Cylinder End Shake Bearings


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MR.G
June 11, 2003, 12:43 PM
Can more than one cylinder end shake bearing be used in a gun ?
I wasn't sure if stacking them was a good idea. I only have .002 bearings, and .004 is needed, and really don't want to order another size unless necessary.

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Traveler
June 11, 2003, 01:51 PM
Stacking the bearings is not a problem.

In my experience the biggest problem with the uninitiated using them is that they do not face off the end of the yoke and the inside face of the cylinder. This must be done to do the job correctly. Failure to do these steps can lead to binding, and excessive wear on the thin bearings, which can then deform or tear and bind up the action.

Most revolvers that I have examined do not have square ends on the yoke, and a fair number also lack square faces inside the cylinder where the yoke (and bushings) sit.

Lack of a square contact can affect trigger pull (which becomes uneven from chamber to chamber), accuracy (as the bores will not be aligned square), and cylinder play (because the force of recoil will peen one (high) point and batter it down much quicker than a square face).

bountyhunter
June 12, 2003, 04:42 PM
Traveler is right about the big no-no: make sure you get the inside surface of the cylinder face flat. On mine, the end of the yoke tube wore a groove into the face of the cylinder (about .003" deep). So, I measured the end shake as .003" and figured I could just drop in an .002" washer.

WRONG. After I put in one washer, it was binding severely and the washer was deformed when I took it out. The groove in the cylinder face matches the outline of the tube end. The washers have the same OUTSIDE diameter as the crane tube, but go farther in on the inside diameter. So, the washers didn't "fit" into the groove and the whole assy siezed up when put back together.

Bottom line, make sure the inside of the cylinder where the crane tube end rides is smoothed and flat before fitting a washer. Then, they will work perfectly.

MR.G
June 12, 2003, 05:13 PM
What did you use to smooth, or flatten, the inside of the cylinder ?

MR.G
June 12, 2003, 09:46 PM
I looked through the S&W shop manual and can't find anything about polishing the inside of the cylinder or the crane tube. There must be something that will fit properly in the cylinder th polish out the groove.

bountyhunter
June 13, 2003, 01:57 PM
"I looked through the S&W shop manual and can't find anything about polishing the inside of the cylinder or the crane tube. There must be something that will fit properly in the cylinder th polish out the groove."

I never found the tool either. Make one out of a hand drill shank (smooth end) sized to just barely go in the cylinder. Attach some 180# sandpaper to the flat end with sticky tape and spin by hand. Finish with fine paper once the surface is flat.

I never found it necessary to refinish the end of the crane tube on mine.

Speaking of Brownells: they do sell the swaging tool which can be used to "stretch" the crane tube and eliminate end shake. I haven't tried it.

MR.G
June 13, 2003, 02:12 PM
Got the bearings in the mail today, and put one in my old model 66. No more problem. Tightened it right up. I used the drill bit end and sandpaper, as you suggested, to smooth the inside of the cylonder. It appears that installing a bearing is better than streaching the yoke. The bearing is harder, and has more contact surface.

bountyhunter
June 13, 2003, 05:14 PM
"It appears that installing a bearing is better than streaching the yoke. The bearing is harder, and has more contact surface."

Correct. It is made of steel that is harder and slicker than the gun stainless. More important, it acts as a "buffer" between the two stainless parts that were rubbing on each other. In the guns I put washers in, end shake progression basically stopped dead. SW disagrees, but I think the washers are better than crane stretching because they fix it for good.

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