Best/worst Gun AUTHORS (of fiction)


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boomer1911a1
February 12, 2007, 11:39 AM
Unlike tbreed's very-worthwhile thread elsewhere under this category, I want to hear about novelists and writers who do either really good or really bad jobs of putting guns down on paper.

I'll start off. Mine are all good because I tend to forget/dismiss the bad ones and remember the ones I like...

David Morrell
The author of around 20 excellent thrillers, Morrell began his writing career with First Blood, which was the basis for the Stallone movies. He has always shown a fine sense of weapon knowledge (despite an early habit of calling propellant "cordite"... a habit he has since corrected.) His later books, especially, shown a great deal of research and attention to detail.

Robert B. Parker
Follower of Raymond Chandler, creater of the Spenser series as well as the newer Jesse Stone And Sunny Randall books, Parker has always put in enough detail about weapons to qualify. Aside from a jarring early reference to the M-16 rifle being chambered in "7.62 mm," his gun knowledge is pretty firm and always poetic.

Thomas Harris
You know him best from the Hannibal Lecter movies/books, although he also did the novel Black Sunday about the blimp attack on the Super Bowl (talk about a movie crying out for a remake...) Harris has always sounded gun-savvy. The opening gunfight in Hannibal was gorgeous and sublime in the novel, later ruined (among a great many other things) in the movie.


Let me hear some others. I'm anxious to expand.

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mpmarty
February 12, 2007, 11:44 AM
Robert Ludlum is the worst; he puts safetys on revolvers, silencers on revolvers, clips on UZIs, cordite is the only propellant he has ever heard of, and when the hero picks up a revolver from a bad guy he takes his extra clips with him!! He sucks.:barf:

Biker
February 12, 2007, 11:50 AM
Jerry Ahern is right up at the top. The man knows his guns. Check out "The Survivalist" series.

Biker

ClarkEMyers
February 12, 2007, 11:52 AM
Disagree about Parker - Spenser. There is a little research in what Parker and in what Jess Stone carry and use. The Gray Man used a .458 Win Mag bolt gun in a rather silly fashion to shoot Spenser and the entire book on the Earps was full of silly and avoidable mistakes. It's a testimony to the author's other skills that I overlook his mistakes on guns - much as I will allow a B movie western to have a Win 94 play the role of the Winchester 73 and Peacemaker/Frontier to play the role of a an earlier revolver. Parker acknowledges doing research on Boston for one of his non-series books writing "God help me I thought I knew enough" but Parker apparently either thinks he knows enough about firearms or doesn't care and neither do his editors. Decent books bad gun play.

Donald Hamilton is the best of the successful writers in dealing with guns - and of course his book Donald Hamilton on Guns and Hunting and his articles in Gun Digest and the gun press are right on as well.

Gavin Lyall does a first rate job including especially the Mauser in Midnight Plus One.

taliv
February 12, 2007, 12:21 PM
mpmarty beat me to it. ludlum is teh suq

Firehand
February 12, 2007, 12:27 PM
Donald Hamilton in the Matt Helm books was very good. Knew what he was writing about.

My brain blanked right now, sci-fi author who wrote a book Rivers of Time about hunting dinosaurs was awful. Insisted his clients carry a .600 Nitro Express because "it's the only rifle powerful enough to knock a dinosaur down", etc. Absolute crap.

Dirty Bob
February 12, 2007, 12:29 PM
Stephen Hunter is generally good, although the plot of Point of Impact hinged on a few rather improbable gun-related issues.

Regards,
Dirty Bob

JesseL
February 12, 2007, 12:44 PM
Correia and Nightcrawler!! :D

Hutch
February 12, 2007, 12:46 PM
Fully agree that Ludlum is invincibly ignorant. I even wrote him a letter many years ago, offering to proof/edit his stuff. No response, funny that. Here's another gun-Muggle: Jack Higgins. 25 millimetre (Brit, I s'pose) Colt auto, anyone?

Nightcrawler
February 12, 2007, 01:22 PM
Correia and Nightcrawler!!

*BLUSH*

Thank you. I do try to keep my gunfights grounded in reality. Writing a gunfight is tough; on one hand, you want to include enough detail that it's not glossed over. On the other, you want to keep the pacing fast and intense.

You will, of course, find my personal bias in my writings. I mean, a badguy hit with a .308 soft point will require a second shot far less often than will a badguy hit with a 5.56mm ball in my stories. (But it has happened. Nothing is a death ray.)

I always keep track of my round count, though. Guns have to be reloaded. Also, notice that the guns never "jam" requiring the hero to go hand-to-hand. There are some novels where that happens so often that the hero really needs to get his weapons fixed.

MikePGS
February 12, 2007, 01:24 PM
I think John Sandford does a pretty decent job in regards to guns. He mentions them accurately but doesen't really dwell on them. Also in his book Rules Of Prey theres a scene in which the main character makes a silencer and actually screws it up at one point, i'm not sure how accurate it is but it seems pretty realistic to me.

kentucky_smith
February 12, 2007, 01:39 PM
No one's mentioned Tom Clancy. Haven't seen too many mistakes, very detailed. Aside from the flipping the car by shooting the tire out in Rainbow Six.

Geronimo45
February 12, 2007, 01:57 PM
Frederic Forsythe - Day of the Jackal, Dogs of War, The Odessa File. May not have been a gun guy (not sure about it), but he definitely did his research.

Only firearms mixup I ever read was a PPK firing 9mm parabellum in the Odessa File (since the Euro-folks call .380 9mm Browning or 9mm Kurz, no real surprise that the two would be confused to a non-gunny).

Dogs of War is pretty gun heavy - a lot of detail on how a group of men could manage to get some old German SMGs, ammo, bazooka, and mortars out of non-gun-friendly Europe. Very interesting stuff.

ProficientRifleman
February 12, 2007, 02:12 PM
John Ross is one of the best.

Next I would name Bill Branon, who wrote Let Us Prey, and, Devil's Hole. Both of which are excellent shooters' books.

Read 'em and enjoy.

Fat_46
February 12, 2007, 02:34 PM
Richard North Patterson - on of the most overtly anti-gun authors I have ever had the displeasure of reading. Here's a link to an interview with him: http://www.bookreporter.com/authors/au-patterson-richard.asp

ddc
February 12, 2007, 02:42 PM
thumbs up: Andy McNab
thumbs down: Robert Ludlum

pax
February 12, 2007, 02:47 PM
Thumbs up to Dean Koontz. He knows what he's talking about.

pax

tomhorn
February 12, 2007, 02:50 PM
boomer is on the money with david Morrell Have you read night of the ranger , harold coyle team Yankee has to be the best book i have ever read .He also wrote one about bosnia all the children great book ,lousey ones are the ones who do no research...I read one while in Kotzebue Ak about tankers great book he is a major in the army ..

tomhorn
February 12, 2007, 02:53 PM
Has anyone read anything by Peter Capstick he was a P/H in africa great reads you cant put them down ..I know its off the subject:)

dcloudy777@aol.com
February 12, 2007, 02:53 PM
One thing I've noticed about Stephen Hunter is that he has seemed to learn more and/or do more research regarding firearms as his career has progressed. Point of Impact has some gun stuff that wasn't so hot, but his later books seemed to be much more accurate concerning guns.

DanO

bender
February 12, 2007, 02:57 PM
Is that for real about Ludlum ?? Dang, I was a big Ludlum reader as a teenager back in the 1970s. Haven't read anything by him since the early 80s I guess...

boomer1911a1
February 12, 2007, 03:02 PM
Just so's we don't get confused.

PAX: Which D. Koonts titles? I've read a few and he impressed me by not making any egregious errors, but I haven't read anything really gun-heavy. Whaddaya got? (BTW, interesting website)

pax
February 12, 2007, 03:08 PM
boomer ~

Try Dark Rivers of the Heart.

(And thanks for the kind word.) :)


pax

Terence
February 12, 2007, 03:13 PM
There's an author named Lee Child who writes a series about a guy named Jack Reacher. Reacher spends a lot of time carrying large amounts of lethal hardware around and doing really amazing things with it.

The treatment of guns ranges from the impossible (Reacher cocks guns with no external hammer) to the improbable (discovers a .50 Desert Eagle that a small town Georgia detective kept as a service weapon), but the stories are great. And sometimes he even gets it right.

I posted on the Lee Child forum asking why Reacher was doing so many odd things with a H&K P7M10. Overall, most of the other readers, including one guy who claimed to be a former Major in the MPs, told me not to worry about the little details and enjoy the story.

TX1911fan
February 12, 2007, 03:15 PM
John Sandford is not too bad, but he makes some pretty petty mistakes. Everything is a clip. People flying backwards when hit with a .45 slug. That sort of stuff. I just listened to one of his books and swear there were more. Nothing overt, just Hollywood.

ARKIESTEEL
February 12, 2007, 03:31 PM
That dude that is doing the zombie story on here is doing a great job with his use of guns and terms. Plus the story is realy good

boomer1911a1
February 12, 2007, 03:33 PM
I almost forgot Don Pendleton. He created the Executioner series back in the early '70s. I read them when I was a kid, but he seemed both gun heavy and gun savvy. May have to revisit those. At least the early ones, before the series turned into a franchise.

Trevanian (The Eiger Sanction, The Loo Sanction, Incident at Twenty-Mile) wasn't bad.

Neal Stephenson is also sheer greatness. In addition to his intriguing fictional guns (like Reason, a portable electric Gatling gun that fires 3mm depleted Uranium splinters (Snowcrash,) and the Skull Gun from The Diamond Age) his historical weapons reporting rings true as well. Check out Cryptonomocon; it's a near-religious experience. Not so his latest work, but no one's perfect.

ddc
February 12, 2007, 04:14 PM
I have read most of the Jack Reacher novels by Lee Child and have enjoyed them but as has been pointed out his gun IQ isn't as high as you would hope.

Another author that seems to know his way around is Marcus Wynne. His characters seem to have a fondness for Karl Sokol customized HiPowers.

From "No Other Option":

What kind of shooter you packing there, son?
Dale grinned, Browning High-Power.
Who makes your leather?
Greg Kramer. Wear a lot of Sparks, too.
Young, good looking , and he's got good taste in gun leather.

mec
February 12, 2007, 04:33 PM
"Thumbs up to Dean Koontz. He knows what he's talking about."

Right. He bobbles occasionally but you can tell he does his homework.

A pseudonym named Phillip Atlee wrote the Joe Gault books. Really knew his stuff like Donald Hamilton.

Ian Flemming was born too soon. He could have been king of Internet! Experts!
He was the foremost authority on cigarettes, booze, cars and everything else. Somebody taught him how to shoot a Sten gun once and he became such a firearms expert that he put safety catches on revolvers, dreamed up gun-caliber combinations that never existed and thought the .32 PPK had awesome power. He hated guns, gun nuts and marital fidelity.

Steven King likes to come up with Colt Woodsmans (men?) in .38 caliber and seems confused about autos and revolvers. He's had time to study the situation but he ain't gonna do it.

John D. McDonald serialized some of his later Travis McGee novels for, of all things, Cosmopolitan. They asked him to include some anti-gun dialectic and he did so. " Only a trained soldier, policeman or psychopath can use a gun to defend himself ( or something like that) and, "... I'm gradually turning off of handguns.." His fat-fword running buddy, Meyer was a Keynesian economist which is to say he was a socialist.
One publisher tried to get Heinlein to do the same thing and he laughed his face.
That was probably about the time he came up with Longcourt Phiyllis.

jondar
February 12, 2007, 05:04 PM
I think Zane Grey tried hard to get it right in his Western novels but kind of fell short. I've tried to read two or three of his novels but put them aside, not anything real bad relating to guns but just trite. Zane and his entourage visited Elmer Keith, I think in Idaho, gathering background on firearms to be used in the novels. All of them had lever action rifles and were stupefied at Elmer's long range hits on targets with his .44 Specials that they couldn't hit with their rifles.

Elmer said Zane Grey used some of this long range handgun shooting in his novel "Thunder Mountain." I haven't read it so don't know for sure.

Mr White
February 12, 2007, 05:25 PM
Not exactly fiction but Stephen Ambrose is one of my favorites.

As for true fiction, lately I've been reading a lot of W.E.B. Griffin. His books usually have you scratching your head for the first hundred pages because he's great at taking 3 or 4 seemingly unrelated subplots and weaving them into a great story that comes together beautifully in the last 50 pages. I searched thru this thread and didn't see Griffin (www.webgriffin.com) mentioned once. Can't believe no one here mentioned him.

Correia
February 12, 2007, 06:58 PM
I hear this guy knows that the bullets come out the pointy end.

http://www.thehighroad.org/attachment.php?attachmentid=52415&d=1170390733

Should be available for sale in about two months.

Biker
February 12, 2007, 07:01 PM
I like that patch! I could even put one on my cutt-off seein's how I've been married 5 times.

Who did the photography?

Biker:cool:

dmftoy1
February 12, 2007, 07:23 PM
I like Vince Flynn on the "good" side of the equation ..

Dale Brown on the bad side ..the chapter I was reading last night had the guy pull out his 12 gauge shotgun and then referred to it as a small caliber rifle for the next 3 paragraphs . . . :(

xilch
February 12, 2007, 07:41 PM
What about Louis L'Amour? I used to read a lot of his books when I was younger. I wasn't much of a gunner back then, but I don't remember a lot of problems, but to be honest, my memory of the gun play in his books is a bit fuzzy now days. Most of it seemed to be pretty typical "Western" type gun play. Like a Lee Van Cleef/Clint Eastwood movie.

usmccpl
February 12, 2007, 08:06 PM
Well since I couldnt say it first I will just have to agree that Ludlum dont know anything about weapons of any sort. And for favorite Ill go with Peter Hathaway Capstick.

Starter52
February 12, 2007, 08:19 PM
Thumbs up to Harry Turtledove. He does an excellent job in getting things correct.

jojosdad
February 12, 2007, 08:41 PM
L Neil Smith, author of The Probability Broach, IMHO the best piece of alternative history to appear in the last 20 years. Mr. Smith is a Life member of the NRA and shoots NRA Hunters Pistol, according to the blurb on the dust jacket. The book concerns a libertarian society where everyone is armed, and has some great quotes about it. The hero is a Denver PD Lt. who carries a 41 mag (either a 56 or 57) and has a single shot derringer in 41 as a BUG :what:
"Armed people are free. No state can control those who have the machinery and the will to resist, no mob can take their liberty and property. And no 220-pound thug can threaten the well being or dignity of a 110-pound woman who has 2 pounds of iron to even things out. Is that evil? Is that wrong?
People who object to weapons aren't abolishing violence, they're begging for rule by brute force, when the biggest, strongest animals among men were always automatically 'right'. Guns ended that, and social democracy is a hollow farce without an armed populace to make it work".

Here's a link to the book: http://www.amazon.com/Probability-Broach-L-Neil-Smith/dp/0765301539/sr=8-1/qid=1171329650/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-8864152-6021665?ie=UTF8&s=books
and here's one to the graphic novel http://bigheadpress.com/tpbtgn?page=0

bass806
February 12, 2007, 09:00 PM
I can't believe the thread made it this far without mentioning one of our own-Stephen A. Camp. Paid in Full is on of the best "gun enthusiast" books I've read. And it has a plot!!!

X Who
February 12, 2007, 09:27 PM
I almost forgot Don Pendleton. He created the Executioner series back in the early '70s. I read them when I was a kid, but he seemed both gun heavy and gun savvy. May have to revisit those. At least the early ones, before the series turned into a franchise.

I quit reading the series, which wasn't that gun savvy, when Mack Bolan, the hero, was using a Marlin lever action in 444 Marlin for long range.

Gun descriptions were OK, but usage didn't fit. Prepare to suspend all scepticism when reading the books. I was college age when I read those (I think), and I doubt that I could stand to read them now.

Detachment Charlie
February 12, 2007, 09:46 PM
Coyle and Sanford are top shelf.

Geronimo .45 noted that Frederick Forsythe did an especially fine job and that "Dogs of War" stood out. It should stand out; Forsythe is "the real deal." I was fascinated by Dogs of War, he just knew too much about some things most people know nothing. I did a lot of digging. Dogs of War is the story of an attempted coup of an African country. The story is true; Forsythe, himself, put the coup together and lead the raid. The coup failed.:what:

mec
February 12, 2007, 09:52 PM
Wilbur Smith writes historical novels about south africa and rhodesia/zimbabwe. He knows his guns very well.

Dienekes
February 12, 2007, 10:49 PM
Always liked Donald Hamilton. He was a thinking man's writer. If Jeff Cooper had written thrillers they would have come out much like Hamilton's.

The Matt Helm movies were just plain awful; but to tell the truth I forget about the eye candy after all this time. Maybe they were enough to salvage something. I just hope Hamilton was paid a bundle for the hack job done with his novels.

Razor
February 12, 2007, 11:02 PM
Thumbs up to Harry Turtledove. He does an excellent job in getting things correct.

You're kidding, right? Heck, in one of his books he had the Confederates running around with AK-47s during the Civil War!!! :scrutiny:

:neener:

Seriously, The Guns of the South is one of my favorite books.


It's been a looong time since I've read any of them, but I recall that Richard Austin's The Guardians series to be pretty gun savvy.

ddc
February 12, 2007, 11:07 PM
+1 for "The Guns of the South". Great read.

XD Fan
February 13, 2007, 12:41 AM
What about Louis L'Amour?

I used to read his books a lot as a kid. A lot of his gunfights were movie grade western stuff, but his work was the first place I learned of the Spencer repeating rifles that loaded a magazine tube through the butt of the gun. I also remmeber him to be partial to the Smith and Wesson .44 Russian. I remember him saying that it was an exceptionally accurate weapon.

One oddity that I remember from Silver Canyon (I think!) was the main character's Irish side-kick. He was a gun smith and had taken a .75 horse pistol and converted it into a cartridge firing four shot revolver (He had to hand load, of course.). As I recall the cylinder had to be rotated by hand. L'Amour said all it need to be an admirable peice of artillery was wheels. I always wondered if that was possible.

arthurcw
February 13, 2007, 01:03 AM
correia wrote:
Should be available for sale in about two months.

#1) keep us posted.

#2) please tell me the patches are going to be for sale!

crashm1
February 13, 2007, 01:12 AM
Barry Eisler is good. Micheal Crow writes some pretty good stuff. For a good blend of sci fi/noir Richard K Morgan is great (Altered Carbon is the first book). Andrew Vaschs has the best anti hero going in Burke. Stephen Hunter is obsessively detailed about the details but I'm not a big fan of his characters so far. I really like Robert B. Parker and Lee Childs but there is a certain amount of goofiness gun wise. Ludlum does indeed suck. Dogs of War was great everytime I've read it as was a book I think was called Five Fingers that I have since lost.

Hutch
February 13, 2007, 08:14 AM
3 major problems w/ W. E. B. Griffin.

1) Too many initials.

2) Takes too long to publish new books.

3) Sometimes refers to Smith and Wesson "Detective Specials". I mean, c'mon. Really.

JFrame
February 13, 2007, 09:15 AM
I dunno about Dean Koontz. From what I recall, he had every other character blazing away with six shots from their .38 Chief's Specials...

There was also that incredible faux pas in LIGHTNING where he had a character toting an Uzi with a 400 round magazine. That bit was later chalked up to a typo -- but again, based on my recollection, the number of rounds was spelled out in the text (not numerical). It kind'a shattered the "suspension of disbelief" of an otherwise excellent read... I'm guessing that later editions were amended. ;)

Dirty Bob
February 13, 2007, 09:47 AM
Let's not forget our own "Travis McGee" (Matthew Bracken). His gun scenes held together very well.

-----------

I've gotta respectfully disagree about The Five Fingers, by "Gayle Rivers." It's presented as slightly-changed fact, but I didn't believe it. It seems that I'm unusual, though: I've had more than one person tell me it's their all-time favorite book. That book, though, has been surrounded by controversy since it came out (prompting more folks to read it, I'm sure), which is probably why the author claimed it was fact.

It's very entertaining and "feels" like it's full of real facts, but I remember one character carrying a reloading set for his shotgun! I pictured him scrambling around on the jungle floor right after a firefight, looking for his 12ga. hulls under the various plants. There were other things, like the characters wearing berets in the jungle, rather than more practical headgear.

Actually, if it had been put forth as pure fiction, I would've enjoyed it a lot more!

Regards,
Dirty Bob

mrb302
February 13, 2007, 09:52 AM
+1 Matthew Bracken

I can't believe it took this long for his name to come up.

Also, John Ross.

marley
February 13, 2007, 10:53 AM
I agree that Sanford , koontz and Hunter are good. Not mentioned is nelson demille. Patrick

ialevy
February 13, 2007, 11:34 AM
+1 on David Morrell

David is actually a freind of myself and my family.

He does exceptional research for his writing.

i.e. extreme survival courses, tactical driving courses, met with emerson about featuring a CQC-7 in a book. He tends to leave out some crucial steps in certain things, so he does not write directions to make explosives, etc.

He prefers SIGs BTW....

Dirty Bob
February 13, 2007, 01:01 PM
I should also add Dean Ing. He researches before he writes! What a concept!

Not a lot of gun stuff in Ing's books, in general, but they're presented realistically, except for his science fiction "chillers" in Single Combat and Wild Country, which were gov't-issue 7mm caseless pistols with smart gun technology.

I especially enjoyed the end of Blood of Eagles, in which the protagonist -- armed with a scarred, battered, WWII-vintage scoped .303 Enfield -- goes up against a bad guy armed with a Galil in the Sierras.

Regards,
Dirty Bob

StealthyBlagga
February 13, 2007, 01:08 PM
The article below was written by the real "Q" - Geoffrey Boothroyd. As you will see, James Bond would have been hopelessly underarmed if it were not for Boothroyd's intervention:

http://img232.imageshack.us/img232/5656/armourerto007p1nb9.jpg

http://img232.imageshack.us/img232/1971/armourerto007p2dn9.jpg

http://img66.imageshack.us/img66/60/armourerto007p3su8.jpg

http://img66.imageshack.us/img66/6787/armourerto007p4me2.jpg

http://img100.imageshack.us/img100/6811/armourerto007p5ir0.jpg

http://img100.imageshack.us/img100/8383/armourerto007p6bp8.jpg

Ed
February 13, 2007, 01:27 PM
Vince Flynn. His Website even has a link to FN

psychophipps
February 13, 2007, 07:26 PM
Vince Flynn isn't bad but his latest book discussed sub-sonic 9mm pistol ammo as being woefully underpowered in great detail. The bullet can't break the sound barrier for effective suppression so it has to have less powder, blah, blah, blah.

Ever hear of 147-gr 9mm ammo, buddy? :rolleyes:
Mark(psycho)Phipps( HAHAHA! )

Hypnogator
February 13, 2007, 07:59 PM
Thumbs up to Harry Turtledove. He does an excellent job in getting things correct.
Actually, that he's a she! She consulted with me on line years ago about guns in one of her books, IIRC.

Alistair MacLean was somewhat of a nimrod about guns. He starts When Eight Bells Toll with a riveting description of a Peacemaker Colt, then ruins it by talking about "it's semi-automatic action." :uhoh:

Agree that Ian Fleming was also way out there. His considering the 7.65mm Browning (.32 ACP) as being a "real stopper" and a 2" .38 Special as an anti-vehicle weapon have already been commented on. But what about James Bond carrying his famous Walther PPK in a Berns-Martin Triple-Draw shoulder holster. That holster uses spring pressure to grip the cylinder of a revolver -- it cannot be used for an autoloader! :eek: :uhoh:

JesseL
February 13, 2007, 08:08 PM
Actually, that he's a she!

She's got a heck of a facial hair issue then. (http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/t/harry-turtledove/)

MAURICE
February 13, 2007, 08:46 PM
Stuart Woods does pretty well in some of the Stone Barrington novels.
James Patterson is another that will put a safety on wheelguns or call a Glock a service revolver.

Ed
February 13, 2007, 08:54 PM
I did notice that part about 9mm subsonic. He said it wouldn't go through the drywall unlike a 45 which was too powerful.

aryfrosty
February 13, 2007, 09:03 PM
One of the best I have encountered to date is John Ringo. His knowlege of military weaponry is spot on. He has been doing Sci-Fi but his recent books are more contemporary.
One of the worst is Robert Parker. One reason is that I really like his books and consider it a let-down when he won't do his homework about guns. No matter if he is the baddest dog on the block...when he carries a J frame S&W and further handicaps it by only loading four rounds he just looks silly. When he has Hawk shoot a bad guy with a .25 auto hidden in a mitten...several times without jamming...he just makes his work look dumb. Easy to make a gunfight require just exactly the number of rounds the hero has in a book. In life it doesn't always work out.

Dr.Rob
February 13, 2007, 09:19 PM
Ok I like Dean Koontz, but in one of his books the good guy's wife takes her Colt 45 out of the nightstnd, clearly a 1911. A chapter later it's a Spingfield. Then its a Springfiled Pit-Bull or Champion or whatever, almost like he wasn't satisfied describing it the first time. There's a way too long exchange between her and the professional killer about the single action trigger of this polymorphing handgun.

Otherwise, he's pretty good.

Don Pendleton liked guns a lot, I'm not sure I could tolerate his writing now, sure at 13 it was spicy stuff, chuck full of 44 Marlins an 44 Automags and Stoner LMG's, but as an adult his plots are paper thin sheets between action sequences.

I love my hardboiled fiction, Andrew Vaachs is top-notch in the modern version, though his Burke series is borderline pornographic in places. But all his writing is pretty gruff. "Two Trains Running" is an outright homage to Hammet's Red Harvest.

James Elroy. Love him or hate him, LA Confindential is chock full of period firearms, brass knucks, switchblades and saps.

Raymond Chandler. His delivery of the everyman dialouge makes up for any technical mistakes.

Forsythe... as someone else pointed out actually DID take part in a mercenary raid in Africa. 'Dogs of War' is a lost classic.

Clancy and many other techno thriller authors make numerous mistakes in their early works, he gets more savvy as he goes along.

Jim Thompson wrote 'The Getaway' and 'The Killer Inside me' noir classics.

Barry Eisler's "Rain" series is pretty entertaining and chock ful of gun fu kung fu and every fu ever made.

PS I LIKED "Five Fingers" and "Incident at Twenty Mile"

Larry Correia's MHI is popcorn fueled romp of gunsmoke and goo that will put a smile on the face of any gunny worth their reloads. seriously, it's a FUN read.

geim druth
February 13, 2007, 10:07 PM
Anything by H. Beam Piper is worth reading.

One of Barry Sadler's Casca stories was set in the Eastern Front during WWII another was about Dien Bien Phu. As you'd imagine, both were good for gun stuff.

I read Robert Ruark's 'Uhuru' years ago, and remember it being good.

Not fiction, but lots of good reading here, http://manybooks.net/authors/bakersam.html

Correia
February 13, 2007, 10:30 PM
Larry Correia's MHI is popcorn fueled romp of gunsmoke and goo that will put a smile on the face of any gunny worth their reloads. seriously, it's a FUN read.

Thank you. :D

aryfrosty
February 13, 2007, 10:40 PM
To the member who wrote about Piper. I agree with that completely. I just bought the last book written by him, "Lord Kalvan of Otherwhen". His tech details are really well thought out.

loxety
February 14, 2007, 12:26 AM
Boston T. Party aka Kennith Royce :)

Oleg Volk
February 14, 2007, 12:57 AM
Who did the photography?

I did.

crashm1
February 14, 2007, 01:32 AM
Is there anyway to get MHI out earlier because having to read about other people reading it AND liking it immensely is starting to get annoying to a guy who goes through books way too fast to wait for the paperback. I forgot about Ringo actually Michael Z. Williamson (Mad Mike to us) is pretty good too but I am having a hard time finding his books around here at the evil franchises.

Correia
February 14, 2007, 09:49 AM
Sorry Crash, doing what I can man. :D Book is done, but it takes time to get it out there.

tinygnat219
February 14, 2007, 12:00 PM
Best:

Eric Flint: With his 1632 series, there is a small West VA mining town circa 2000 that gets sucked into the 30 years' war in 1630s Germany. The 2nd Amendment is highly touted, and Eric Flint has an entire section of a chat room devoted to reconstructing the firearms industry. Check it out: www.1632.org, www.baen.com. The book is also available for free download.

Joel Rosenberg: With his Guardians of the Flame series, brings 6 or so college kids into the world they were playing their games in (think Dungeons and Dragons and they are their characters). One of the students is an Engineering major and makes Black Powder for the first time, and literally starts the firearms industry from scratch. Less technical details here in this series, but Joel Rosenberg is also the author of Everything You Need to Know About (Legally) Carrying a Handgun In Minnesota and is an A.A.C.F.I and N.R.A certified firearms instructor.

Just two that I like to talk about.

Worst: anything from Oprah's list, and Rosie O'Donnell

Lupinus
February 14, 2007, 12:23 PM
Correia please tell me those patches are going on sale too, every range bag will need one.

Correia
February 14, 2007, 12:38 PM
Yep. I'm a self promoting son of a gun. :)

Lupinus
February 14, 2007, 12:52 PM
so uh, where do we pre order our books and patches :)

Correia
February 14, 2007, 12:54 PM
I was all set to send everything in for self publication, but I was contacted yesterday by a big dog publisher, so now I'm awaiting their verdict. (yep, they contacted me, special thanks to those of you that "know people"). If I get the nay there, then it is back to the self publication.

Lupinus
February 14, 2007, 01:05 PM
I vote for a patch included in every first edition purchase :neener:

Travis McGee
February 14, 2007, 06:04 PM
Two really terrific novelists who are are dead bang on guns:

Gerald Seymour, a Brit. He writes about the IRA, SAS etc, as well as other dirty war and limited war topics that are more recent. He's in every library, check him out if you really want some good realistic thriller reading. Start with his older stuff.

Robert Ruark, another Brit, who was a "white hunter" in Africa in the 50s and 60s. His classic works "Something of Value" and "Uhuru" are just incredible. Best gun writing EVER. He is credited with coining the phrase, "use enough gun," which is the title of one of his non-fiction hunting books. His novels are about the "Mau Mau uprising" in Kenya in the 50s, and the independence of Kenya in the 60s. Great thrillers, very realistic, and gun saturated.

Ruark's books are also in every library. Don't miss them!

ClarkEMyers
February 14, 2007, 06:32 PM
Robert Ruark was neither a Brit nor a PWH - though a fine writer who went down hill later in his personal life.

His memoirs of growing on and around the American South(The Old Man and the Boy and The Old Man's Boy Grows Older) are also cleaned up and dressed up to make a nicer life than he really had in a fairly rough and very poor childhood. Ruark started as a newspaper man - Grenadine Etchings his first collection has some collector value. The story goes that he went to the scenes of his, impoverished, childhood in a Rolls Royce which inspired one woman to ask "if Bob is such a successful writer why is he driving an old Packard?"

MudPuppy
February 14, 2007, 07:34 PM
Correia, man, that's inspirational.

(I've re-lit the fire to wrap up Poison Summer.)


I'll be buying a copy (and patches) when available!


Lights Out ever make it between covers? Another book I loved was Red Army by Ralph Peters--but haven't liked anything else of his. He doesn't go into the gun/weapon details though, but still manages to capture the "being there" element, imho.

Travis McGee
February 14, 2007, 10:14 PM
I stand corrected about Ruark's origins! When I read about him, it listed his residence as England, and I assumed he was a Brit because of his deft handling of the "Colonials" in Kenya.

ithacalover
February 15, 2007, 06:59 PM
Stephen King is the worst - he can't get even the simplest things right. There are characters pumping double barrelled shotguns, carrying .38 special automatics, etc, etc.
Dean Koontz is the best however - the detail and accuracy in his character's weapons is uncanny.

Orthonym
February 16, 2007, 12:11 AM
*SERIOUS* gun nut, collector, etc. Read "Lord Kalvan of Otherwhen".

All of his novels and stories had all of the characters well-armed, either with firearms or ray-guns, and he always got the details right with the firearms. He understood the splatter, too, so when he offed himself, he put down drop cloths, and turned off the utilities. Some think he believed so strongly in re-incarnation that he thought suicide was just pushing the reset button.

Orthonym
February 16, 2007, 12:23 AM
I think Greg Bear married Poul Anderson's daughter. They had a daughter, whose name is Rylla, I believe.

(Rylla is the princess who is Calvin Morrison's sweety in the Piper novel)

Orthonym
February 16, 2007, 02:42 AM
http://www.thedonovan.com/cgi-bin/mt/mt-comments.cgi?entry_id=3679

I'm Justthisguy in those silly comments, there.

Lotsa inside jokes, there, but some study will have y'all understanding it, I think.

Umm, lotsa studyin', at The Donovans' site. Go study there; it'll do ya good.

Moondancer
February 17, 2007, 10:58 PM
About Koontz, IIRC, he made a fair amount of blunders early on in his career, but it's been so long ago that I'm not positive. I just remember thinking "that's not right!" when I was reading some of his stuff.

Stephen King - really poor firearms knowledge. That's really too bad, because he's one of my favorite authors (especially his earlier works... 'Salem's Lot, The Stand, IT (one of the best novels ever written as far as I'm concerned). It seems to me that he's lost it around the time he published Gerald's Game).

I agree with posters about Hunter and Sanford: much better than average. I REALLY like Stephen Hunters Pale Horse Coming with all the barely disguised old-time gunnies in it. FWIW, the early part of the novel seemed to go on forever until Earl finally escaped and it began to grab my attention.

Ahern: obviously a gun person. The Survivalist series was good; the (too short) Takers series was better from a plot standpoint. He went into a lot of weapon detail. Books were a quick read (and in retrospect not as good as I thought originally. I bought the first five of The Survivalist through an on-line used bookstore about a year ago and enjoyed them, but not to the extent I remembered. In fact, I quit about 1/2 way through the fifth one.) Of course, he now owns/runs the New Detonics... so I gotta give him credit for that.

John Ringo: top-notch. I haven't seen any mistakes yet in the Ghost series. I just recently read the published books and notwithstanding the sex in the first one (which really didn't bother me) they are pretty good.

John Ross and Matthew Bracken: perfect score IMHO. But... they're part of us, so they should be. :D

Don Pendleton - read the Executioner back in the 70s when they came out. I really liked the gun stuff, but didn't know as much as I know now.

cyberhh
February 19, 2007, 01:26 AM
My favorite pulp author: William Johnstone (Ashes series) - writes post WW3 pulp with a great idea for laws. No idea if his firearm knowledge is any good as it has been a long time since I read it.

William Diehl - again no idea on the accuracy of his firearm use, but a great author.

Eric Lustbader - more entertainment - again, no idea on the gun tech.

If anyone has read any of these and can help me out on the tech I would appreciate it.

Thanks

clutch
May 27, 2011, 07:28 PM
Heck, I'm reading the first of the Mitch Rapp series and the bad guys use plastique and primacord and then there is a line following that where 'A cloud of cordite filled the air'.

I suspect Vince gets better over time but that was a bit disappointing. Reading this thread caused me to order the first book in the Rapp series for my Kindle.

Clutch

Red Cent
May 27, 2011, 07:59 PM
Richard Marcinko

Full of himself but decent reading.

Red Cent
May 27, 2011, 08:01 PM
Who was the author with the hero who carries a Detonics under each armpit? SHTF type stuff.

Red Cent
May 27, 2011, 08:04 PM
Read all of Sanford's books.

sm
May 27, 2011, 09:00 PM
James Lee Burke.

I may have overlooked seeing his name mentioned in previous posts.

Dirty Bob
May 27, 2011, 09:25 PM
Who was the author with the hero who carries a Detonics under each armpit? SHTF type stuff.
That's Jerry Ahern, a gun writer and author of the series The Survivalist, with protagonist John Thomas Rourke. JTR seemed to mirror a lot of Ahern's preferences, including an affection for Detonics .45 pistols, the Colt Python, and the A.G. Russell Sting 1A.

Regards,
Dirty Bob

Carter
May 27, 2011, 11:15 PM
Rob Thurman, which is actually the pen name for a female author.

She writes really good books (IMHO), but her main character some how manages to conceal a desert eagle and a glock in a shoulder holster. Plus, for some reason the main character has to manually chamber a round in the eagle after firing a shot, but thats only when the author is trying to add a little "cool" factor.

Other than those oddities the books are really good.

Jim Butcher has a fare amount of guns in his books but the main character knows very little about them so there aren't too many mistakes from what I remember since it never gets too detailed.

Arkansas Paul
May 27, 2011, 11:30 PM
It's an old thread, but a good one to revive I think.

If you're into western books, JT Edson is spot on with guns and goes into quiet a bit of detail about them. It's what drew me to him in the first place. Everything from pocket pistols to heavy artillery in his Civil War series. It's the first place I heard of the Remington Cane gun.

Also, someone mentioned Louis Lamour earlier. It was his books that I read about the Walch 12-shot Navy revolver. That was a neat piece of hardware.

On a more modern note, William W. Johnstone's Ashes series talks a lot about guns and is fairly accurate. They were out of print for a while but the series is being published again. I heard somewhere that Johnstone died. That's too bad. I enjoy his books.

Apocalypse-Now
May 28, 2011, 04:48 AM
i read a few of stephen king's "the gunslinger" series, and he doesn't know jack squat about guns lol

TexasBill
May 29, 2011, 03:32 AM
My favorite pet peeve is Rex Stout, the author of the Nero Wolfe detective stories. Archie Goodwin, Stout's assistant and a private eye, carries a Colt . 28 revolver with a safety. Of course, Wolfe's personal car was a Heron, which didn't exist, either.

I liked Travis McGee, right up until the end, when he decided guns were bad. Not sure what happened to John D. McDonald, but I was disappointed.

I also dislike it when authors have their heroes make a big deal about disliking guns even though they carry and use them. That seems a bit dishonest to me. After all, if something saved my bacon time and again, I think I would be pretty fond of it.

Johannes_Paulsen
May 29, 2011, 09:40 AM
Stieg Larsson, author of The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo and its sequels, clearly didn't do enough research on the subject of guns...at one point, he refers to something like a Colt 45 Magnum. Books are otherwise a good read, though.

Joe Demko
May 29, 2011, 10:03 AM
Mickey Spillane always disappointed me with the errors he made about guns. For some reason it seemed like he should know better. The last Mike Hammer novel has mountains of errors regarding Mike's trademark .45.

statelineblues
May 29, 2011, 10:32 AM
Good thread to renew, especially at the start of summer reading time...

Of course, a tip o' the hat to our own Larry Correia (Monster Hunter International, Monster Hunter Vendetta, The Grimnoir Chronicles: Hard Magic)! All are excellent reads and very accurate (but, dang, these guys seem to lose ALOT of guns throughout the books :eek:)

H. Beam Piper is my favorite author, altho all his books are out of print at the moment.

I liked Roland Green's books, but haven't seen anything from him in years...

Laurel K Hamilton's early work in her "Anita Blake - Vampire Hunter" series. The heroine carrys a Firestar! Kind of suspense/vampire/romance novels. First two or three books were ok, but avoid the later books.

Specs
May 29, 2011, 11:01 AM
BAD Robert W. Walker writes about his Detective hero/ Indian good guy chasing coyotes off his ranch with a "22 smooth bore"

Red Cent
May 29, 2011, 02:55 PM
Specs, they make smoothbore 22s.

pikid89
May 29, 2011, 03:07 PM
(but, dang, these guys seem to lose ALOT of guns throughout the books )
whats wrong with that...i love looking for a new gun :D

harrygunner
May 29, 2011, 05:12 PM
I like Chuck Logan along with Vince Flynn, Lee Child, Sandford, etc.

Gregg Hurwitz has books that include guns I like. (But avoid "Trust No One" has a ridiculous plot.) One mistake, his main character carries a .357 Mag snub nose as his main carry, which is fine. But on a raid on an outlaw motorcycle gang, the writer had him add a Sig 226 in an ankle holster as backup. Good luck with that.

Ludlum wrote 100 page books then turned them into 400 page books by repeating things over and over and over ... Terrible.

I started a Brad Thor book, but the plot started with the "hero" shooting at a bad guy while sitting in the window of a fast moving car in the middle of a typhoon. That was too unrealistic for me to want to continue reading.

SundownRider
May 29, 2011, 05:23 PM
I liked White Flag of the Dead. The author does a great job of putting in a number of guns and he writes like he knows what he's talking about.


I should mention I'm the author!!

JN01
May 29, 2011, 05:30 PM
Michael Koryta. His latest novels have more of a supernatural bent and less gunplay, but his novels featuring PI Lincoln Perry are very good gun wise. Besides that, it's great writing that is hard to put down.

xfyrfiter
May 29, 2011, 06:08 PM
I have always liked the Louis Lamour books, he actually had been in the locations he wrote about, and his historical research was first rate. When he mentions a gun it was accurate to the time period he was writing about.

writerinmo
May 29, 2011, 08:09 PM
This is why my characters use magic or swords...

GCBurner
May 29, 2011, 09:26 PM
Murder In The Gunroom is available as a free ebook download, and well worth the read. :)
http://www.manybooks.net/titles/piperh1786617866-8.html

MDH90
May 29, 2011, 09:45 PM
I've always enjoyed the works of Brad Thor and he has been pretty accurate, though in one of his books his hero Scot Harvath was having a lul in the action and taking stock in his supplies, he was almost out of ammo for his MP5 but had several magazines for his Glock 19 (or other 9mm Glock).

(edit for typo)

statelineblues
May 29, 2011, 09:53 PM
Originally posted by GCBurner:

"Murder In The Gunroom" by H. Beam Piper

Murder In The Gunroom is available as a free ebook download, and well worth the read.
http://www.manybooks.net/titles/piperh1786617866-8.html

Thanks! I've been looking for this book for years!

Jim Watson
May 29, 2011, 10:09 PM
I was reading 'Fuzzy Nation' which is John Scalzi's rehash of 'Little Fuzzy.'
Kind of like all the movie remakes, up through True Grit.

OK yarn considered in isolation, but Piper's Jack Holoway would never be found unarmed as Scalzi's mutation normally is. And what's this "Zararaptor" stuff? Where is the Zarathustran Damnthing? And the Harpy?
This was NOT a book that needed writing. Scalzi isn't bad, but he is no Beam Piper.

Specs
May 30, 2011, 07:23 AM
Smooth bore 22? I never heard of it.

prickett
May 30, 2011, 09:40 AM
There's an author named Lee Child who writes a series about a guy named Jack Reacher. Reacher spends a lot of time carrying large amounts of lethal hardware around and doing really amazing things with it.

The treatment of guns ranges from the impossible (Reacher cocks guns with no external hammer) to the improbable (discovers a .50 Desert Eagle that a small town Georgia detective kept as a service weapon), but the stories are great. And sometimes he even gets it right.

I posted on the Lee Child forum asking why Reacher was doing so many odd things with a H&K P7M10. Overall, most of the other readers, including one guy who claimed to be a former Major in the MPs, told me not to worry about the little details and enjoy the story.
Lee Childs writes good books, but is clueless about guns.

In one, he gets intentionally shot in the chest with a .38 because he knows they are low powered.

In another, he allows someone to draw a Beretta (?) on him and pull the trigger because he knew the owner kept the mags loaded for several years and knew it wouldn't feed because of that <grimace>

hanno
May 30, 2011, 10:01 AM
C.J. Box with the Joe Pickett series.

Great series - Box gets the guns right and has been a great promoter of Freedom Firearms.

GCBurner
May 30, 2011, 10:35 AM
Smooth bore 22? I never heard of it.
They are made for use with .22 shot cartridges. Remington and Winchester have both made them.

shootingthebreeze
May 30, 2011, 11:31 AM
http://www.authorhouse.com/Bookstore/BookDetail.aspx?BookId=SKU-000250224

When I wrote my above novel (under a pen name) I took extreme pains to be accurate with weapon systems to include individual weapons soldiers carried in the field.
Good fiction must be backed with fact. I took extreme research measures relating to nuclear countermeasures and invented some based on fact. Some people told me they could not see the difference from fact and fiction.
Facts relating to weapons are very important in a novel. If the facts are not there then the author runs the risk of having the reader put the book down, forever.
I have to agree, Tom Clancy and Frederick Forsyth are good researchers.

ArmedLiberal
May 30, 2011, 04:19 PM
Ian Fleming did pretty good.

Guns, cocktails, food, gambling, women....

All described in a vivid, memorable way.

Never did like that part about Bond getting his nads whacked with a carpet beater though.


For those who have never read the novels, they have almost nothing to do with the movies. Worth checking out.

Correia
May 30, 2011, 06:09 PM
He he he... This is an old thread. When I posted here last I'd just been contacted by my publisher for my very first book contract. I'm now working on the contract that will cover up to book #18 in 5 different series. :D

Professionally, I've developed a rep as the "gun guy" in fantasy. Sweet. I'll take it.

I'm branching out into thrillers. The online story written by Mike Kupari and I, known as Welcome Back, Mr. Nightcrawler, that was posted here a couple of years back is coming out as the thriller DEAD SIX in September. That is a very gun heavy book, (well, obviously, the rough draft was written on a gun forum).

It takes place in a small Persian Gulf nation during a violent military coup. Lots of modern guns, and we did tons of homework on the technical end of things for this one.

My Monster Hunter series is very gun heavy. Monster Hunting contractors take care of business in the most efficient way possible. Lots of modern stuff, lots of guns, and I try to keep the tactical end of things realistic enough that even my fan base won't get too nitpicky. :) Paraphrase of actual line: "What's the best gun for armored zombie bears?"

The Grimnoir Chronicles series is an alternative history, set mostly in the 1930s, so lots of period weapons. John Moses Browning is a character, and he's a wizard. (that last part isn't fictional obviously). Main character is armed with a Lewis Gun, and then a version of the BAR that never actually existed. (which is why I so love alternate history)

Next up is a sci-fi series I'm co-authoring with John Ringo. Post-apocolyptic, and there will be much gun-nuttery. We get to ask the question, "what's the best gun for giant ants?"

After that is another thriller series, a fantasy (no guns in that one!), and there will be more.

parsimonious_instead
May 30, 2011, 07:55 PM
Good:
Larry Correia (natch)
Stephen King
Robert McCammon

Bernard Cornwell's attitude toward pistols, particularly 1911s came through
in his modern day novel Wildtrack.

Single Action Six
May 31, 2011, 04:41 AM
I always liked Mickey Spillane's Mike Hammer books and T.V. shows.

Especially the sections where the females always carried a pair of 38's or 44's.. ;) and knew how to use them. :D

Single Action Six

NoirFan
May 31, 2011, 05:24 AM
i read a few of stephen king's "the gunslinger" series, and he doesn't know jack squat about guns lol

That's true, King is generally not a good gun writer. But there's a scene I love in Drawing of the Three when the main character from a post-apocalyptic world walks into a gunshop in our world and is astounded by the wealth of weapons around him. He thinks something like, "I can get 100 bullets for 50 paper dollars? Such luxury!" And then the sleazy gunshop owner immediately tries to swindle him, just like in real life. I had to laugh when I read that because it reminded me of the first time I walked into a gunshop with money in my pocket and no knowledge in my head. King is getting better at writing guns I think. Under the Dome had some realistic depictions of Ruger and Beretta pistols, and AK-47s.

Raymond Chandler is my favorite because he doesn't make a lot of errors, he doesn't dwell on unimportant details, and I learned about a lot of interesting vintage guns through his books. One of his dirty cops carries a .38 on a .44 frame, a "wicked weapon with the punch of a .45 and twice the range". I thought the description was cool without knowing what it meant, and when I learned about the real life .38-44 S&W years later it was like running into an old acquaintance.

Thomas Harris is good in the same low-key way as Chandler. Silence of the Lambs had a lot of FBI gun tidbits, like sewing washers into your jacket lining so it would swing away on the draw, and dry-firing a revolver over and over to train hand strength. The murderer uses .38 wadcutters so as not to damage his victims' carcasses. There are a lot more authentic-seeming cool little touches like that.

I thought I would like Mickey Spillane, but I can only read about a guy getting punched in the stomach, throwing up, and staring down the barrel of a .45 so many times before I kind of stop caring.

Unintended Consequences is the worst wish-fulfillment violence-porn milita fantasy masquerading as fiction I've ever had the displeasure of halfway finishing. It also had guns in it, which I suppose is all it takes for some folks.

dodge
May 31, 2011, 07:40 AM
Stephen Hunter is generally good, although the plot of Point of Impact hinged on a few rather improbable gun-related issues.

Regards,
Dirty Bob
Stephen Hunter is a fellow gun owner and in a interview that he had with Micheal Bane he stated that he talked with people that were snipers/long range shooters to get his information for the book.

Ramone
May 31, 2011, 10:17 AM
Dean Koontz, personally is actually a strong pro 2A guy. His favorite pistol seems to be the P7, and he is pretty good on details.

Stephan Hunter made two errors that jumped out at me enough to bug me- in one of the Earl Lee Swagger books, he refers to the character carrying a Thompson in the Pacific with 'a round in the chamber'- Which wouldn't work- the WW2 USMC Thompson fired from an open bolt- the firing pin was machined on the boltface.

In another novel, he has a character holding HIGH on a distant target when firing 'downhill'- he had it exactly backwards.

Overall, He does so well that those errors bugged me more than they would have from someone else. I did think the 'Bob the Nailer saving Bambi by shooting deer with delrin bullets then sawing off their antlers' bit in the begining of the first book a little silly.

farson135
May 31, 2011, 01:44 PM
Don't know if anyone has mentioned Stephen King. I like his writing but he does not know much about firearms.

I love the Dark Tower series but in the second book...well at the beginning Roland gets his bullets a little wet and virtually the entire book deals with his bullets misfiring. There are plenty of other mistakes but that is one of the biggest ones because it spans almost the entire book (and it is mentioned in the 4th).

I would also really love to know exactly how Roland reloads his revolver since it sounds impossible but if it can be done I think it would look cool.

Thomas Harris and Dean Koontz seem to know quite a bit about firearms.

Jim Watson
June 7, 2011, 10:54 PM
Strange, nobody on the net has mentioned the latest Bob The Nailer, 'Dead Zero.' Less fantastic in firearms lore than iSniper, it is a good yarn. You know how it will turn out, though. The connivers and intriguers and murderers have alienated TWO Marine snipers.

GCBurner
June 8, 2011, 12:41 AM
Libertarian scifi author L. Neil Smith likes to drop exotic weaponry into his "alternate history" stories, postulating realities where guns like the Dardick or the Mars pistols were successful and in common use.

Devonai
June 8, 2011, 01:55 AM
We're still waiting for the Abomination production model, Larry.

harrygunner
June 19, 2013, 04:35 PM
Guess most know Vince Flynn died this week.

I very much enjoyed his books. RIP

If only "Term Limits" would be made into a movie.

Frankly
June 19, 2013, 06:05 PM
Hunter has written many great books but his latest about JFK has a couple serious flaws well into the story. Just couldn't finish it.

Dr T
June 19, 2013, 06:19 PM
Any author that refers to a manual safety on an S&W revolver or a Glock semi-auto...

Carl N. Brown
June 19, 2013, 07:44 PM
I love the smell of cordite in a mystery novel, it smells like pulp fiction.


On topic: I was impressed (not overwelmed but impressed) by Dean Koontz' use of guns in Lightning--ironic that his time-traveling gestapo agents decided the Israeli Uzi was their preferred close quarters combat wepon. Not a lot of detail (the main story was more important) but none of that "flicking off the safety on his automatic revolver" stuff. What weapons details that were included were authentic.

ID-shooting
June 19, 2013, 07:51 PM
Jerry Ahern is right up at the top. The man knows his guns. Check out "The Survivalist" series.

Biker
I liked those right up to the whole sleep for 500 years and awake to Nazis, Commies, and Icelanders lol.

ID-shooting
June 19, 2013, 07:57 PM
Didnt see "Deathland" by James Axler listed. Good "get the mind off work" books.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deathlands

JFrame
June 20, 2013, 11:32 AM
I love the smell of cordite in a mystery novel, it smells like pulp fiction.


On topic: I was impressed (not overwelmed but impressed) by Dean Koontz' use of guns in Lightning--ironic that his time-traveling gestapo agents decided the Israeli Uzi was their preferred close quarters combat wepon. Not a lot of detail (the main story was more important) but none of that "flicking off the safety on his automatic revolver" stuff. What weapons details that were included were authentic.

I trust they have corrected the early edition typo in which the Uzis came with 400-round magazines... :D


.

ol' scratch
June 22, 2013, 10:04 AM
I couldn't finish The Girl Who Played With Fire by Steig Larsson because of the whole comment about the Colt .45 Magnum and the depleted uranium rounds if fired. What really made me angry was when one of the police detectives commented that it is a "big cowboy gun that no one should be able to own." I stopped reading his piece of garbage after that line, but had basically given up on it when I read about the depleted uranium tipped rounds. Anyone who had spend a sliver of time researching anything could have found out that those rounds never existed. It caused me to question the things I took him at his word for and frankly started eating my brain. :cuss::fire:

Specs
June 22, 2013, 01:28 PM
Exact same experience and reaction as I had. Once an author blows details and expresses opinions like that (even by proxy) I don't go on. Offhand I can't remember more of these errors, butI have run across many, and when I do, it ruins the book for me.

JVaughn
June 23, 2013, 07:35 AM
Stephen king seems to be pretty accurate with his gun technicals.

Hondo 60
June 23, 2013, 07:44 AM
One of my favorite authors was William W. Johnstone.

He wrote a series called "The ____ of the Mountain Man".
The blank included words like Law, War, Return, Justice etc...

I could VERY easily have seen John Wayne as the main character.
"Smoke Jensen" is da man!

As far as gun accuracy...
Well most of it is written about the 1870s - 1890s.
So there's a lot of SAAs, but at times they tend to shoot 20 rds w/o a reload.
Jensen is amazingly accurate & most of the bad guys couldn't hit the side of a barn from the inside.
And their IQs are about 50 or less.

Carl N. Brown
June 23, 2013, 09:08 AM
Steig Larsson (the author of the "Girl..." series) not so good. He could have used an advisor, as Geoffrey Boothroyd tried to advise Ian Fleming but Fleming did not always pay attention (Boothroyd recommend a S&W Centennial in Berns-Martin revolver holster, with a Walther PPK backup; Fleming had Bond carrying the PPK in the Berns-Martin).

The "Girl..." movies are much more correct.
At Internet Movie Firearms Database:
http://www.imfdb.org/wiki/Girl_with_the_Dragon_Tattoo,_The_(2009)
http://www.imfdb.org/wiki/The_Girl_Who_Played_with_Fire_(2009)
http://www.imfdb.org/wiki/Girl_Who_Kicked_the_Hornets%27_Nest,_The_(2009)

Which proves gunlore is easier to get wrong in novels, but harder to get wrong in movies when studio armories or prop houses are involved with visible objects.

I don't think Steven King is necessarily pro-gun, but the gun details in "The Stand" and in "Lisey's Story" for example ring true and the folks armed in self-defense are not all treated as redneck buffoons, which I have come to expect of mainstream fiction.

ADDED: I have tried to search my archives, but I recall reading about a novelist who believed that a revolver cylinder had to be manually rotated between shots (independent of cocking the hammer on SA or pulling the trigger on DA) and who thanked her editor for catching her faux pas before it hit the presses. I just can't find the ref just now, but propbably good on the author that I can't find it.

Trung Si
June 23, 2013, 10:35 AM
Hunter has written many great books but his latest about JFK has a couple serious flaws well into the story. Just couldn't finish it.
I liked it, I only saw one serious Flaw in it, when it comes to Hunter, he is pretty gun savvy, when I read his first Book "Shooter" I thought the Guy had been living in my House and I am not new to Guns, I have owned them and collected them since the early 60s and have been a Service Rifle Competitor for over 40 years.;)

Limey46
June 23, 2013, 10:57 AM
I write books for a living, and like many of us here I'm irritated by the ignorance and laziness of most authors when it comes to guns, so one day I got the bright idea of marketing myself as the gun doctor. Editors at publishing houses could send me their authors' manuscripts, and I'd fix all the gun mistakes they'd made. My agent just laughed. Nobody would pay for that, he said. Neither the publishers nor the authors gave a damn about "gun people" because 1) they didn't know any personally, and 2) gun people didn't read.

Trung Si
June 23, 2013, 12:08 PM
Nobody would pay for that, he said. Neither the publishers nor the authors gave a damn about "gun people" because 1) they didn't know any personally, and 2) gun people didn't read.

Get a different Agent, Yours evidently doesn't read either.:rolleyes:

Limey46
June 23, 2013, 05:46 PM
I should have written "and 2) they thought gun people didn't read." My agent knew the score.

Ryanxia
June 24, 2013, 09:53 AM
We're still waiting for the Abomination production model, Larry.
Our own Larry Correia does a great job with his Monster Hunter International series.

I started working towards turning my Saiga 12 into a rough version of Abomination but when you put the launcher on the front it makes it very heavy and that's before you even consider the bayonet. Of course I had the 20 round drum on as well so that adds to it, I guess it would help to just have the stick mags in but that's no fun. :)

Certaindeaf
June 24, 2013, 10:03 AM
The Lieutenant by L. Ron Hubbard was kinda neat. A quick read about an unending war with cobbled together weapons.

Radagast
June 24, 2013, 10:42 AM
I enjoyed The Lieutenant too, it was very good near future dystopic/ post apocalyptic Sci Fi for its time, with radiation poisoning, nuclear subs, Kevlar, etc, yet published years before the first atomic pile went critical.

I wouldn't say it was a good example of an author who both knew his guns and wrote about them to satisfy the most OCD internet gun nut. Not that there is anything wrong with OCD internet gun nuts. Having posted nearly 3000 replies on the S&W identification thread I have to say I know one personally. :)

John Ringo writes guns well for the interested but not informed crowd, I quite liked his academic learning how to load and fire a HK USP while in CQB with attacking aliens. That was Into the Looking Glass IIRC.

Honorable Mention to Larry Niven & Jerry Pournelle for their take on Robert Heinlein as a presidential adviser during an alien invasion in Footfall. Not a great deal of detail, but the idea of honorable men owning personal weapons and having enough gun for the job is covered well.

Larry Corriea gets another thumbs up. He could write for American Handgunner and Fortean Times. His books basically combine the two. :)

Radagast
June 24, 2013, 10:45 AM
Limey46:
I'm betting that a majority of the readers of Baen own guns or approve of people owning guns. The other mega-merged NYC publishing houses?
They wish that people who own guns or approve of them don't exist.

Strange Bob
June 24, 2013, 10:46 AM
Only saw one mention of John Ross in this whole (old) thread but I have read "Unintended Consequences a couple of times! Scintillating!

Also as a child I devoured the Peter Hathaway Capstick books about professional African hunters and every Louis L'Amour novel I could get my hands on!

Certaindeaf
June 24, 2013, 11:27 AM
Darn it.. going from memory I thought "The Lieutenant" was correct.. too lazy to get up and look. It's "Final Blackout". doh! You'll understand if you've read the book though and it's been a long time.
"No Country for Old Men" (Cormac McCarthy) was pretty good. I think in the book there was like one thing that bothered me but I forget what it was.. and it really wasn't the shotgun.

tomrkba
June 24, 2013, 11:53 AM
AWFUL: John Shirley, especially in Everything is Broken. This guy is a real piece of...something. The entire plot could have been stopped in about 15 seconds by four men with California-PC long guns and some determination. The author spends most of the book demonizing liberty and self-sufficiency.

HOOfan_1
June 24, 2013, 12:05 PM
I don't think Steven King is necessarily pro-gun, but the gun details in "The Stand" and in "Lisey's Story" for example ring true and the folks armed in self-defense are not all treated as redneck buffoons, which I have come to expect of mainstream fiction.


The Stand certainly showed guns in a decent light, although King is much closer to be an anti.....http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2013/01/25/stephen-king-releases-gun-control-essay/


I am pretty sure there were some glaring errors in The Stand though. I can't remember exactly what it was, but I think he invented a caliber or something

Beentown
June 24, 2013, 12:23 PM
Good:

Robert R McCammon
Vince Flynn
David Baldacci
Brad Thor
Larry Corriea

Bad:

Most other I have tried to read them.

Manco
June 25, 2013, 02:54 PM
About Koontz, IIRC, he made a fair amount of blunders early on in his career, but it's been so long ago that I'm not positive. I just remember thinking "that's not right!" when I was reading some of his stuff.

Early on Koontz seemed fixated on portraying certain weapons, and didn't account for their strengths, weaknesses, and manners of use very well, but he has expanded his familiarity with the subject considerably since then. It probably wasn't a chore given his personal enthusiasm for firearms and support for our Second Amendment rights.

Ranger Roberts
June 25, 2013, 05:00 PM
Good:

Robert R McCammon
Vince Flynn
David Baldacci
Brad Thor
Larry Corriea

Couldn't agree more!!

Corpral_Agarn
June 25, 2013, 05:55 PM
The last Dick Francis novel i read had some good gun detail in it.
i think it was Twice Shy?
one of the characters shoots a Mauser and a .22 custom rifle for competitions.

Also in (forgot the name) he has a character that's kinda like a secret agent, but we never really know for sure, that carries a Luger and uses it well.

Both seemed pretty spot on to me. Good descriptions and even better action sequences that are closer to reality than many others i have read.

Stephen King was good till i read in one of the Dark Tower books how the character "popped out the cylinder" of Colt SAA to reload. They were still fun to read but i ignored some of the guns stuff after that.

kBob
June 25, 2013, 06:08 PM
Far as I know Linda E. Evans has never made a modern gun error in her Science Fiction whether "here", the near future, or folks from those places time traveling.

But I am biased.

-kBob

dprice3844444
June 25, 2013, 06:11 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Ludlum

kBob
June 25, 2013, 06:23 PM
Looking back through some of the post over the last six and a half years on this thread I noted someone commented on Dean Ing doing his research. Yes he does.

Anyone read his remake of the Soft targets stuff where a bad lady leaves a HK P7 where a youngster can get to it? He basically worked that scene out in a hallway of the World SF/F convention in Baltimore the year KAL 007 was splashed by the Russians. He had a long talk with an HK P7 owner and all around gun nut about the feasibility of the scene and whether a P7 was a good choice.

He also spoke with the owner a Taurus Barfetta 92 clone about that and other guns.

The three of us had a nice half hour or so avoiding other fans in a side hall after being surrounded in the more open area.

-kBob

Hunter125
June 25, 2013, 07:45 PM
I was going to mention Hunter and Baldacci. I've read a lot of Hunter's stuff, but only one of Baldacci's. Most were before I really became a gun guy like I am today, but I remember them having a lot of gun detail. I was also less than impressed with Ludlum's gun detail, although I did like the stories. Clancy seems pretty good too, though he seems more concerned with military hardware than small arms.

Radagast
June 27, 2013, 02:08 AM
kbob:
Are you related or is that your nom de plume? Either way I've bookmarked her Baen page for future purchases. Baen writers tend to be in the good to great band and I like to support gunny authors.

9MMare
June 27, 2013, 02:14 AM
Fully agree that Ludlum is invincibly ignorant. I even wrote him a letter many years ago, offering to proof/edit his stuff. No response, funny that. Here's another gun-Muggle: Jack Higgins. 25 millimetre (Brit, I s'pose) Colt auto, anyone?

I hope it was many yrs ago.....he's been dead for almost 15 yrs.

Edit: Wow, this is an old thread...he'd only been dead 6 yrs when this thread was started!

JohnhenrySTL
June 27, 2013, 02:49 AM
Cormac Maccarthy is my favorite modern author. I loved the guns, and gun scenes in the movie "No Country for Old Men." Heck, I loved the whole movie, one of my favorites of all time.

No Country for Old Men the book, has gun descriptions that entail characteristics of the shooters and their own expressed personality traits to a climax I am unable to even attempt to explain on the internet. As it has been too long since I read it, I may be wrong about this, but I believe he dove right into characterizing a custom built .270 on the first page. If anybody has read it, and found his gun talk flawed, or noticed
it sound, please let me know. Thanks all for the great thread. Forgive my abstract language, lol.

GrOuNd_ZeRo
June 27, 2013, 04:02 PM
Dan Brown has a tendancy to invent firearms, I can't remember what he called it but it provided no results on a search engine, he described it as being very large, I highly doubt the Swiss Guard would be armed with anything large and exotic described in the book, other guns were very generically mentioned.

In another Dan Brown book, deception point, he described the Delta-Operators to have 'snub-nose machineguns', two terms NEVER used in the same sentene, the only weapons I could envision was a P90, MP-5K or perhaps a M249 Para model or something like a M60E.

Madcap_Magician
June 27, 2013, 04:41 PM
Good:

Stephen Hunter
Larry Correia
Michael Z. Williamson

Adequate:

Vince Flynn
Tom Clancy
Dale Brown
David Baldacci (Sometimes)
Stephen Hunter (Sometimes)

Abysmal:

David Baldacci
David Morrell
Robert Ludlum

Actually, most all Baen authors are pretty good, too, but you seldom see firearms minutiae in most.

Tom Fury
June 29, 2013, 07:09 AM
Sometimes I think he subcontracts the gun bits out; either he doesn't know one end of a 1911 from the other or he just does a bad job of describing the experience (which too many of us have had to not notice)
Cheers, TF

Rittmeister
June 29, 2013, 11:15 AM
Anybody into W.E.B. Griffin? The Brotherhood of War series, Badge of Honor, and The Corps all have pretty good gun details, mostly centered around the weapons available to our armed forces during WWII and the Korea/Vietnam War eras.

They're not really action novels per se but the scenes where there is action are pretty well researched and written. Particularly memorable is a scene where two of the main characters in the BOW series are detailed to Greece just after the end of WWII and a crusty old Warrant Officer armorer is explaining the personal weapons available to them, which are mostly captured German or surplus British weapons as the US-supplied stuff hasn't started arriving yet in quantity.

They're good reads if your into minutiae. I'm not as impressed with Griffin's most recent efforts, he's been co-writing with another author (Butterworth, I think) and the tone of the books has changed significantly.

X-JaVeN-X
June 29, 2013, 11:22 AM
I will honestly say that I am a bit inept in this category, but I will mention, only because I remember my wife and father in law talking about how much they enjoyed the book(s). I had to google search the author's name as I only knew what they called the book.

The name of the book that I remember hearing them talk about was "The Things They Carried" by Tim O'Brien. I don't know if this fits your criteria, but you might want to check it out.

Tom Fury
June 29, 2013, 05:46 PM
annoyed me a couple times in 11/22/63, which was otherwise a fantastic read; I think it had more to do with one of his characters I liked getting hurt because they either didn't have access to or had bad knowledge of how to use a gun they had access to; He's much better on vintage Rock 'n Roll...

Trunk Monkey
June 29, 2013, 10:04 PM
Has anyone mentioned Louis L'Amour? I have to shake my head every time I read "How The West Was Won" when one of the main characters ,Linus Rawlings, fires three shots as fast as he can aim with what (based on the time period) must be a flintlock

To be fair though it's still a good book

HoosierQ
June 30, 2013, 08:50 AM
Tony Hillerman is both. He seems not to understand handguns very well as his police officers are always "removing the safety catch" from their revolvers when they're in imminent danger. Gangsters with .38 caliber automatics (there is the .38 Super of course so he gets a pass there I suppose).

He's, however, always got his rifles right. Lot's of 30-30s (none with safeties), bolt actions, and other hunting rifles.

He was a veteran of D-Day I believe.

Certaindeaf
June 30, 2013, 09:45 AM
Who's the most cheeseball? I remember reading some Mickey Spilane or somesuch and his gun scenes were akin to the old Batman series or comic books complete with POW!, WHOMP!, "SOCK!, etc. etc. Pretty fun reads though.

762 X 54r
July 1, 2013, 12:31 AM
I will also put in for correia.

GoWolfpack
July 2, 2013, 01:12 PM
I will honestly say that I am a bit inept in this category, but I will mention, only because I remember my wife and father in law talking about how much they enjoyed the book(s). I had to google search the author's name as I only knew what they called the book.

The name of the book that I remember hearing them talk about was "The Things They Carried" by Tim O'Brien. I don't know if this fits your criteria, but you might want to check it out.
Not a lot of gun minutia in "The Things They Carried" except for general description of types of weaponry carried by foot soldiers in Vietnam. A fascinating book though. Quick and very engaging read about the emotional toll of serving in Vietnam.

If they liked that book, they should try reading "Short Timers" by Gustav Hasford, the book that formed the basis for "Full Metal Jacket".


I'm glad Stephen King learned to just steer clear of too many gun details. I would rather read less detail than wrong detail, and I love his storytelling.

TRX
July 4, 2013, 08:38 PM
I'm reading "The Quiller Memorandum" right now. I know I read it 30 or 40 years ago, but I didn't remember much about it.

The writing is... I guess a literary critic would call it "idiosyncratic", but it was probably broken and weird even by the standards of British writers of the early 1960s. It does make sense, though, once you read around all the strange indirect dialogue.

I'm bringing it up because I just ran into a description of a "Pelmann and Rosenthal" 8mm pistol. I hit Google, and the only hits I found went back to the book. I have no idea why he made it up; there were gun stores and gun magazines in most British towns back then, he could have picked a real gun easily enough.


At least part of the story line of H. Beam Piper's "Police Action" hinged on the main character carrying a 1937 Sharps' bolt action in .235 Ultraspeed-Express...

Radagast
July 5, 2013, 12:36 PM
Piper wrote alternate history/alternate timeline stories. So it was probably correct - for that timeline.

TRX
July 5, 2013, 10:50 PM
Yes. And a few years back I vowed that if I ever decided to do a 6mm wildcat, I'd call it ".235 Ultraspeed-Express."

Actually, the .244 H&H Magnum is probably the most "ultra" you're going to get out of a 6mm...

Mat, not doormat
July 7, 2013, 04:39 AM
Bad: Ian Fleming, Sarah Paretsky, Stieg Larsson. The whys have already been hashed out in the thread, but those always irked me when reading them.

Good: Tom Clancy, Vince Flynn, Barry Eisler, Larry Correia.

The fantastically awful: Lee Child. :barf:

An odd one: Larry McMurtry. Author of Lonesome Dove, one of the greatest westerns ever written. He did enough research about the guns of the old west to know that not everything was a Colt Peacemaker, but then stopped. As a result, he seems to think that an 1860 Henry was more powerful than a Winchester '73, or that an otherwise intelligent person would carry a Walker as a belt gun, long after functional weapons half its weight had been in common use for years.

Also, there were a few mentions of Louis L'Amour, but no one seems to have pointed out the salient fact about nearly all his heroes: they were early adopters. He's just about always got his guys packing the most advanced thing that was available at the time. When all the conservative people were still using muzzleloaders, his hero used a breech loading Ferguson Rifle. When everyone else was using single shots, he gave his hero a brace of Lorenzoni repeating flintlock pistols. When the rest of the world (including the historical JB Hickok) was still using cap and ball, his heroes were packing S&W .44 Russian top break cartridge pistols. He had guys using Spencer carbines with Blakeslee speed loaders. All kinds of exotic, cutting edge weaponry showed up in his books. He did stray from the true path in having gunfighters denoted by their tied down rigs, fast draw gunfights at high noon and such, but he also pointed out that only a tenderfoot would wear shiny silver conchos, or festoon his horse's tack with same, were he riding in hostile territory. Tactical good sense for the 1800s.

Lorenzoni:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_hnC6x036Q&feature=youtube_gdata_player

T2K
July 7, 2013, 05:14 AM
Someone had a post in this thread in 2007 or so about the Jack Reacher novels.

Now that the movie is out, it made me want to read the books (I've not done so yet).

The movie was certainly heavy on gun stuff / ballistics / shooting.

Trunk Monkey
July 7, 2013, 08:35 AM
When all the conservative people were still using muzzleloaders, his hero used a breech loading Ferguson Rifle.

To be fair the fact the Ferguson Rifle was given to the hero by Major Ferguson was a key plot point of the story and the title of the book. L'Amour also has the other characters fairly impressed by the gun,

Schlegel
July 7, 2013, 03:04 PM
Tony Hillerman is both. He seems not to understand handguns very well as his police officers are always "removing the safety catch" from their revolvers when they're in imminent danger. Gangsters with .38 caliber automatics (there is the .38 Super of course so he gets a pass there I suppose).

He's, however, always got his rifles right. Lot's of 30-30s (none with safeties), bolt actions, and other hunting rifles.

He was a veteran of D-Day I believe.
To be fair, 38acp is a real, but obsolete caliber. I have never read Hillerman, but if his gangsters are early 20th C, it would be appropriate.

Mat, not doormat
July 7, 2013, 03:15 PM
To be fair the fact the Ferguson Rifle was given to the hero by Major Ferguson was a key plot point of the story and the title of the book. L'Amour also has the other characters fairly impressed by the gun,
Not saying otherwise, just pointing out that his characters had a thing for advanced (for the time) weaponry, and frequently used it to its full advantage at the peak of the plot.

Trunk Monkey
July 7, 2013, 08:49 PM
Not saying otherwise, just pointing out that his characters had a thing for advanced (for the time) weaponry, and frequently used it to its full advantage at the peak of the plot.

I seem to remember one where the hero had a 12 shot revolver and tricked the bad guy into thinking he was empty

Mat, not doormat
July 7, 2013, 10:03 PM
That sounds familiar, but didn't stand out as much as the repeating flintlocks. Lol. I think that awesome and Lazeroni should be considered synonymous.

Sent from my C771 using Tapatalk 2

TRX
July 8, 2013, 09:25 PM
> 12 shot revolver

Lefeucheaux made revolvers with more cartridges than that, for a good chunk of the 1800s. Both pinfire and centerfire. They were famously carried by some Confederate officers, but were still sold long after the war. A common arrangement had a two-row cylinder, upper and lower barrels, and a two-position firing pin.

Along with the shotgun shell and smokeless powder, the French had some notable pistol designs too.

evan price
July 9, 2013, 07:26 AM
Lee Child. I really like reading the Jack Reacher books, but Child is an Englishman with little gun experience. For example-
In Without Fail he based the entire survival of Reacher on his recognizing that a semi-auto Beretta M9 pistol had been stored with loaded magazined for a long time, and that the gun would then jam when fired due to the magazine springs going weak from being compressed by the loaded ammo.

I swear the guy gets his gun knowledge by trolling The Highroad.... :/

Trunk Monkey
July 9, 2013, 10:46 AM
Not an author but I remember watching an episode of Ironsides in which Raymond Burr refered to an M1911 as a revolver while holding it in his hand.

I assume that was a scriptwriter mistake but even so you'd think Burr would have mentioned the mistake if he had caught it.

Mat, not doormat
July 9, 2013, 04:20 PM
Script and props often don't agree. CSI Miami is particularly bad about that. Like Horatio holding a crow bar and talking about a tire iron.

Of course, the list of dumb things said or done on that show is monumental.

Trunk Monkey
July 10, 2013, 11:08 AM
I wasn't clear, Burr refered to the pistol as a 1911 revolver

JShirley
July 10, 2013, 11:32 AM
As mpmarty said, Ludlum is the worst. I remember reading his description of his hero jamming in a "banana (i.e., curving) clip" into his Uzi...

zorro45
July 19, 2013, 09:26 PM
I just finished Stephen Hunter's The Third Bullet and I enjoyed it. I have read all of his books that I can find and while I have a little trouble with "suspension of disbelief" I found this one enjoyable.
I like the sense of justice in the Robert Parker books, and I do like the way he makes his characters talk.
As far as Lee Child goes, I kind of live that lifestyle myself, being 6'4, 210, fighting evildoers 4 or 5 at a time.... Well, this is a discussion about fiction.

Flashman
July 20, 2013, 08:34 PM
Barry Eisler--excellent, for more than just guns.

PapaG
October 22, 2013, 10:18 PM
I just discovered T.Jefferson Parker. A mistake per page, almost. Read The Iron Road for laughs.

mp510
October 23, 2013, 06:59 PM
When I was in High School, I really like Robb White's Deathwatch.

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