An article about "Increase of woman who own handgun"


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CK
April 1, 2007, 02:39 PM
From San Francisco none the less.

http://www.insidebayarea.com/sanmateocountytimes/ci_5555670
(http://www.insidebayarea.com/sanmateocountytimes/ci_5555670)
ARMED and FEMALE
Women with guns a growing phenomenon
By Christine Morente, STAFF WRITER
Article Last Updated: 03/31/2007 12:15:56 PM PDT



SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO - KIMBERLY SHRUM grips a Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum revolver and aims at a target 25 yards away.

Bang.

A hot shell casing hits the floor, joining hundreds of others littering the concrete at Jackson Arms Indoor Shooting Range in South San Francisco.

Shrum centers herself and aims again.

Bang.

After two days using her new revolver, Shrum's hands are sore from the recoil of every shot.

"I get that rush and power from a Magnum," said the 36-year-old Millbrae resident. "I've taken archery and thrown darts, but shooting is another way to hurl something through the air. But this is just like shooting a paper ball into the trash can. TwoPoints. Air ball."

She is among a growing number of women who are showing up at shooting ranges across the country. Many women who visit the Jackson Arms shooting gallery do it because they love the power of guns and want to learn how to protect themselves.

While there are no hard figures on the number of women who own guns, it's estimated that nationwide 11 million to 17 million women wield firearms, said Laura Browder, author of "Her Best Shot: Women and Guns in America." The National Rifle Association doesn't keep figures by gender.

Browder said the gun industry is just as focused on females as it has been over the last 200 years, but the marketing strategy now taps into their fears.

"The gun industry is saying, 'Look, the state is not here to protect you, the cops are
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not here, no one is looking out for you,'" said Browder, who is assistant professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University. "There's a lot of single mothers, and there's a lot of suggestion there is no man in the house, and the woman has got to take care of herself."

That's a far cry from earlier ads that depict women as rifle-toting cowgirls and snarling buxom blondes cradling a machine gun. Meanwhile, women such as Annie Oakley, Bonnie Parker — as in "Bonnie and Clyde" — and Patty Hearst are still revered as armed female icons.

But Browder adds that women fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan are adding a more sobering image of women and guns.

"Many, many women are in combat and coming home wounded," Browder said. "Women with guns will seem less exotic than they once did."

Liza Normandy, a certified NRA firearm instructor at Jackson Arms, teaches women to properly shoot guns. Classes cost $50.

She said she would like to have more female shooters come in. To attract the group, Jackson Arms offers Ladies Night on Mondays. The cost of a lane for an hour is $7 instead of the regular $14 price.

Those who practice in the gallery are largely either police cadets or women who accompany their boyfriends or husbands.

Normandy has been shooting on and off for 16 years. She and her husband — they met on Lane 7 at Jackson Arms — are very passionate about the recreational sport.

"Shooting is like any hobby as bowling or golf," Normandy said. "It's a great way to release aggression."

Range Master Leo Manalo also teaches ladies' classes. One day, he taught a grandmother and her two granddaughters.

"Women get into shooting just like the guys do," he said. "Because it's like a mini-vacation. It's a lot cheaper than seeing a therapist. It's relaxing."

To own a firearm in California, you need to show proof of residency within the state, and pass a 30-question test to get a handgun-safety certificate. The waiting period is 10 days.

Kimberly Shrum bought her Magnum revolver on Sunday, after shooting for three months. Her father, an ex-Marine, taught her how to handle a .45-caliber semi-automatic pistol.

She said she's addicted to the power.

"Once you hold the gun in your hand and channel the power right where you want it, it's such a rush," said Shrum, who is an office manager for a financial services company in San Bruno. "But I will never get comfortable with a handgun."

Sabrina Watts, 24, is a cadet at the College of San Mateo's Police Academy. The Redwood City resident was practicing at Jackson Arms with a fellow cadet on Monday. Both used to be officers for the Peninsula Humane Society.

Watts calls herself a good shooter, but needs to stop anticipating the bang, which throws off her aim. She started shooting when she was 9 years old and learned that "guns are fun."

Watts, who plans to eventually become a police officer, believes a woman should arm herself.

"Regardless of how strong you are, a man can overpower you," she said. "If you need to protect your home, you have to do what you have to do."

Maybe she does not understand too much about gun yet,

KIMBERLY SHRUM grips a Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum revolver and aims at a target 25 yards away.

Bang.

A hot shell casing hits the floor

But, her articles read to be sort of pro gun owner to me. With the exception of comment from Browder. But, try read the "comments" on the article. She is being slammed for not knowing enough about firearms. Not sure if the one who call her an "idiot" in the comment section is a gun owner.

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bogie
April 1, 2007, 02:45 PM
I suspect that the repressive journalist is trying to disempower her.

Progressive women like Ms. Shrum need to be encouraged in their activities.

Hawk
April 1, 2007, 04:30 PM
...grips a Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum revolver and aims at a target 25 yards away.

Bang.

A hot shell casing hits the floor

I hate getting hit in the head from hot revolver brass.

Anyhow, good for Kimberly.

cheygriz
April 1, 2007, 05:47 PM
At least there are a few journalists starting to emerge that have enough integrity to try to tell both sides of a story even if they lack expertise.

While expertise is great, integrity is more important.

El Tejon
April 1, 2007, 05:50 PM
Self-loading revovlers? Are those California legal?:uhoh: :D

Are we sure that any of this actually happened? Journalists make stories up out of whole cloth all the time.

Brass ejecting out of a revovler? Wow, if she really went to the range then wouldn't she at least get this part right?

I call Bearthread on this.

TexasRifleman
April 1, 2007, 06:19 PM
I call Bearthread on this.

Doesn't matter. The media is all Bearthread anyway so might as well see some on our side for once rather than always against us.

For a San Fran paper this is about as Pro 2A as you could ask for.

And there is always a nugget of truth, even in the worst written articles.

"Regardless of how strong you are, a man can overpower you," she said. "If you need to protect your home, you have to do what you have to do."

Scanr
April 1, 2007, 07:20 PM
Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum revolver

Bang.

A hot shell casing hits the floor, joining hundreds of others littering the concrete at Jackson Arms Indoor Shooting Range in South San Francisco.


Since when does a revolver eject brass when it fires?:what: :banghead:

bogie
April 1, 2007, 07:55 PM
Since a relatively ignorant reporter wrote the story...

Now, I can see us doing a coupla different things here - we can write the nice reporter about the cool story she wrote, or we can attack her because she doesn't know a revolver from a semi-auto. One of these actions will keep her, more or less, on our side. The other will pretty much guarantee that she'll start to think we're a bunch of loonies who shouldn't even be allowed bb guns...

Sad thing is that I think I know which option most gun nuts would opt for... Sigh...

Damien45
April 1, 2007, 08:27 PM
This was my posted comment:

Comment Successfully Posted

Excellent article. I will not bash the context of the revolver and spent casing. I have shot at an indoor range and know full well that casings from adjacent lanes can fly into my area. We were not there to know if that is the case or if there was "artistic license" used. Doesn't matter. What does matter is the point of the article. Women, and anti-gun people in general, need to realize that arming yourself with the intention of defending yourself, or others, is necessary.

I noted that one comment said violence creates violence. To this I offer the correction, proper training and use of a firearm WILL stop the violence. Your comment refers to those who retaliate, usually after the fact. In a SD situation, violence is already occuring. Defending yourself is not a creation of violence as a result, as the violence was already there.

Additionally, I ask this, if someone broke into your home and you became Mr. Compliant, what would you allow the violent criminal to do? Will you let him rape your wife? Children? While you are trying to talk him out of harming you and your family, you would do nothing else? That is your choice, as given by the Constitution of the United States of America. I will fight back to protect my loved ones as well as my self. That is my right, as given by the Constitution of the United States of America.

Again I say excellent article. Thank you for your courage to publish it. My hat is off to you.

Soybomb
April 1, 2007, 09:21 PM
but the marketing strategy now taps into their fears.

"The gun industry is saying, 'Look, the state is not here to protect you, the cops are not here, no one is looking out for you,'" said Browder, who is assistant professor of English at Virginia Commonwealth University. "There's a lot of single mothers, and there's a lot of suggestion there is no man in the house, and the woman has got to take care of herself."
I guess I don't see how thats playing off fears as much as a reminder of the reality of life....would it be better to create a false sense of security?

Kali Endgame
April 1, 2007, 09:42 PM
"Shooting is like any hobby as bowling or golf," Normandy said. "It's a great way to release aggression."

Thanks, buddy, now we are a bunch of agressive people who are about to snap. What happened to the skill aspect of shooting? Tension would have been a better choice of words to describe the healing powers of shooting.

DWARREN123
April 2, 2007, 12:21 AM
One of them new semi auto revolvers!

mordechaianiliewicz
April 2, 2007, 01:06 AM
I'm just happy this article happened. While it may have a few anti biases, I'm happy more women in the Bay Area are getting handguns. That's the good thing. Let's focus on good. Expand it instead of criticizing it.

Tinmancr
April 2, 2007, 02:42 AM
Chicks with guns sounds good to me.
Keep the compensating macho bastages inline.
I am a firm supporter of women rights "especially when they are hot" the rights not just the chicks.
Can anyone remember Annie Oakley I know my accuracy isn't that good even with a .22

bogie
April 2, 2007, 02:52 AM
Oh, but we remembers the publicity hungry woman... Yesss, we do...

Ahhh... I long for the days of exhibition shooting... I betcha I could take some money from her descendants...

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