Hoppe's #9 questions


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Lucky
February 24, 2007, 02:04 AM
When you're using Hoppes on rifles handguns and shotguns, do you dunk dirty parts in a tub of it and then wipe it off them? If so, do you pour the used solvent back into the jug for further use later?

What parts do you need to oil after cleaning with Hoppe's?

The instructions talk about gas fouling rising from the expansion cracks overnight for the next couple days. Do you wait for that to be done before applying oil?

Thanks;
Scott

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ArchAngelCD
February 24, 2007, 02:18 AM
I use #9 to clean all my guns. I wipe a light film of oil on the outside of the gun after cleaning and then wipe it clean. The only other parts that get oiled are moving parts like the center of a revolver cylinder, the slide contacts on a semi-auto and pivot points like the break-open on a single shot shotgun.

odysseus
February 24, 2007, 02:58 AM
"If so, do you pour the used solvent back into the jug for further use later?"

Everything I have read about Hoppes says not to do this. Once the impurities hit it, it's powers degrade. Reusing the fluid does not have the same effectiveness.

Plus I think personally, one would be just transferring dirt around. I don't need to use a lot of Hoppes by the way. Don't see a need to use so much to dunk a part in rather than apply what you need to the piece.

rustymaggot
February 24, 2007, 03:09 AM
i use small amounts of hoppes9 and then either wipe with paper towels or spray the gun out with brake cleaner or starter fluid. then i oil.

wd40 is great if you need to soak the parts. i spray down guns after shooting and clean a day or two later. 95% of the gunk can be lifted by wd40, and it softens the harder stuff so less hoppes9 and scrubbing is needed.

and i like the smell of wd40.

Lucky
February 24, 2007, 03:18 AM
So when people talk about 'soaking' something in Hoppes, they're not really putting it in a bowl full of the stuff?

EricTheBarbarian
February 24, 2007, 03:56 AM
i put hoppes on a q tip and swap it on. then use the dry end to dry it off, but the stuff evaporates pretty quick so theres no problem with it. I dont let it soak in a bucket, i only have a smal 8oz bottle but a bucket off it would not be good with all the fumes eventhough i like the smell

scrat
February 24, 2007, 12:58 PM
i hardly use hoppes any more. hardly ever. for one i hate the smell of the stuff. as it is i have to clean the guns outside. cause my wife hates the smell of the stuff. then it just takes to long. so i use carb cleaner or brake cleaner. i go shooting come back home on my ruger i take off the grips. then open the chamber and spray away. then do the same down the barrel. it drys rather quick and its easy to see what you have missed. on the parts i missed i spray again. then depending on which gun. if i can take it apart. i will and spray the parts individually. then oil it all up and put it back together. after that i take a dry patch through the barrel. to see how we are doing. then i take either hoppes if its still dirty or oil if its clean.

byf43
February 24, 2007, 01:19 PM
Hoppe's #9. That's some GOOOOOOOD aftershave!!!!


Seriously, though.
I buy it by the quart bottle.
I have a smaller bottle that I work from.
Pour a small amount into a tupperware measuring cup and clean the firearm(s) from that.
NEVER pour unused Hoppe's back into the container. Doing so will ruin what is in the 'big' container.

No need to soak any parts in #9. Just clean it, wipe it dry. Then lube with CLP.

Lucky
February 24, 2007, 04:45 PM
Thanks guys. As a follow-up, on my AR15 bolt, on the end opposite the face, there's some black crud built-up and I am having trouble getting it off. Toothbrush, fingernail, rags can't get it off. What's the trick there?

thales
February 24, 2007, 05:35 PM
*


Thanks guys. As a follow-up, on my AR15 bolt, on the end opposite the face, there's some black crud built-up and I am having trouble getting it off. Toothbrush, fingernail, rags can't get it off. What's the trick there?

Berryman ChemDip, available at better auto parts stores everywhere, is designed to remove caked-on varnish, carbon, gasket material, etc., from old carburetors by soaking prior to rebuilding them. It comes in a small bucket with a strainer basket. It is not cheap for one use, but it can be used repeatedly. Just soak your Ar-15 bolt or M-1 piston in it for as long as it takes. If you shoot semi-auto rifles a lot, like if you are a Service Rifle competitor, then it is well worth it.

It really stinks. It will destroy most kinds of rubber or plastic. It is really hard on skin, so wear eye protection and don't get any on you. It works better than anything else I know of. The alternative involves scraping tools and elbow grease.


*

B.D. Turner
February 24, 2007, 07:13 PM
wd40 is great if you need to soak the parts

Several years ago I used to hang around a gunsmiths shop learning what I could about fixing firearms. The owner of the shop was a master gunsmith who other smiths would send things they couldn't fix to. Anyway... Every hunting season a couple of hunters would come in with a Remington semi auto rifle that just wouldn't cycle rounds. My friend would fix the rifles and when they came to pick them up he would say keep the WD40 away from the inside. These guys would almost always say "how did you know I use WD40?" He would say all that WD40 varnish build up is why I know. The guys would always confess that they only used WD40 to spray everything and put the gun away. WD40 will ruin gas rings and build up a varnish that only a blow toarch will remove. If you are going to use WD40 spray it on a rag and then wipe off the outside of your rifle never use it on internal parts.

obxned
February 24, 2007, 07:36 PM
If women ever want a perfume that actually attracts men, it will be equal parts Hoppe's, wet dog, and fire cooked steak,

rustymaggot
February 24, 2007, 11:45 PM
WD40 will ruin gas rings and build up a varnish that only a blow toarch will remove.

wd40 , if kept wet for 3 days, will remove its own residue. no blowtorch needed.

keep in mind that i wrote about using wd40 for loosening carbon before cleaning, and keeping rust at bay till a more conveniant time to clean.

rockstar.esq
February 25, 2007, 12:07 AM
obxned If women ever want a perfume that actually attracts men, it will be equal parts Hoppe's, wet dog, and fire cooked steak,

You've got that right!

Personally I don't use WD-40 on anything other than door hinges. Ever since I've tried Kroil I've never found any other oil to be worth a hoot for guns. As for solvents, I've switched to Butches for most carbon & copper removal. I also use Flitz metal polish on a microfiber rag which does a great job. The more stubborn stuff gets worked on with a copper scouring pad, a stiff nylon gun brush, and/or lead removal cloth.

I've personally seen folks who ruined the finish on their gun using brake cleaner. It's outright stupid to "save" money this way. Starting fluid doesn't sound like a great idea either, mostly because it doesn't do squat to copper fouling. Again Hoppes isn't that expensive, why not just buy something intended for the purpose?

A bit off topic but still related. If you mix a little powdered Moly (for tumble lubing rifle bullets) with a little rubbing alcohol you can make a paste that you can paint on with a Q-tip. The paste takes literal seconds to dry and when applied to moving parts forms a bond to the metal of each part. The net result can be a few pounds reduction on your trigger pull and a slicker feel to your guns action. The best part of all is that the lube is dry, won't wipe off, and won't burn off when the gun gets hot. Be careful applying it because Moly is a dark gray and it'll stain something fierce. Frequently I'll paint the rails of my semiauto pistols, give em a dab of grease and the slide feels slicker than snail snot!

g5reality
February 25, 2007, 12:13 AM
First I dip a cotton mop in Hopps #9 and clean, followed by a no-harm brass brush, followed again with a dry mop or dry patch. After it's clean, I then lightly oil the inside of the barrel and dry patch again to clean off excess oil. Then I'm done.

This of course is after I have bore snaked @ the range a few times before returning home.

A clean gun/rifle is a good thing.

Lucky
February 25, 2007, 12:43 PM
Great, thanks guys.

GRIZ22
February 25, 2007, 01:13 PM
The only thing that goes into my bottle of Hoppes is a clean patch. I then apply the Hoppes to whatever I'm trying to clean.

MilsurpShooter
February 26, 2007, 12:01 PM
I fire Milsurps with corrosive and am a little bit of a nut when it comes to cleaning. I usually pick up a large bottle of Hoppes when I order something, kind of like a throw in to justify the shipping. I cleaned out a Tostito's Salsa can that I pour some in while I work. Large open top allows me to dip the patches with no fuss. Outers foaming bore cleaner on the ride home, one patch of hoppes, one patch of windex, dry patches, patch of hoppes, dry patch to make sure it's clean, patch with light oil. Been doing it this way since I've gotten my rifles and the bore's are still as bright as I can remember. Only one time I've actually ever soaked anything and that was my Mosin. The front part of the bolt was caked with Cosmo, soaked that overnight and was more like trying to take off Wax then Tar.

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