Give Us Back Our Gun Law


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gunsmith
March 18, 2007, 07:28 PM
:barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf: :barf:
http://www.sltrib.com/opinion/ci_5445445


Give Us Back Our Gun Law:uhoh:
By Cathy Lanier and Vincent Schiraldi
2007, The Washington Post
Article Last Updated: 03/15/2007 07:55:58 PM MDT

As lawyers in guarded courtrooms debate whether it is a good idea to preserve tough gun control in the District of Columbia, in the real world of the city's juvenile justice system, the jury is in. There is no single solution to the problems of youth crime, but strong gun control laws such as the one struck down last week by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit clearly make a difference.
The public needs to understand that young people get their hands on guns differently than adults do - mainly by borrowing them from family members and friends or by buying them on the black market, according to a Justice Department study.
Back in 1995, the number of juveniles arrested for homicides in the District peaked at an alarming 14. Juvenile homicides peaked nationally about that time; in fact, between 1984 and 1994, homicides committed by juveniles increased threefold nationally. During that period, juvenile homicides involving handguns increased fourfold, while juvenile homicides in which handguns were not a factor remained unchanged.
Confronted with data such as these confirming the link between access to handguns and youth homicides, federal, state and local governments took action. In 1995, Congress made it a federal offense for juveniles to possess handguns. Jurisdictions around the country passed gun control ordinances and stepped up law enforcement efforts; Boston's Operation Night Light, for
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instance, made a priority of keeping guns out of the hands of children.
In 1995 the District of Columbia already had one of the nation's toughest gun control laws, forbidding handgun possession in the home. This is the provision the appeals court recently overturned. But handguns still flowed easily into D.C. from neighboring states, fueling black-market sales and hampering the effectiveness of the city's in-home ban.
In 1995 and 1997 laws enacted in, respectively, Virginia and Maryland prohibited citizens from purchasing more than one gun per month, dramatically reducing illegal gun sales as supply was choked off. The number of handguns coming into Washington from those states fell immediately after the laws were passed. Before Virginia passed its law, it was the No. 1 supplier of guns seized in crimes in Washington. Once Virginia's law took effect, Maryland became the largest source of guns seized in D.C. crimes. In the year after Maryland passed its one-gun-a-month law, the number of Maryland guns seized in Washington dropped from 20 to zero.
These bans on multiple gun sales in neighboring states choked off black-market sales, while the D.C. ban on guns in the home reduced the ability of youths to borrow guns from family and friends. The result? The number of juveniles charged with homicide in the District fell 86 percent from 1995 to 2006. In 1995, 14 of the 227 people charged with a homicide in the District, or 6 percent, were juveniles. Last year, only two out of 106 people (fewer than 2 percent) charged with homicides in the District were juveniles. Because easy access to cheap handguns disproportionately jeopardizes D.C. youths, laws that restrict such access disproportionately benefit youths.
No single factor can account for this substantial decline in homicides by D.C. juveniles. But to deny the impact of serious gun control laws and put guns back into children's homes would be misguided and dangerous. We hope the courts give us back an important tool to protect the safety of our youths and the residents of Washington.
---
Lanier is acting chief of the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department. Schiraldi is director of the D.C. Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services.

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ptmmatssc
March 18, 2007, 07:34 PM
D.C. gun laws = high crime rate . they can contest it all they want and try to blame guns from out of state , but truth be told , armed citizens tend to not be victims and criminals tend to shy away from attacking a person when there is a good possibility they are armed . Guess their reasoning skills were tossed out with their common sense . :rolleyes:

Bartholomew Roberts
March 18, 2007, 07:35 PM
Back in 1995, the number of juveniles arrested for homicides in the District peaked at an alarming 14.

You mean 19 years after this "important" law in question was passed?

Vern Humphrey
March 18, 2007, 07:39 PM
There is no single solution to the problems of youth crime, but strong gun control laws such as the one struck down last week by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit clearly make a difference.

She's right, you know. If not for D.C.'s "strong gun control laws" the criminals would have to worry that their victims might be armed, and that might curtail their activities to some degree.:banghead:

shield20
March 18, 2007, 07:42 PM
Chief Cathy Lanier:

In 1995 and 1997 laws enacted in, respectively, Virginia and Maryland prohibited citizens from purchasing more than one gun per month, dramatically reducing illegal gun sales as supply was choked off. The number of handguns coming into Washington from those states fell immediately after the laws were passed. Before Virginia passed its law, it was the No. 1 supplier of guns seized in crimes in Washington. Once Virginia's law took effect, Maryland became the largest source of guns seized in D.C. crimes. In the year after Maryland passed its one-gun-a-month law, the number of Maryland guns seized in Washington dropped from 20 to zero.
These bans on multiple gun sales in neighboring states choked off black-market sales, while the D.C. ban on guns in the home reduced the ability of youths to borrow guns from family and friends..


Then of course there was this:


District slayings usually with gun
By Matthew Cella
THE WASHINGTON TIMES
November 17, 2006

Washington D.C. Metro Police Chief Charles Ramsey Mary F. Calvert (THE WASHINGTON TIMES)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chief Ramsey agreed.
"We have tough gun laws, but most of our guns are coming from Virginia and Maryland," he said.


2 Chiefs, 2 stories 4 months apart - wonder which, (IF EITHER) is the truth???

Which is it Chief?? Or is this all just more anti-gun rhetoric, since WE KNOW DC gun laws do NOTHING to help decrease crime rates.

.cheese.
March 18, 2007, 08:21 PM
Lanier doesn't belong in her current position IMO.

Vern Humphrey
March 18, 2007, 08:44 PM
Lanier doesn't belong in her current position IMO.

Name someone in D.C. government who does belong in their position!;)

While you're at it, riddle me this:

United States Constitution, Article I, Clause 17: To exercise exclusive Legislation in all Cases whatsoever, over such District (not exceeding ten Miles square) as may, by Cession of particular States, and the Acceptance of Congress, become the Seat of the Government of the United States, and to exercise like Authority over all Places purchased by the Consent of the Legislature of the State in which the Same shall be, for the Erection of Forts, Magazines, Arsenals, dock-Yards, and other needful Buildings;--

Now, in the case of the Line Item Veto, the Court ruled that Congress cannot give away any of its power, and overturned the line item veto law.

How is it Congress can give away its power to the DC government?

xd9fan
March 19, 2007, 01:16 AM
who is forcing you to protect yourself?????? If you want to be a sheep..please go forth....

jeffkirchner
March 19, 2007, 02:15 AM
Irrational Ramblings from a paranoid D.C. subject (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kd-friedman/let-them-shoot-guns_b_43483.html)

Soybomb
March 19, 2007, 03:28 AM
Irrational Ramblings from a paranoid D.C. subject

I quite like our handgun ban and sleep a little bit more restfully every night knowing that my neighbors can't keep loaded guns under their pillows. *snip* Yup, let millions of people keep and hold handguns so a city that already has a devastatingly high homicide rate can get even worse.


The Citizens of Washington DC have spoken and we want the courts to stay out of our gun laws.
I always question the logic of doing the same ineffective thing over and over again. Plus the idea of a journalist suggesting that the constitution be disregarded for the sake of mob rule is just kind of sad.

pacodelahoya
March 19, 2007, 08:13 AM
Let's just pass out assault weapons on every corner, or at baseball games with the peanuts. That's what the NRA wants. The right for all people to carry whatever firearm they wish--


That right there is a vey good idea!:D

El Tejon
March 19, 2007, 08:31 AM
Give us back our Constitution.

ZeSpectre
March 19, 2007, 11:43 AM
It's fun reading the comments to that article.
Can be found here... Washington Post (http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/comments/display?contentID=AR2007031402186).

Just a few samples for those of you who don't want to go to the post site...

So the gun ban was enacted in 1976 but juvenile homicides continued to grow and grew fourfold between 1984 and 1995. Using their simplistic logic I could say that the gun ban contributed to the growth in juvenile homicide. Note also they refer to juveniles charged with homicide how many unsolved homicides are juveniles resposnible for? Could be that juveniles are just easier to catch. Of course the kicker that they fail to mention is: if access to guns is a cause for crime what is the homicide rate, adult and juvenile, in MD and VA? I think we can safely conclude that gun bans cause crime.


The argument here is illogical and deceptive. You purport to address the DC handgun ban that was recently struck down, and then change the topic to laws in Virginia and Maryland. The DC handgun ban dates back to the 1970s, and thus has nothing to do with a peak in juvenile murder in 1995. What is worth noting is that violent crime in DC decreased in the five years prior to the 70s handgun ban, and increased in the five years subsequent to the ban. DC has the most restrictive gun control in the nation, and is consequently the most dangerous city in America. The gun ban did criminals a favor by insuring that victims will be disarmed, even in their own homes. As seen in DC, criminals intent on committing murder, rape, assault, or burglary are unconcerned with secondary gun control regulations. The peak in juvenile murder in 1995 is more likely related to a peak in total violent crime nationwide around that time. Since 1993 violent crime has nationwide has been decreasing, and is now at a 30-year-low. Crime in DC has decreased with the rest of the nation, but still remains much higher than most other places in the country because of the absolute inability of citizens to effectively protect themselves.

and so forth.

Flyboy
March 19, 2007, 01:04 PM
Give Us Back Our Gun Law
This Constitution, and the Laws of the United States which shall be made in Pursuance thereof; and all Treaties made, or which shall be made, under the authority of the United States, shall be the supreme Law of the land; and the Judges in every State shall be bound thereby, any Thing in the Constitution or Laws of any State to the Contrary notwithstanding.
We did.

xd9fan
March 19, 2007, 05:23 PM
Quote:
Let's just pass out assault weapons on every corner, or at baseball games with the peanuts. That's what the NRA wants. The right for all people to carry whatever firearm they wish--

That right there is a vey good idea!

sounds like REAL homeland security to me.....

gunsmith
March 19, 2007, 11:24 PM
oops cap lock, but anyway, I can't comment and I have always strived to be concise and erudite

Master Blaster
March 20, 2007, 09:46 AM
How stupid can they be??

Drugs Cocaine Marijuana are illegal in every state, and yet they are easily availible on the Streets of Washington DC. They have been Illegal since 1919.
Where there is demand for an illegal product there will always be an ample supply. If guns were outlawed in every state, and some how we could magically secure our borders so they copuldnt be imported, some enterprising criminal would by a milling machine, and start making guns in their basement.

The problem is the criminals, they just don't follow laws. The courts give them chance after chance, and they throw the chance away because robbing killing and drug dealing is all they know, its the culture they have grown up in.
The problem is lack of values and supervision, I work in juvenile justice, and I see this first hand. No values taught at home = career criminal. And we are seeing them younger and younger, 11 12 year old armed robbers. Girls now too.

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