270 win 100 grain for deer


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rwmcquigge
January 23, 2007, 10:33 PM
is the 100 grain soft point to light for deer in .270 win.:confused:

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rbernie
January 23, 2007, 10:50 PM
Likely yes - they're varmint bullets and are very lightly constructed.

BIGR
January 23, 2007, 11:57 PM
It appears that the 130 GR. may be one of the best bullets for deer. The 100 GR. would probably be better for varmits.

hank327
January 24, 2007, 12:23 AM
Definately too light for deer. Go with the 130 or 140 grain bullets for deer.
The Hornady 140 grain spire points are especially accurate in my Model 70 Featherweight.

bub8889
January 24, 2007, 09:04 AM
My first thought also was that it's to light.

I know many people, myself included, that shoot 80-100gr bullets in .243 and never have a problem and we consider these bullets "heavy enough"

But my first reaction is to consider a 100gr psp; the same GN and bullet I shoot in .243; in a bigger caliber IE. 270 to be to light, where is the logic in this.

I really don't see why it won't work, the light recoil should help shot placement also.

Bitmap
January 24, 2007, 09:23 AM
My guess would be that it would work if you handload it down to a lower velocity and plan on making broadside shots into the rib cage.

I think the 100gr. bullets are usually designed to disintegrate and don't have much penetration at their "normal" velocity.

If you really want or need to do this (for kids or due to a shoulder injury or something) I would look for loading data with the lowest velocity you can find. Then try it on things like coyotes or small feral pigs to see if the bullet penetrates or comes apart.

BTW Remington makes a Managed Recoil load in .270. They use CoreLokt bullets designed to have more penetration and controlled expansion instead of using a bullet designed for varmints. It uses a 115gr. at about 2700. I don't know if that bullet is available for handloading.

Here is the link:

http://www.remington.com/products/ammunition/ballistics/results/default.aspx?type=centerfire&cal=17

Charles S
January 24, 2007, 09:55 AM
The short answer is no.

I know many people, myself included, that shoot 80-100gr bullets in .243 and never have a problem and we consider these bullets "heavy enough"

That is true, but a 243 bullet at 100 grains has a sectional density of .242 on the other hand a 270 bullet at 100 grains has a sectional density of .186, the excellent 130 grain 270 bullet has a sectional density of .242. So in reality the 100 grain 243 bullet and the 130 grain 270 bullet should, theoretically have similar terminal performance (that is discounting momentum).

The accepted minimum sectional density for hunting medium game is .200 to .210.

Sectional density is a bullet's weight in pounds divided by the square of its diameter in inches, and is an fairly reliable predictor of terminal performance.

An excellent article on sectional density.

http://www.chuckhawks.com/sd_beginners.htm

The second and actually more important reason is bullet construction. Typically in light for caliber weight bullets, manufacturers design the bullet to expand very rapidly - simply the bullets are constructed to perform like a varmint bullet with explosive terminal performance. The medium to heavier weight for caliber bullets are constructed to provide a more controlled expansion and better penetration for larger animals. This is true of the 243, 270, 30-06 and others. The very heavy, for caliber, bullet tend to be constructed in an even tougher manner for the largest game, ie the 180 grain 30 caliber bullets are considered adequate for Elk.

So a 243 100 grain bullet is designed to perform well on medium sized game, but the 100 grain 270 bullet is designed as a varmint load.

But my first reaction is to consider a 100gr psp; the same GN and bullet I shoot in .243; in a bigger caliber IE. 270 to be to light, where is the logic in this.

The logic in this in an understanding of bullet construction an sectional density. Can a 100 grain 270 caliber work for deer? Yes, is it a good choice? No. Can if an individual choose a more toughly constructed bullet (Barnes X) and do better, yes and no. The Barnes will perform better than the average 100 grain 270 bullet, but it still lacks the sectional density to reliably give good penetration on oblique shots.

Pumpkinheaver
January 24, 2007, 11:55 PM
A good friend of mine bragged and bragged last year about his .270 load with a light for caliber HP. I advised him to use at least a 130 gr bullet. He didn't listen and had to eat crow when he shot a nice buck and never found him.

hossfly
February 1, 2007, 04:33 PM
You can lose a deer with a perfect bullet if the shot isn't placed well. I know guys who successfully use 100 grn. 270's. Having said that, it is typically considered a varmint bullet. I would recommend 130 or 140 grainers.

Art Eatman
February 1, 2007, 05:16 PM
Charles S hit the X in the 10ring with:

"Typically in light for caliber weight bullets, manufacturers design the bullet to expand very rapidly - simply the bullets are constructed to perform like a varmint bullet with explosive terminal performance. The medium to heavier weight for caliber bullets are constructed to provide a more controlled expansion and better penetration for larger animals."

it's not so much the light weight versus the heavy weight as it is the construction of the bullet. A varmint-type bullet when used on larger animals can blow up and make a relatively shallow, crater-like wound on the entry side of an animal. Yeah, the deer might die, but you'd play billyhell finding him.

Art

Geno
February 1, 2007, 05:19 PM
One needs to simply refer to the charts and suggestions regarding sectional density (S.D.), unless you are using a solid, such as some form f "X Bullet".

That said, the 90 Gn and 100 Gn are typically varmint loads per the S.D.

Doc2005

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