Storing a Cocked Glock


PDA






GoBrush
March 12, 2007, 10:53 PM
Just bought a Model 34 but don't know alot about Glock.

Can you safely store a Cocked Glock for extended periods of time? When I say safely I mean with out damaging the Glock.

If you enjoyed reading about "Storing a Cocked Glock" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
GreenFurniture
March 12, 2007, 11:00 PM
Yes.

waynedm
March 12, 2007, 11:11 PM
The striker is under maybe 20% of spring tension while cocked (unlike the other polymers!), don't worry about it.

g5reality
March 13, 2007, 12:19 AM
Yes No Problem. You can abuse it alot more than that.

http://www.theprepared.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=90&Item

bluetopper
March 13, 2007, 09:10 AM
Just make sure the safety is on, especially with children around.:uhoh:

Shipwreck
March 13, 2007, 09:29 AM
No worries dude. Enjoy the gun - don't worry about that.

RNB65
March 13, 2007, 09:45 AM
Just make sure the safety is on, especially with children around.

What safety? Glocks have no manual safety.

waynedm
March 13, 2007, 10:14 AM
I was like what the hell when I read that, too. I assume he means trigger lock?

Glock'N'Load
March 13, 2007, 12:13 PM
I think It was a joke. it is a good idea to rotate out your ammo to prevent corrosion of the ammo. A glock is industructable. you could store it loaded burried in the dirt frozen by winter dig it up and shoot it

GunNut
March 13, 2007, 01:32 PM
Definitely safe and how it was designed to be used.

Just make sure to store it in a holster that covers the trigger guard.

Ala Dan
March 13, 2007, 03:48 PM
Yep, very carefully~! :scrutiny: ;)

CountGlockula
March 13, 2007, 05:06 PM
Yes.

Glocks will last as long as the new advanced alien dinosaurs roam the earth.

Black Majik
March 13, 2007, 06:56 PM
The striker is under maybe 20% of spring tension while cocked (unlike the other polymers!), don't worry about it.

For the OP, I'd also like to add, no matter how much tension/compression of the spring while the striker is cocked, a spring will not wear out at it's static state.

You can keep the gun chambered for decades and it'll still probably fire.

10-Ring
March 13, 2007, 09:02 PM
I sure hope so, my G19 has been serving extended home defense duty in the night stand for a while now :scrutiny:

Glockman17366
March 14, 2007, 04:55 AM
Can you...yes!
Should you? Well, I don't keep one in the chamber unless I'm carrying it. It doesn't take that long or effort to rack the slide.
My reason is the Glocks do not have a magazine disconnect. When you eject the mag, the gun is still capable of firing if there is a round in the chamber. To me, that's an AD or ND waiting to happen.

I own two Glocks (17 and a 19) and Glock is my favorite hand gun, so I'm not bashing. This is strictly a safety issue to me.

RCR29
March 14, 2007, 05:02 AM
how long does it take? not long, but if something would happen, I would like to have that time to take action, rather than having to worry about racking the slide on the gun. Also, why add another step into the equation? If something is going to go wrong, it will happen when loading. Not a big chance, but a chance nonetheless.

Master Blaster
March 14, 2007, 09:52 AM
What ever you do dont put a trigger lock on a loaded cocked Glock!!!!!

Since you are not familiar with firearms make sure you get a lock box to store it in when you are not keeping it at the ready. Do not leave it in a drawer loaded and unattended, especially if you have children.

I would also recommend that you read the entire manual and follow all of the safety recommendations contained there in. Also seek out a hand gun safety class in your area, preferably an NRA safety class.:)

guitararmy
March 14, 2007, 01:34 PM
Some would argue that if you are disoriented from being woken up by a BG,
it might be a good idea to have to cock the Glock instead of grabbing it cocked while not all awake...

ny32182
March 14, 2007, 01:43 PM
My reason is the Glocks do not have a magazine disconnect. When you eject the mag, the gun is still capable of firing if there is a round in the chamber. To me, that's an AD or ND waiting to happen.

How is that a safety issue? Plenty of handguns don't have magazine disconnects. Only one of mine does have one, and I wish it didn't...

whited
March 14, 2007, 01:44 PM
I'd keep the mag out and the chamber empty, and store a loaded mag in
a hidden (but handy) location until needed.

I don't fancy the idea of having a loaded and chambered gun lying about,
unless its very well hidden.

GeorgiaGlocker
March 14, 2007, 05:16 PM
Just unchamber the Glock.

Mandirigma
March 14, 2007, 05:51 PM
Glockman17366>To me, that's an AD or ND waiting to happen.

guitararmy>it might be a good idea to have to cock the Glock instead of grabbing it cocked while not all awake...


Boogerhook off the bang switch....AKA Rule #3

todd740
March 14, 2007, 05:59 PM
boogerhook....:p :p :D :D

waynedm
March 14, 2007, 07:14 PM
Boogerhook off the bang switch....AKA Rule #3

Yeah! Like I'm da only one in this room professunal enuf to handal this Glack fo-dee.

PhillyGlocker
March 14, 2007, 07:52 PM
If you are in the habit of performing saftery procedures with guns, a Glock is no more dangerous than another. If you leave a gun unattended and a kid finds it, it's your fault, not the gun's. I'm in the habit of racking the slide 3 times to make absolutely sure there is no round in the chamber. A visual inspection as well seals the deal. Get in the habit of checking your weapon, and you'll never have to worry about an ND or AD.

Mandirigma
March 14, 2007, 07:54 PM
waynedm, Yeah I recall that video, it was a lesson in breaking all four rules :cool: Good thing he got himself rather than one of the other people in the room.

PhillyGlocker, thats what a press check is for :)

atblis
March 14, 2007, 10:39 PM
If you are worried about what some might call "creep" or perhaps taking a "set", don't worry.

If a spring is actually made of real spring material and is used inside its acceptable operating range (not compressed or stretched too much), it will not take a set in your lifetime (practically never actually). Same goes for mag springs.

10mm Megastar
March 14, 2007, 11:56 PM
Get a "Trigger Block" . I bought one for my g-17. Its adjustable and fits behind the trigger. It pushes out as you get ready to fire. I practiced with it many times and it doesnt add more than .01 to your first shot. A lot of people dont like them, but if your new to glock , i say its a good use of 10 bucks.

http://www.securityandsafetysupply.com/products-duty-gear/clip-2.html

check it out...

gezzer
March 15, 2007, 12:20 AM
What ever you do dont put a trigger lock on a loaded cocked Glock!!!!!

Never put a trigger lock on any loaded firearm!!!! :banghead: :banghead: :banghead:

When you can not train yourself to keep your finger of the Glock’s trigger, don't use a Glock or a DA revolver or DAO semi.

Black Majik
March 15, 2007, 02:23 AM
When you can not train yourself to keep your finger of the Glock’s trigger, don't use a Glock or a DA revolver or DAO semi.

If the person can't train to keep the finger off the trigger, that person shouldn't use any gun.

SwampWolf
March 15, 2007, 06:50 PM
I don't know about Glock but because after the slide is worked to the rear and the hammer is set against the sear (the hammer being under tension by the mainspring), HK recommends that the "pistol (the model P2000) be cleared and the hammer dropped on an empty chamber prior to placing the pistol in long-term storage." A reviewer of this pistol notes, "This is probably a very good idea, as it is not advisable to place any device in long-term storage with springs under tension." I wrote a letter to HK requesting an explanation as to what they meant by "long-term" and the reply I received was sort of a canned response, reiterating the need to "deactivate" the pistol when storing it for long periods of time.

If you enjoyed reading about "Storing a Cocked Glock" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!