Walther P99 vs. Smith&Wesson P99


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hrgrisso
February 12, 2007, 07:35 PM
So I like the Walther but the local shops here are carrying the Smith for a lot less. I know there are a few differences and figured this was a good place to ask. What are the pros/cons to them since they are so exact? Is it to much to ask for enlightenment?:o

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wally
February 12, 2007, 07:48 PM
If you want the AS DA/SA model instead of the SA QA model, I think Walther is only importing the QA model at present. Nothing wrong with the QA except the now mostly useless decocker is still there and takes the gun out of action until you partially retract the slide to reset the trigger -- just cycling to eject like it was a dud is probably a more reliable thing to do as if you go back too far you can cause a double feed type jam.

I went with the SW99 because S&W makes it in .45ACP, Walther doesn't :neener:

--wally.

PX15
February 12, 2007, 07:49 PM
I'm relatively new to the Walther P99/SW99 party, so take my opinion with a grain of salt.

My favorite Walther "guru" is Shipwreck, and he has both. I think he says one is just as good as the other..

The SW99 comes with a lifetime warranty from S&W, which has an excellent customer policy. The Walther has a one year warranty.. From the same folks..

I'm an old fart and a lifetime warranty just isn't a big deal to me.. If I were younger it would have more attractiveness... On the other hand, I don't remember ever having a problem with a new pistol/revolver of any quality, so haven't needed even a one year warranty.

I'm just "gun snobby" enough to enjoy having the Walther logo on my pistols as opposed to Smith & Wesson. Some folks say the Walthers, all German built are better than the Smiths, but I doubt that, and even if they are it can't be by much.

Did I mention I just enjoy having the Walther logo on my pistols?

I'm an old Walther lover anyway. I had a PP in the past. I have a surplus P1, and a surplus P5 now.. So my P99c/AS and my P99/AS fit right in.

My buddy has the SW99 and is quite happy with it.

I know one thing, I love the "AS" trigger/striker very much.. More accuracy than I can take advantage of.

Best Wishes,

J. Pomeroy

modifiedbrowning
February 12, 2007, 10:46 PM
The main differences between the two is the contour of the slides and that the SW slide is blackened stainless steel, while the Walther is carbon steel.
All frames are made by Walther. Afaik SW currently only selling the QA version (Glock like trigger). Walther has the QA and the AS triggers.
The AS is like a DA/SA with a third setting when the pistol is loaded.
If you don't mind the Glock like trigger get the SW, it is a fine pistol.
I prefer a DA/SA setup so I have Walther. I'm also a Walther fan so that helped my decision as well.
Check out The Walther FAQ (http://www.praxagora.com/lunde/WaltherP99FAQ/) for some good info.

Shipwreck
February 12, 2007, 10:54 PM
Wally, actually Walther is importing the A/S - they started again in Spring 2006.

What was said above is correct, however - the SW99 was discontinued at the end of 2005. The SW99 is the same as the P99 A/S.

The SW990L is the same as the P99 QA - except there is no decocker button at all.

I do not like the QA trigger. It is similiar to a Glock/XD, but heavier. The A/S trigger is what makes the P99 popular.

If U can get an original SW99, it is about the same. While discontinued, there are still new ones floating around. Admittedly, the Walther version looks kewler. I bought a SW99 when I had no luck finding a fullsize P99. I later found one.

The SW99 is well made. Its really just a matter of preference. If U buy the SW99 and like it, U may eventually wanna get the original Walther version.

Be aware that the SW990L is not in the 2007 S&W catalog at all. So, it appears that this too may be discontinued.

cocojo
February 13, 2007, 11:29 AM
Wally the decocker on the QA models is not a decocker. The only use for it is to take the pistol down for cleaning. Instead of pulling the trigger as in the glock models, walther chose to use this button instead. They probably felt it was a safer way to disassemble their pistols for cleaning.
The AS models use the decockers

RustyShackelford
February 13, 2007, 12:23 PM
I had the WaltherUSA catalog in 2004 and I remember they listed a part you could add to some P99 models to give the pistol an ambi-slide release. Is this same part available to new SW99s or just the Walther models?

I'm left handed and like the idea of the total ambi-controls on the Walther 99 series.

I heard the NJ State Police tested the SW99 model but it was so bad they decided to go with a different brand/model.

Rusty

PS: I'm interested in the DA only type(one smooth trigger pull for each shot) pistols, but I think WaltherUSA no longer sells that type either :rolleyes: .

Shipwreck
February 13, 2007, 01:06 PM
They never imported the ambi slide release versions, despite the photos.

The DAO supposedly is the only one that has this, but I've never actually seen one (DAO, NOT a QA).

No one likes the DAO here in the states...

As for the New Jersey thing - they put stupid constraints on the gun. They didn't want a decocker button at all, which essentially left the gun w/ no way to decock it to put it back in DA mode - Basically, you would have to unlaod the gun and dry fire it to make it go back to DA mode. Stupid plan.

After all that bending over backwards S&W did even after warning them, NJ finally realized their mistake. And, they came up with some othere excuse as to not to go with it. They couldn't really admit that their idea was stupid, now could they? :P

TonyT
February 13, 2007, 04:00 PM
I have both the S&W 99 and the Walther P99QA. I enjoy shooting both of them. Both are equally reliable and accurate, surprisingly accurate for a short barreled pistol.
The plus side of the S&W 99 is the ability to pull the trigger more than once if you have a round which fails to fire. It's also a traditional DA/SA setup.

The Walther P99QA is a DA pistol with a consistent and relatively light DA pull without the ability to pull the trigger a second time in a FTF situation.

Storm
February 23, 2007, 03:00 PM
I have a Walther P99 (.40 S&W) and just today bought a "like new" SW99 in .45. One difference that I noticed right away, and this could be important, is that the Walther has a proprietary rail greatly limiting light choices, and the SW has a "standard" rail (weaver/picatinny?) that will take just about anything.

Shipwreck
February 23, 2007, 07:02 PM
Since 2004, the Walther and S&W share the same rail. Walther changed from the proprietary rail to the same open rail that is on the SW99.

wally
February 23, 2007, 10:39 PM
Wally the decocker on the QA models is not a decocker. The only use for it is to take the pistol down for cleaning. Instead of pulling the trigger as in the glock models, walther chose to use this button instead. They probably felt it was a safer way to disassemble their pistols for cleaning.
The AS models use the decockers

On the QA model I looked at, it most certainly is a decocker -- after pressing it the trigger does nothing until you partially retract the slide to reset it, like a Glock. Its not intended to be a decocker, perhaps; but if hit by accident or during a struggle the gun is out of action until you can do tap-rack-bang. If its only for take down it should have a spring loaded detent pin to prevent it moving by accident.

--wally.

HorseSoldier
February 23, 2007, 11:06 PM
I heard the NJ State Police tested the SW99 model but it was so bad they decided to go with a different brand/model.


Like Shipwreck said, the NJSP apparently did not understand how the gun worked and insisted on unsafe modifications to the design. Doesn't really reflect on the Walther (or S&W copies) so much as the idiots writing the weapon specs in New Jersey.

Spent Shell
February 24, 2007, 10:00 AM
So if the frame on the SW99 is made by Walther, while S&W makes the slide, is everything INSIDE the frame (trigger mechanics etc.) original Walther as well? Or does Walther send just the polymer frame?

How does the SW99 .45 fit into this? Since Walther never chambered the P99 in .45 do they use the same trigger? The frame says made in Gemany so I assume that's still Walther but what about everything else?

PX15
February 24, 2007, 10:27 AM
FWIW:

Sorry to intrude on this Walther P99 vs S&W SW99 discussion, but just thought I'd mention that CDNN is still selling new, factory, full capacity mags for less than $30.00.

I ordered two yesterday for my P99/AS, and two for my friends SW99... All mags will be marked S&W, and capacity will be 16rds.. Since MecGar makes them all the only difference will be my P99/AS will be sporting S&W marked mags, no problem for me.

Since I read there was an issue with 16rd'ers in the Walthers I'll just download by one each time.

With the new "political climate" in DC I figured if I wanted any extra full capacity mags at a reasonable price I might as well go ahead and buy them now while they're available, and not so costly.

If you have any interest in obtaining extra factory mags for your full sized Walthers or Smith&Wessons you might want to check CDNN out.

Best Wishes,

J. Pomeroy

Storm
February 24, 2007, 11:03 AM
Since 2004, the Walther and S&W share the same rail. Walther changed from the proprietary rail to the same open rail that is on the SW99.

That's good to know and is useful for those folks considering a used Walther. Mine is a 2002 or 2003 so I have the closed rails.

I really do love the Walther P99, and now the SW99. To have that basic gun also in .45 is pure heaven. The two guns are different enough (besides calibers) to justify owning both. While I enjoy the Teutonic look of the sharp edged Walther slide, the rounded contours of the Smith are quite nice and are more no-snag.

For practical purposes what is the difference between having a stainless steel slide and the carbon steel slide?

Shipwreck
February 24, 2007, 07:39 PM
Not much difference - the stainless is a bit more rust resistant and looks kewler.

But, U can hard chrome them like I did for a nice 2 tone look :)

samdraper
October 17, 2009, 05:31 PM
I have a 2003 like new P99. Does anyone know where I can get a piccanny rail to fit it?

Thanks

Browns Fan
October 17, 2009, 05:43 PM
I had the opportunity a couple of months to buy a S&W P99 OL .40 compact that had a stainless slide and nite sites for $459. Are you saying that they are discontinued and I probably wont have another opportunity?

Dang it! I really liked that gun. It had a really nice trigger! I shoulda put it on layaway!

NCPatrolAR
October 18, 2009, 03:29 AM
We were issued the SW99 (.40) here for a couple of years and had nothing but problems out of them. Ours were the DA/Sa model and we had multiple guns, new out of the box, that would only fire DA, not fire at all, etc. When we started to expereince multiple sear housing failures we ditched the 99 and went to the M&P. I'm a huge fan of S&W pistols but view the 99 as a steaming pile of poo. I refused to buy my duty gun when we transitioned and probably wouldnt have taken it if they had given it to me for free.

NCPatrolAR
October 18, 2009, 03:31 AM
I have a Walther P99 (.40 S&W) and just today bought a "like new" SW99 in .45. One difference that I noticed right away, and this could be important, is that the Walther has a proprietary rail greatly limiting light choices, and the SW has a "standard" rail (weaver/picatinny?) that will take just about anything.
The SW99 typically requires a special adaptor plate for most lights to fit it. The rail is shorter than those found on most other pistols.

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