SA M1A Disassembly problems


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History Prof
January 3, 2007, 07:05 PM
About a year ago, my oldest brother passed away and I inherited his Springfield M1A Scout Squad Rifle. According to my S.I.L, he never had the chance to fire it (he bought it in the early stages of his cancer and wanted to get to the range with it but never did). It was NIB (or appeared to be) when I brought it home. It has been in the safe since March of last year, and only yesterday did I get a chance to fire it. After only 80 rounds, I can see wear and tear on it that was not on it before I fired it. It is the best dang 7.62 I have ever fired. After checking the sights, I sat and rang the 400Meter gong at the range about 50 out of 70 shots.

But the problem started when I started to clean it. I assumed that it should disassemble the same as a Mini-14, but after opening the trigger guard, I couldn't remove it. I checked the manual, and sure enough I was doing everything right. Then I noticed that there appears to be absolutely no gaps between the stock and the metal. I'm wondering if someone might have glass bedded this thing, F**'d up big time, and glued the metal parts into the stock.

I'm hoping someone who owns one of these could answer a few questions: Is the fit that close? Do I just need to pull harder on the trigger guard? Is it possible to screw up as I suspect? I've never glass bedded a stock, but I remember reading on how to do it once, and I seem to remember that the metal has to be coated with something to keep from gluing it onto the stock.

TIA.

See S.A.'s web site at http://www.springfield-armory.com/images/rifles/AA9126Large.jpg for an image. Mine is identical minus the scope and the bipod.

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30Cal
January 3, 2007, 07:30 PM
Can you get the trigger group out? Make sure the trigger guard is swung fully open--if the mag catch pin shifts, it can block the full range of movement of the trigger guard and you're in for a long day.

If it's bedded, you'd know it. Once the bedding is cured, the action must be removed from the stock to clean up the clay and to reassemble the rifle.

Ty

RockRifle
January 3, 2007, 09:26 PM
I think 30cal hit the nail on the head. If your trigger guard doesn't roll all the way out, you are not going to get it out. It has to disengage from the receiver, and there is stock surrounding it. I had that pin walk on me once, out of the blue, and there is no way to get a tool on it. luckily, it is an inexpensive roll pin; It will shear if you lever open the trigger guard, and then the trigger group should come out in your hand.
If you have a garand smith nearby, he will probably have parts for it. Springfield will definitely have them. You might find a temporary fix at a local parts shop until the real part comes in. (simple roll pin, the length of which is the width of the trigger group. It will be shorter when you get it out... a replacement should be the same diameter.

History Prof
January 3, 2007, 11:18 PM
Thanks for the help, guys. I checked the trigger guard again, and it opened as far as mechanically possible, so the roll pin wasn't the problem (although I see how it could obviously become one).

Since the trigger guard was opening all the way I reasoned that it was free from the receiver. So I found a small gap and gently pried the receiver from the stock with a flathead screw driver. It was stuck, too, but not nearly as bad as the trigger group. Once I had the receiver off, I was able to push the trigger group out from the top. I don't know what had it stuck, but it looks liked dried resin or something. You can see white spots on the stock and the metal parts where they were "glued" together. :shrug: Well, at least I got it to come off.

http://thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=50435&stc=1&d=1167880400
http://thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=50434&stc=1&d=1167879897

Again, thanks for your help, guys.

30Cal
January 4, 2007, 01:08 PM
Odd. I'd hit that with a razor blade and acetone before you stick it back together. Is that the black crinkle coat lifting up?

FWIW, if you run into troubles in the future, put a dowel down through the top and tap against the mag latch to get the trigger group out. Do the same up through the bottom against the underside of the receiver heel to get the action out.

pbhome71
January 4, 2007, 03:53 PM
Once I had the receiver off, I was able to push the trigger group out from the top. I don't know what had it stuck, but it looks liked dried resin or something. You can see white spots on the stock and the metal parts where they were "glued" together. :shrug: Well, at least I got it to come off.


My loaded M1A has the same problem. IMHO, this is because the paint that SA uses stick to the metal part at pressure points.

I wouldn't worry about it.

BTW, the rifle looks much better with the real M14 metal buttplate instead of the rubber pad that come with the rifle. If you can find one, you might want to check that out. The drawback of using the metal plate is the LOP will be reduced by about 1". This turned to be a + for me. YMMV.

-Pat...

History Prof
January 4, 2007, 09:18 PM
IMHO, this is because the paint that SA uses stick to the metal part at pressure points.That seems about right. The white marks wouldn't come off of the stock, but came off (mostly) of the metal parts.

As for the metal buttplate, I can imagine it does look better. But I am 6'3" and have long arms. I need the extra LOP. When I owned Ruger Minis, I always had to add that buttpad, even though it looked goofy, and I don't like AR-15 SP1s either...

cuervo
January 4, 2007, 09:42 PM
...to break the action away from the stock once the trigger group is out is to sit down and "break" the rifle across your knee. With the sights up, hold the barrel with one hand and the end of the stock with the other. Put the rifle on your knee about where the trigger group would go. Bounce your knee up and down while holding the two ends and the action will pivot out of the stock.

Bwana John
January 4, 2007, 10:42 PM
IMHO, this is because the paint that SA uses stick to the metal part at pressure points.
+1, the crinkle paint SA inc. uses on their stocks seems really cheap.

geekWithA.45
January 5, 2007, 01:08 AM
Heck, I totally forgot about that!

Yeah, I had krinkle paint issues my first time too.

Not a problem you'll run into again.

Incidentally, you DO know that M1As only ought to be stripped once a yearish, right?

Excessive disassembly mucks with the tightness of the fit of the rifle to the stock.

The summary of the maintenance routine for this is:


Normal cleaning after shooting:

-Use chamber brush
-Use bore brush
-Wet & Dry patches
-Wipe out action
-Lightly grease rollers, lugs, etc
-DO NOT LUBRICATE THE TRIGGER GROUP! Intended to be bone dry, might double or run away during firing.

Every 500ish rounds, or when the gas piston does not move freely with gravity:

-Unscrew the gas system
-Drop out the gas piston
-Use the drills
-Clean exterior of piston w/ scruffy sponge
-Reassemble, do not lubricate, intended to run dry.

Once a yearish:

Detail strip & clean the snot out of everything.

Onmilo
January 5, 2007, 10:33 AM
That last post only applies to glass bedded rifles in my opinion.
It is quite alright to regularly field strip a standard M1A.
Fiberglass stocks maintain their structural integrity through hundreds if not thousands of disassembly-reassembly routines.
Wooden stocks will wear quicker than fiberglass but if you do not relieve the pressure on the stock from time to time the wood will compress much more quickly and you will end up with a loose stock much quicker than if you take the gun down and allow the wood to expand and contract regularly.

Part of that tight fit problem you are experiencing may be associated with the commercial parts Springfield Inc. is now using.
They are larger and thicker castings.
The parts are not the same as the Mil-Spec and thinner USGI forged parts.

The black crinkle finished stocks are USGI fiberglass stocks that Sping Inc., has refinished even though they will not admit this and the commercial parts fit up much tighter than they should in these stocks.

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