Ruger Blackhawk .357 mag


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armtpo
February 12, 2007, 04:49 PM
Hello everyone,till now all I've owned and shot were semi-auto handguns, all sizes all calibers. But now I'm in the market for my first revolver. It's main purpose would be for the range. I've got my eye on a Ruger Blackhawk .357 magnum in stainless steel with a 6.5 inch barrel. I have two specific questions about this gun that I could not really find when I did a search. First off, everyone likes to exclaim how durable this gun is but I'm interested in the sheer accuracy of it. I hand load so I can tailor loads but how tight of groups is this gun capable of? Second, How is the trigger out of the box? Trigger is one of the most important features of any gun right behind reliability in my opinion. Wolff offers a trigger pull reduction kit that I looked into as an after market add-on. I also planned on installing a weaver base with a Bushnell red dot sight on it. Money is a factor in my purchase so Freedom Arms revolvers are out the door. Any helpful advice and opinions would be appreciated.

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Cosmoline
February 12, 2007, 05:03 PM
New Model I assume. There's also the old model and the (new) old model. If it's big and beefy with "New Model" on the side, then it's a new model. You should find it very accurate. I wouldn't get the Wolff unless the factory is really gritty. I haven't had a problem with SA triggers on Rugers. The one gripe I have with NM Blackhawks is the #@$! cylinder that's a pain to unload. When the gate's open the cylinder spins, but only one way and it has a tendency to lock the spent round just beyond the edge so you have to rotate all the way around again to get it. With practice you can get the hang of it, but this is one area where the SAA and clones are superior.

I'm not sure about mounting a base on the NM Blackhawks. I'm sure others here will chime in about what the best method is.

MCgunner
February 12, 2007, 06:10 PM
You're going to scope it anyway, so balance and light weight are not an issue, get the old model for strength. I shoot a hot, hot, beyond hot, hotter'n anything I'd shoot in any other gun, 14.5 grains AA#9 behind a 180 grain Hornady XTP. This load pushes near 800 ft lbs at the muzzle, 1450 fps. This bullet is 2" high at 50 and dead on at 100 and shoots under 4MOA meaning it'll put 6 rounds off the bench into under an inch at 25 yards. How far under an inch I don't know, because 1" off sandbags is about all I can do with iron sights. If I had a scope on it, it might do better, or if I had a ransom rest or something. I routinely, much to the amazement of rifle guys watching, put 6 rounds of those things into a sub 4" circle with irons on 100 yard targets. With a scope, I might even reduce that to 3" or something, no way to know. With irons, that's the best I can get out of it.

Anyway, it's more accurate than I am, put it that way. The trigger I haven't put a scale on, but I'd guess it breaks about 4 lbs or so, pretty light as is and it's crisp so I don't wanna mess with it. I don't like really light, dangerous to use triggers on a hunting/outdoor handgun that I might wanna fire with gloves on, same with rifles actually. This gun ain't just a range queen, it's a working outdoor and hunting revolver and has taken rabbits to deer, hiked all over the Guadelupe mountains, and is one of my favorite outdoor revolvers for serious work. I don't scope it so it'll be light enough to tote packing. I have a scoped Contender for most of my handgun hunting now days. I traded a Ruger Security Six straight up for this Blackhawk and I feel I got the better part of that deal, for sure. This thing is a tack driver with those 180 grain loads, equally accurate with my wadcutter 38s (for which I've marked the sight setting) and only a little less accurate with 158 grain SWCs. Those SWCs don't shoot as flat as the 180s, 14.5 grains 2400 and a Lee gas checked bullet. That's my standard hot .357 outdoor load, not overly hot for my other .357s.

IMHO, you cannot find a finer outdoor revolver SHORT of a Freedom Arms than a Blackhawk and the .357 is one strong gun that will last forever especially in stainless. Mine's a blued gun, but it's still rugged. I've got Blackhawks in both .357 and .45 Colt. The .45 I handload to .44 mag levels of power. It's a stainless 4 5/8 gun and I think the .357 is nearly as light because the grip frame is aluminum rather than the stainless steel of the stainless gun. And, I carry both guns in the same holster. I'll never sell either one of these guns, both more accurate than I am and rugged and powerful. My only quandary when I leave the house for the field is which one am I gonna carry? :D

461
February 12, 2007, 06:13 PM
The Blackhawk is a fine weapon and I guarantee it'll outshoot you with the right loads. Trigger is not a problem, plenty of fixes if you don't like it and it's very easy to work on yourself if you really feel it's needed.

Cosmo- you sound like a candidate for a freespin pawl for the new model. Several different companies offer them or you can even do the surgery on your own. Makes a big difference.

jflovelady
April 5, 2007, 02:14 AM
I have the same revolver. Trigger is fine out of the box and it shoots better than I can. Shot 110 grainers, 125's and 158's. We both prefer the 110's.

Reddbecca
April 5, 2007, 10:10 AM
I've got a New Model Blackhawk, .357 Magnum caliber and 6.5" barrel. It's very accurate in nature, but I haven't had much luck because the back sights aren't properly adjusted. Once that issue is handled though, it'll probably hit a clay pigeon dead center at 50 yards.

Trigger pull, I don't really know. I did one of these trigger jobs http://www.gunblast.com/Poorboy.htm and it's light and quick, but I don't know anything about crispiness or drag or pull. Never had a single action revolver before.

carterbeauford
April 5, 2007, 10:24 AM
I can hit a steel plate at 50 yards with mine without even really trying, good enough for me. Trigger has no creep and breaks very smooth. I can find no faults with this revolver.

YodaVader
April 5, 2007, 07:22 PM
First off, everyone likes to exclaim how durable this gun is but I'm interested in the sheer accuracy of it. I hand load so I can tailor loads but
how tight of groups is this gun capable of?

I have owned four 357 Blackhawks through the years and currently own a 6 1/2" and 4 5/8" - both the blued version. Both aquired last year. I have fired the 6 1/2" gun more and it has shot pretty well for me.

Guessing by my better targets shot standing offhand I would say my BH is at least good for 10 ring accuracy if fired from a machine rest or scoped and shot from a solid rest. Ten ring on the NRA 25 yard slowfire is about 1.5" and the 50 Yard SF a little over 3.3". It would not surprise me if the BH could group half that size at each distance when tested by the above mentioned methods.
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a106/celestron4/357TARGETS50and25YDS.jpg

The shots on the 50 yard target have 22 holes but the 6 lower holes are the 357.

Second, How is the trigger out of the box? Trigger is one of the most important features of any gun right behind reliability in my opinion. Wolff offers a trigger pull reduction kit that I looked into as an after market add-on

I have owned at least 8 Ruger SA revolvers and all have to some degree exhibited creep in the trigger pull. Some worse than others. The best I have in regards to less creep is a 31 year old Super Blackhawk 44.

There is more to trigger quality than weight of pull. While the spring kit will lower the pull weight , if there was creep to begin with , you will still have a creep after the spring kit installation.

None of the SA Rugers I have in stock form are anywhere close to one of my Smiths fired in the SA mode.

Waffen
April 5, 2007, 08:10 PM
I purchased a 6.5" .357 Blackhawk for my first revolver and it's plenty accurate. I've shot a few thousand handloads from mine. Mine seems to like H110 and 158gr Hornady XTP's, I'd love to see what this would do out of a machine rest because I know it's much more accurate than I am.

The trigger for me left a little to be desired. I come from a background of precision bolt gun shooting so I'm used to triggers that are in the 1-5 ounce area and have absolutely no creep or overtravel. I felt that the factory trigger was way too heavy and was slightly creepy. I used some stones to lighten the pull, and to smooth up the transfer bar , and I also replaced the factory trigger spring (not the hammer spring). This made the trigger much better.

TargetTerror
April 5, 2007, 10:00 PM
I had the exact Blackhawk you are thinking of buying. I wound up trading it in for a S&W 686 with a 6 inch barrel. My main gripe with the Blackhawk, was that it was single action, but that's more a knock on me then the gun :neener:

I also find that i shoot the Smith MUCH better. I believe it has to do with the better trigger and slightly shorter lock time of the hammer fall. I like the trigger on the Smith MUCH better. I found it a bit lighter out of the box, very crips, and I liked the feel of it much better (how it felt when it broke). Try the two and you will see.

Bullet
April 6, 2007, 03:44 AM
armtpo
I've got my eye on a Ruger Blackhawk .357 magnum in stainless steel with a 6.5 inch barrel.

Ive got one Id sell. Send me a private message if interested.

earthworm
April 6, 2007, 04:50 AM
Get the convertable.You can still find 9mm pretty cheap. If it's 'too late' you can ship it to Ruger & they'll fit one.Be advised if it's an Old Model Ruger'll automatically put the New Model trigger with transfer bar in it.

earthworm
April 6, 2007, 06:28 AM
To say nothing of the fun you'll have casually mentioning your "9mm revolver".
*VBEG*

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