted her child in discipline. It matters not that the judge refused to sentence her for this minor incident. Let us all hope Kathy makes 33, 34 and so on, because she has now been disarmed, receiving a "life sentence" under Lautenberg.

Ostensibly enacted as a measure to combat "domestic violence," the Lautenberg gun ban established a "zero tolerance" policy, and one that not only affects those convicted since its passage, but an ex-post facto monstrosity that reaches back in time and snares those convicted in the past. What this means is, someone involved in a dispute decades ago, who pled to a misdemeanor charge simply to get an expensive and protracted legal fight over and done with, now finds himself classified a prohibited person, a Second Amendment pariah, state-mandated prey. Forever. For something as simple as tearing a pocket. Or flinging keys to the ground. Or spanking a child.

And (surprise!), many of these prohibited persons are police and military personnel. They, like their private citizen counterparts under Lautenberg, can't touch a gun for the rest of their lives, not privately, nor in the course of their employment, even if there have been no further incidents, or if they have since had exemplary, even heroic careers. They are now forever barred, officially stripped of their basic human right to self preservation by the very system they devoted their lives to serving. They have been removed as crime deterrent assets, reducing our society's capability to guard against lawlessness. Significantly, as it illustrates the counterproductive and damaging results of most gun control laws, this has diminished the public's ability, both to be protected, and to protect itself, from violent criminals.

Violent criminals like anti-gun Planet of the Apes star Mark Wahlberg.

Part Two: Missing the Mark

"I believe Charlton Heston is America's best villain because he loves guns so much," Wahlberg snottily proclaimed at the MTV Movie Awards. "Maybe he should get the award for being president of the National Rifle Association."

Upon meeting Heston on the set of Apes, Wahlberg rudely told him that it was "very disturbing meeting you."

I can see why. The last person a violent criminal wants to meet is someone who understands that people have a right to bear arms, and that Mr. Wahlberg is a disturbed young man is evident. Still, if anyone should have been wary, it was Heston, who instead graciously offered his respects.

Because "respected actor" Wahlberg, formerly Calvin Klein underpants model and rapper Marky Mark, formerly a Dorchester, MA street thug, has an ugly and scary past. And if anyone's behavior illustrates why people need effective tools for self defense, this guy is quite an example.

Dropping out of school in the ninth grade, young Marky settled into a street life of petty crimes, stealing cars and selling drugs, whacked out on angel dust and with "a serious cocaine problem" by 14.

He "shoplifted habitually, now recalling how he used to try on sneakers he fancied then run out of the shop, without troubling the cashiers."

He was arrested in June of 1986 at 15, after he and two companion thugs chased some black kids from their neighborhood, throwing rocks at them and yelling racist epithets, obscenities and death threats.

"Kill the n-----s! Kill the n-----s!" Marky and his brave band screeched maniacally. "We don't like black n-----s in the area, so get the f--- away," they warned, giving chase.

The next day, encountering their victims again, heroic leading man Marky and company repeated their performance and succeeded in hitting two girls with rocks.

The complaint filed by the state was a civil rights action enjoining "the defendants from interfering with these rights by threats, coercion and intimidation." The Final Judgment prohibited Marky and his hate crime cohorts from "assaulting, threatening, intimidating or harassing...persons or property...because of that person's race color or national origin..." and was signed by Marky and his mother.

OK, so he was just a kid. Kids sometimes do stupid and hateful things, and people grow, people change. Marky grew and changed so much in the following two years, that in April of 1988, he attacked a Vietnamese man with a stick in an attempt to steal two cases of beer, later admitting being on alcohol and PCP at the time.

"Vietnam f---ing sh--!" Marky snarled, savagely hitting his victim in the head with a stick, knocking him senseless to the ground. After begging a second Vietnamese man to let him hide from the police, Marky sucker-punched the man in the eye, causing him to fall to the ground. After being placed under arrest, Marky "made numerous unsolicited racial statements about 'gooks' and 'slant-eyed gooks.' "

The victim Marky assaulted with the stick lost one of his "slanted" eyes. Marky, who had violated the terms of his earlier judgment, pled guilty to two counts of criminal contempt, each count carrying "a maximum penalty of ten years in a house of correction or ten thousand dollars or both." The Commonwealth's Sentencing Memorandum supported "the recommendation that the Defendant be sentenced to two years at the Deer Island House of Corrections, ninety days committed, with the balance suspended for two years."

Marky served 45 days. And he takes great pains these days to attest to how the experience turned his life around.

But it must not have turned him around too much, because in 1992, a complaint was filed against him that, while at a tennis court, "the defendant, Mark Wahlberg, a.k.a. Marky Mark, without provocation or cause, viciously and repeatedly kicked the plaintiff...in the face and jaw."

And, according to the complaint, it wasn't even a fair fight, but was actually pretty damn cowardly. At the time of the attack, it states, Marky's partner in assault "was holding the plaintiff...down on the ground. The plaintiff...had done nothing to provoke or warrant the attack by Mark Wahlberg, a.k.a. Marky Mark."

Reports of additional hate-filled violent attacks include:

People Magazine cites a [1993] brawl that broke out after he allegedly called one of Madonna's friends "a homo."

From React.com: "Marky Mark" Wahlberg has faced the judge four times on assault charges. He served 45 days in jail for participating in two attacks against Vietnamese men in 1988. In 1990, he was arrested in Boston for assaulting a police officer. And in 1992 he was arrested twice for assault, once for fighting with a security guard and the second time for participating in an assault on a teen by Wahlberg's bodyguard.

Part Three: "A Thousand Spears"

"Never send a monkey to do a man's job," Marky's heroic Planet of the Apes character, Major Leo Davidson declares. Aside from the fact that a guy with Marky's criminal record could never get in the military, we can suspend our disbelief. After all, Hollywood is built around the stuff of dreams.

"Our history is filled with men who have done amazing things," Major Marky instructs. Perhaps, had he not dropped out of school, he would be aware of that history, and of those men who authored our freedom and codified our inalienable right to keep and bear arms.

"Who would invent such a horrible thing?" asks chimp human rights activist Ari, naturally horrified and disgusted, like all good liberals, by Major Marky's handgun. Earlier in the film, incidentally, in a delicious bit of irony, she stopped a group of rowdy young apes, who were screaming threats and specist epithets, from throwing rocks at humans.

"That thing was going to keep us alive," Major Marky chides. What can he know that escapes his real-life counterpart? And why, if he equates promoting guns with villainy, does he allow his image to be marketed to children ("ages 4 and up") in the form of Hasbro action figures holding ... a gun?

"This has the power of a thousand spears," reveals General Thade's father, showing him an ancient, rusted handgun. The dying ape is portrayed, of course, by Marky-designated "villain" and disturbance source, Charlton Heston. "Against this, our strength means nothing."

Some have criticized Heston's performance, accusing him of being used by a leftist filmmaker to further alienate the public from guns. I didn't see it that way; first, the guy is an actor, and he was clearly playing a hateful creature, and second, he was illustrating how guns can be used to defend human life and liberty against ... ummm ... apes with sticks. Sticks that could put someone's eye out, or worse. More delicious irony, and it sounds pretty reasonable, to boot.

It is even more ironic that elitist Hollywood, the community that foists politically correct left-wing politicians and their stupid hate crime and gun control laws on us, would select a convicted hate criminal to play the role of hero, and a committed anti-gunner to extol the protective benefits of firearms in protecting human beings against violent apes.

Part Four: A Perfect Storm?

If you can believe People Magazine (and why wouldn't we?), Marky is a changed man. He regularly goes to Mass. He loves his mother. He donates to causes supporting underprivileged inner city kids. Has he really mellowed?

"I don't mind that much if people call me Marky Mark," he now says, so he must have. But I wonder if he'd mind people calling him "Maimy Maim"? Or "Gougey Gouge"?

But maybe it's true, and I'm being unfair. We are, all of us, sinners, all in need of forgiveness and redemption, and all capable of penitence and reformation. And we are, none of us, capable of perfection. When he tells us "I've done my share of bad," he is being truthful. So who am I to judge? Perhaps I should apologize?

Well, maybe I would, except for that dang gun thing Mr. Wahlberg chose to make an issue out of. It's not so much that he dissed Heston and the NRA, but because, by speaking out against legitimate firearm ownership in a forum as subversive as the MTV Awards, he has attacked all of us. He has contributed to a climate that encourages public contempt for guns and ridicule of gun owners, and this emboldens treasonous legislators to propose and enact further infringements on our rights. He has made it harder for human beings to defend themselves against the animals among us, the rowdy rock throwers, the attackers, the gougers, the apes.

Privileged people like the "plucky" Mr. Wahlberg have enabled abominations against individual human rights like ... the Lautenberg amendment. Remember Judy? And Lora? And Kathi? Wait a minute ... if they could be disarmed for life, for tearing pockets, throwing keys on the ground, and spanking children, if they cannot even TOUCH a gun, loaded or not, without committing a federal offense, how is it that Pokey Poke gets away with handling real guns, provided by federally licensed (including Class III) armorers, in movies like Three Kings and The Big Hit and The Corrupter? That the weapons were loaded with blanks is not the point; prohibited persons may not even touch a gun. And if a convicted cop can never be employed with a gun, why would an actor enjoy immunity in his employment?

Ahh, but there's the rub; Lautenberg applies to domestic violence. The "pokey" Mr. Wahlberg was only guilty of a ... a felony? Hold the phone!

Title I of the Gun Control Act of 1968 prohibits certain classes of persons from "purchasing, receiving or transporting firearms or ammunition in interstate commerce." Among these are persons "convicted of or under indictment for a felony ... Such persons correspondingly are prohibited from purchasing or otherwise acquiring any firearm or ammunition which has been shipped in interstate commerce."

One can hardly argue that moviemaking is not interstate commerce. And Marky's troubled past appears problematic in this regard.

Also problematic for the studios employing him may be 18 USC Chapter 44, Sec. 922, "Unlawful Acts", which states:

"It shall be unlawful for any person to sell or otherwise dispose of any firearm or ammunition to any person knowing or having reasonable cause to believe that such person - (1) is under indictment for, or has been convicted in any court of, a crime punishable by imprisonment for a term exceeding one year;"

Remember Marky's sentence? "Two years, 90 days committed, with the balance suspended for two years?" And Marky himself reportedly admitted in an interview for his porno film, Boogie Nights,

"This was Deer Island, in Massachusetts. I was there for about fifty days, but I'd been sentenced for about four years, with six months to serve."

So I approached the Suffolk County Clerk's Office for Criminal Business, the office for the court of jurisdiction in Marky's conviction, with three questions:

Has Mr. Wahlberg's record been expunged?

The answer was "No, it is public record."

Was defendant Wahlberg sentenced as a juvenile or as an adult?

"He was tried as an adult."

Was defendant Wahlberg convicted of a felony or a misdemeanor?

The representative explained to me how the "whole proceeding sounds so strange ... the judge had a penchant for doing strange things." He told me that normal procedures were not followed, and said that he had been involved in the case, but could not remember the details. He could not understand the reason behind the attorney general selecting those particular charges in light of the circumstances of the case, and speculated on the climate of the time, how the area was still adjusting to the issue of bussing, how Marky was pretty typical of kids coming from the area known as "Savage Hill," and how he met him once and he seemed "nice." He assured me that he was not trying to evade my question, but that, without a cite, his answer had to be "I don't know." He then referred me to someone who might, Marky's attorney of record, Francis W. Quinn.

Mr. Quinn informed me that "without acknowledging that [he] was Mr. Wahlberg's attorney," he could not speak to me about the matter unless I had "a written release from Mr. Wahlberg authorizing [him] to do so."

If anti-gun Mr. Wahlberg is a federal gun felon, he has left a trail of evidence that clearly shows him violating federal proscriptions on numerous occasions. If so, it would seem that anti-gun Hollywood producers and directors may have compounded and abetted felonious acts by procuring and providing weapons to a prohibited person. If this is so, charges could be filed against all parties, federal firearms licenses lost, fines levied, and prison sentences imposed, just as would happen if the violator was Judy, or Lora, or Kathi, or a person who knowingly provided them with guns.

Have the anti-gun Mr. Wahlberg and his anti-gun employers created a perfect storm, one that has now caught them up in its path?

A chronology of Marky's films follows. Perhaps some of them will one day serve as courtroom exhibits. Perhaps on that day, he will wish that this country didn't have so many gun control laws. Perhaps he will then realize that, when deprived of the means to protect life and liberty, human beings become either subjects or prey for those who would "rule the planet."

People's Exhibit A:?

2001: Rock Star
2001: Planet of the Apes
2000: The Perfect Storm
2000: The Yards
1999: Three Kings
1999: The Corruptor
1999: The Yards
1998: The Big Hit
1997: Boogie Nights
1997: Traveller
1996: Fear
1995: The Basketball Diaries
1994: Renaissance Man
__________________

gunsmith
October 6, 2006, 05:10 AM
because that other thread got me steamed...

Hard to believe Hunter would allow that creep mary mark to ruin a perfectly good film...disgusting!

PlayboyPenguin
October 6, 2006, 05:15 AM
I guess I can join this boycott...since I never planned to see the film in the first place. I am not a big Mark Walberg fan. :)

SHOOT1SAM
October 6, 2006, 09:02 AM
gunsmith:

I wouldn't be too quick to condemn Stephen Hunter for the choice of "Maimy Mark" to portray Bob Lee Swagger. He very likely had to relinquish any and all rights to having say-so on the film. He is probably credited as a "creative consultant", trying to keep the script/film as true to his book as possible, but I seriously doubt that he had any influence on who the cast or director was.

That being said, David Codrea's article sounds like a great foundation for a pro-gun US Attorney to bring charges and shake the elitist, leftist film industry to its very core!

Sam

strambo
October 6, 2006, 02:00 PM
Yes, I doubt Hunter has any say in this at all. I didn't know all that about Marky Mark...great article. Lautenburg amend...makes me mad everytime I think about it.:fire: :banghead: :cuss:

Evil Monkey
October 6, 2006, 02:06 PM
I've been to the theaters exactly 3 times in my life. Boycotting this one will be real easy.:cool:

Bruce333
October 6, 2006, 02:20 PM
Be aware that the movie's called "Shooter" now, not "Point of Impact".

http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/1809733437/details

carlrodd
October 6, 2006, 02:44 PM
i have no problem avoiding that film, and i'm not even a fan of m. mark, but i REALLY wanted to see the new scorcese film 'the departed'. he's in it, and so is matt dumbin. i actually saw an interview with matt damon going on about how he didn't have a problem being in such a violent movie, because the violence in it comes with consequence to ALL the characters. whatever moron....i could find it really easy to compromise my 'convictions' too if somebody was waving a multi-million dollar paycheck in my face. what's are his excuses for all of the other violent movies he's been in? and what is scorcese thinking? i always assumed he had a healthy respect our right to keep arms....maybe not, keeping company with the deluded, self-obsessed likes of damon and marky mark.

mogunner
October 6, 2006, 03:07 PM
Great Book. But, will have no problem boycotting this anti gun freakoid Mark Wahlberg in the Movie Version. That is correct regarding the change of name to "The Shooter".

romma
October 6, 2006, 03:14 PM
Morky-Mork is jealous of the 2nd ammendment, Charlton Heston, and the NRA and everyone that is allowed by law to legally possess firearms. Alot of people that can't have something, don't want you to either. That's why politicions that have been convicted of felonies and disqualifying misdemeanors have NO BUSINESS effecting any firearms legislation at all...

psyopspec
October 6, 2006, 03:18 PM
Well, hate to let everyone down, but I'll be attending Shooter and probably The Departed as well. I do not respect Matt Damon, Marky Mark, Tom Cruise, Ben Affleck, George Clooney, Liv Tyler, Martin Scorcese, Sandra Bullock et al for their political views. I won't lose sleep if they drink and drive, hate Jews, love the Constitution, burn the flag, follow a non-mainstream religion, or cross dress, much the same way that they won't lose sleep if I do/believe any of those things.

Some of you act as if the discovery of Mark Wahlberg as a gun-hater with a criminal record involved some hard-hitting investigative journalism. Guess what? He's not the only one. Hell, even Joss Whedon (creator of Firefly) says and does things inconsistent with what his audience might expect. From the horse's mouth:

So many people are acting like there's little difference between Kerry and Bush and that is not the case. If you're for Bush I doubt I can sway you but if you're one of those people grumbling about politicians all being the same I'm begging you to look hard at the facts and at the smirking face of the man who is doing more damage to this country than any president in my lifetime. We cannot let apathy decide our fate. I'm sounding all soapbox-y but I am truly afraid for our economic infrastucture, our dwindling natural reserves and most of all our place in the world. We need to act.

-http://whedonesque.com/?comments=5133#38839

My point here isn't to redirect any hatred toward Whedon (I happen to love the show and the movie). Rather, my point is that Hollywood and those in it tend to be liberal and not like guns, but big deal.

I expect actors to entertain me. That's it. If it's a good movie, they've done their part as far as I'm concerned.

For the record, all of you signing on for this boycott better do more than not see the movie. Genuine boycotting includes letting the entity that you're boycotting know the reason why you're not seeing the movie. I do wish all of you the best of luck with it, but please stop acting like it's a big surprise everytime a celebrity comes out against guns.

romma
October 6, 2006, 03:20 PM
BTW, I'snt possesion of a facsimile of a firearm a crime for convicted felons? If so, what business does this "actor" have touching one?

Justin
October 6, 2006, 03:25 PM
Sometimes I have to wonder if some of you guys get spit on your monitor when you type.

Closed for waaaay too much noise, not enough signal.

rangerruck
December 22, 2006, 04:09 AM
it is called 'shooter' stars mark Wahlberg as a retired miitary sniper, asked to come out to do one more job, he is then blamed for an asassination attempt. looking at the trailer, it looks like he uses a couple of very modlular, hk's or sako's, or mgi rifles, could not tell the cals, though. Also looks to be using some very good, stalk, stealth, camo techniques, with one shot in the snow being very nice. check here
http://www.ropeofsilicon.com/movies.php?id=3180

FireArmFan
December 22, 2006, 04:26 AM
looks pretty decent, i'll check it out. I heard somewhere (can't remember where) that Mark Wahlberg a kind of anti gun. Is that true? He's done a number of movies with a large amount of gun frequency, but i guess they all do it for the money like daniel craig.

Outlaws
December 22, 2006, 04:36 AM
Great. It starts out like Commando (hard man to find in the wilderness), moves on to a sort of JFK conspiracy (ex-Marine framed for an assassination), and then moves into the typical, "I didn't do it, it was the one armed man."

Heads he lives, tails he dies.

hksw
December 22, 2006, 10:28 AM
06/00 : Mark Wahlberg and George Clooney hit out at Charlton Heston by suggesting the actor should win best villain award at this year's MTV MOVIE AWARDS - because of his notorious love for guns. Clooney and Wahlberg attended the prestigious movie awards to present the best villain category on Saturday. And Wahlberg stunned the star-studded audience by suggesting Heston would be a good candidate because he heads up the National Rifle Association. Wahlberg says, "I believe Charlton Heston is America's best villain because he loves guns so much. Maybe he should get the award for being president of the National Rifle Association."

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000032/news

buzz_knox
December 22, 2006, 10:31 AM
Sounds like the Point of Impact movie they've been talking about has been heavily revamped.

max popenker
December 22, 2006, 10:31 AM
Looks as it is based on Stephen Hunter's novel "Sniper". Not that bad a novel, but we'll see how much Hollyweird will damage it

Bruce333
December 22, 2006, 10:34 AM
Don't you think this movie has enough threads?

http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=186701

http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=225767

http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=186625

B.D. Turner
December 22, 2006, 10:36 AM
After sleeping through Sniper II I'll give anything a try.

TheArchDuke
December 22, 2006, 11:23 AM
That rifle that looks like a .50 cal has absolutely zero recoil...also there's no hole in the barrel.

MD_Willington
December 22, 2006, 01:18 PM
Dirk Diggler: Sniper Nights :neener:

mljdeckard
December 22, 2006, 01:24 PM
It's based on Point of Impact, which is a fantastic book, but it's going to have to be twisted in half to even put Wahlberg in the lead.

I also strongly suspect that they will skip over the detail in the book that made it great. (Hunter really knows what he is talking about.)

Someone in here quoted Wahlberg, that when he met Charleton Heston in the process of filming "Planet of the Apes" a few years ago, he shook his hand and said, "It's very disturbing to meet you."

Zero_DgZ
December 22, 2006, 01:31 PM
Originally Written by Marilyn Manson:

Everything has been said before
Nothing left to say anymore
When it's all the same
You can ask for it by name

...

Jrsmith
December 22, 2006, 01:34 PM
I was going to say; that sure sounds a whole lot like Point of Impact; which is such a great book that I shudder to see how they mangle it. But, who knows, maybe it'll acually be... good. Nah.

meef
December 22, 2006, 01:35 PM
It's so ironic every time one of these anti-gun movie star, etc. whores turns their latest trick for the big bucks.

Freakin' hypocrites.

:fire:

Jim March
December 22, 2006, 02:48 PM
It is illegal for Walburg to be anywhere near a real gun. He's a convicted felon.

http://www.keepandbeararms.com/information/XcIBViewItem.asp?ID=2360

BamBam-31
December 22, 2006, 03:44 PM
Great read, Jim. Pokey Poke....LOL! :p

Hogfan1911
December 23, 2006, 02:00 PM
:barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: Anyone who's read Point of Impact & knows anything about how Hollywood adapts books for the big screen will know to avoid this crap. Marky Mark as Bob Lee Swagger???? That's a bigger travesty than Alec Baldwin as Jack Ryan. Or Alec Baldwin as Gen. Jimmy Doolittle. Or Willem Dafoe as John Clark. Will the Funky Bunch have supporting roles as FBI agents? How about Prince to play the loyal sidekick who always buys it in the end? Jessica Simpson as the love interest? Ok, then maybe it'll be worth renting:evil:

mljdeckard
December 23, 2006, 02:12 PM
Except that, it never actually says that he was convicted of a felony. He COMMITTED numerous felonies.

I don't like him either, but at the same time, I despise Michael Moore for exaggerating the same way that article does.

LkWinnipesaukee
December 23, 2006, 02:48 PM
I also strongly suspect that they will skip over the detail in the book that made it great. (Hunter really knows what he is talking about.)

Which detail is that?


Ok guys, who would be the best actor for the part of Bob Lee?

I dont know...Sean Connery??? Wahlberg is too young

Justin
December 23, 2006, 02:55 PM
Closed as duplicate.

Norton
December 31, 2006, 05:31 PM
http://www.shootermovie.com/

Arrrgghhhh.....I feel like they are taking one of my favorite books from me.

Marky Mark as Bob Lee Swagger......not a chance.

Danny Glover is one of the RamDyne guys.

Norton
December 31, 2006, 05:40 PM
I was thinking that this guy (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0242882/) from The Unit would have made a good Bob Lee, but of course they didn't consult me :p

Huddog
December 31, 2006, 05:44 PM
I love the Swager books, a triology I believe. Isn't Walberg too young to play Swager in this book? Of course I doubt they will make the other two. It looks like a decent movie, I guess I need to dig out the book and reread it so I can grip about all the things they do wrong. If it is like most book become movies it won't be as good as the book.

swampgator
December 31, 2006, 05:45 PM
Multiple threads exist on this topic.

JohnKSa
December 31, 2006, 05:51 PM
Casting is bad. Looks like they tried to "fix" the story--it doesn't need it.

Might still be a good movie.

pdowg881
December 31, 2006, 05:55 PM
that trailer reminds me of that movie "most wanted" with one of those wayans brothers.

Walkalong
December 31, 2006, 06:48 PM
The book was excellent. Looking forward to the movie.

Fly320s
December 31, 2006, 07:13 PM
The trailer is available... www.shootermovie.com

So, what books have the Swagger character? I'd like to read on or two.

chickenfried
December 31, 2006, 07:22 PM
Why Mark Wahlberg!!!!!! :mad:
These have swagger
1993 Point of Impact
1994 Dirty White Boys
1996 Black Light
1998 Time to Hunt

I'm not sure about these
2000 Hot Springs
2001 Pale Horse Coming
2003 Havana

mons meg
December 31, 2006, 07:45 PM
It's been a while since I read POI, but isn't Bob the Nailer a Vietnam vet? The action in POI is in the late 80s, so the character should at least be in his 40s, right? I mean, I understand if they need to update the screenplay for 2007, but IMO the idea was for the character to be a veteran scout/sniper. Like in the movie...uh...Sniper? ;)

grimjaw
December 31, 2006, 07:49 PM
Starship Troopers

:eek:

I'll stay away if they abort it that badly. ST the movie was so hacked, it hurts me to think about it.

jm

Otherguy Overby
December 31, 2006, 07:50 PM
This makes me wish I was a federal prosecutor. I'd go out, rent a bunch of action movies and file charges against every felon with a gun I saw. Then I'd file charges against all the executive enablers who provided firearms to felons.

Of course that would either get Lautenberg repealed, or more likely create an exception for movie felons.

Travis McGee
December 31, 2006, 08:02 PM
There will just be a few "minor" changes in the Hollywood script.

They are combining the Swagger and Memphis characters, and making him a fun-loving ATF agent, who was a Viet Nam anti-war activist, who lost his wife to Gun Violence.

/sarcasm

DRZinn
December 31, 2006, 11:18 PM
I was thinking that this guy from The Unit would have made a good Bob Lee,I heartilt disagree, but think the Colonel from The Unit would be perfect. That'd be Robert Patrick.

Bruce333
December 31, 2006, 11:32 PM
Ok ...this makes 5 threads on this movie....

http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=186625
http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=225767
http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=186701
http://thehighroad.org/showthread.php?t=242598

ElToro
December 31, 2006, 11:59 PM
I read the stepehen hunter novels while working graveyard security in '94. that job lasted about 3 weeks. couldnt stay up all night.

I always envisisoned Tommy lee Jones. R Lee Ermey could do a good job as well.

All the Hunter books are good.

I think the ones with his father are even better. When Castro dies, mayeb they could make Havana...

gunsmith
January 1, 2007, 12:03 AM
He must know how the gun community feels about markymark?!

jeepmor
January 1, 2007, 12:07 AM
Are there any actors out there that actually look like Carlos Hathcock?


I thought that was Billy Bob Thornton at first, he'd work wouldn't he. If you were going for a look a like. I don't know Billy Bob's stance on guns, but being he started out in Hollywood as an obvious redneck type (no offense anyone), he might be perfect.

steveracer
January 1, 2007, 01:02 AM
soooo, who's 40ish and can pull it off?
Not politically, but from a performance standpoint. Forget these old guys. Sam Elliott? Seriously? He's old enough to play him in 2007, but too old for 1983. Think about it.
So, who's left?
I like the idea of a great actor, but a quiet no-name is probably better. Marky Mark, not my first choice, of course.
I'd like it to be a break for someone new, because that's what it needs. New, beacause this type of character hasn't been seen for thirty-odd years.
And the vietnam stuff is imperative to the story, but will be lost on today's primary audience. These moviegoers don't know anything about the Nam. (like I know what the hell I'm talking about. I was born in 74.)

Travis McGee
January 1, 2007, 08:33 AM
If Swagger is going to be a VN vet in a movie set today, he's going to have to be in his 60s: too old for the part. They will probably change his "era" to Desert Storm, to get the ages right. That means dropping the 100 kills sniper part. IOW, the book is too old to set in 2007, without major rework.

mons meg
January 1, 2007, 10:07 AM
They are combining the Swagger and Memphis characters, and making him a fun-loving ATF agent, who was a Viet Nam anti-war activist, who lost his wife to Gun Violence.

SOME of us are trying to eat our oatmeal right now...you're not helping. :D

The Lone Haranguer
January 1, 2007, 10:29 AM
Originally posted by ReadyOnTheRight:
I always pictured Clint Eastwood when reading those books.
Interestingly, in Time to Hunt a supporting character described him as looking like Clint Eastwood - and talking like Gomer Pyle. ;)

Mark Wahlberg? Good grief. :rolleyes: Since Bob's character is described as lean and "sinewy" with piercing eyes and Clint is too old, I always thought ...
http://www.movie-gazette.com/directory/img/ed+harris.jpg
... might make a good Bob, except AFAIK he isn't Southern.

SHOOT1SAM
January 1, 2007, 10:44 AM
Multiple threads or not, I can't understand why so many expect the movie to be nearly as good as the book. Has anyone ever read a book then seen the movie, and thought that the movie was better, or even as good?

I can personally think of three. Three for me, in 44 years.

"The Outlaw, Josey Wales" was in my opinion, a much better movie than a book. It was adapted from the book Gone to Texas, BUT, I'd seen the movie something like 22 times before I read the book, so I may have been biased.

The mini-series "Lonesome Dove" was adapted the most accurately from its book, in my opinion. Leaving out the bull / grizzly bear fight did not detract from the series.

Finally, The Stand (the original book, not the un-abridged version) which I've read at least 15 times, was a wonderfully adapted mini-series. Of course there was no way to incorporate all the aspects of King's imagination into film, but they did a great job.

Now that I've mentioned Stephen King, I'll have to update my number to 4; 4 in 44 years.

A mini-series of The Shining, starring Stephen Weber (the goofy brother from the TV series "Wings") was superb. Kubrick's film with Jack Nicholson was horrendous.

Point-of-Impact will likely be along the lines of Kubrick's "Shining"; just enough of the book in the movie to remind you of it, but nowhere true to the book.

Sam

MikeWSC
January 1, 2007, 10:52 AM
There's been a few, the movies made from Louis Lamour's books have been very good. Course, Mr. Lamour helped in making them, and John Wayne,
Tom Selleck, Sam Elliot.... great cowboy actors!

Best in the New Year......... Mike

LawDog
January 1, 2007, 11:22 AM
Multiple threads on this subject merged.

LawDog

CannonFodder
January 1, 2007, 12:15 PM
Sounds good . . . but then I remember what "they" did to The Sum of All Fears . . .

Make a movie that, while it departed heavily from the book, had some excellent directing and some great performances, as well as a few set pieces that just knocked your socks off?

I'd be all over that.

bill2
January 2, 2007, 11:35 AM
Liam Niessen (spelling?) would be great for the part. He played a southerner in some Patrick Swayze film and did a great job. and he can look the part.

I really hope Hollywood doesn't screw up this book - I have read it about 8 times and really loved it.

Cross your fingers.

eldomatic
January 5, 2007, 03:11 PM
Robert Duvall, if he was 25 years younger, or Sam Shepard if he wasn't shacking-up with a left-wing moonbat would make a good Bob the Nailer.

And so would Ed Harris; he was great as the psychopath bad guy in "A History of Violence."

swampgator
January 5, 2007, 11:44 PM
I can't understand why so many expect the movie to be nearly as good as the book. Has anyone ever read a book then seen the movie, and thought that the movie was better, or even as good?

I can personally think of three. Three for me, in 44 years.

Open Range with Kevin Costner and Robert Duval:
The movie was much better than the book.

Big Trouble with Tim Allen and Rene Russo:
As good - it's almost a word for word adaptation of Dave Barry's book.


Swagger's Age:
Point of Impact starts in late 1991 or very early 1992. Not sure when opening day of deer season is in Arkansas. Swagger was born in 1946, so during POI he's 45 or 46.

MFortie
January 6, 2007, 07:35 PM
I like David Morse; he'd make a good Swagger.

Regards,

Mark

ReadyontheRight
January 6, 2007, 07:56 PM
Originally posted by ReadyOnTheRight:
I always pictured Clint Eastwood when reading those books.

Interestingly, in Time to Hunt a supporting character described him as looking like Clint Eastwood - and talking like Gomer Pyle.

Mark Wahlberg? Good grief. Since Bob's character is described as lean and "sinewy" with piercing eyes and Clint is too old, I always thought ...


[Pic of Ed Harris]

... might make a good Bob, except AFAIK he isn't Southern.

That is funny. I always pictured Ed Harris for John Clarke in "Without Remorse" by Tom Clancy -- Which is very similar to "Time to Hunt." But he just kept getting older with no movie...

ReadyontheRight
January 6, 2007, 08:06 PM
I like David Morse; he'd make a good Swagger.

Problem is...many of the guys mentioned above are in their 50s-70s.

We're all getting older and it's Keanu Reeves, Marky Mark, Nicholas Cage and the like who ARE into or pushin' 40s.

ReadyontheRight
January 6, 2007, 08:23 PM
I just mentioned this thread to my wife and she came up with the perfect actor:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/4f/Donnie_wahlberg_clipton.jpg

swampgator
January 7, 2007, 12:14 AM
ReadyontheRight,

I thought the same thing when I heard Mark Wahlberg was being cast. They got the wrong brother! Donnie is a better choice in my opinion.

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