Can't cock hammer on single six


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quatin
April 5, 2007, 11:31 PM
I just bought an used Ruger NM Single Six. I've noticed a curious characteristic. I can't cock the hammer if the barrel is pointed downwards. I have to point the barrel above level to cock the hammer. What seems to be happening is that the transfer bar is loose. When the barrel is pointed downwards and I cock the hammer the transfer bar moves up, but gets stuck on the back of the firing pin. When the barrel is pointed upwards, the transfer bar hangs back a bit and clears the firing pin. Is this normal? If not how do I fix it? I took it to the range today and it shot fine.

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Onty
April 5, 2007, 11:52 PM
Pull out cylinder pin and check the plunger at the aft end. It should be sticking out under spring pressure. Press it, it should go in. When you release the pressure, spring should push it out. If that doesn’t happen or return is incomplete, there is dirt inside hole, or spring is weak or broken.

quatin
April 5, 2007, 11:55 PM
good call, I was careless. The piston wasn't all the way in. It cocks just fine now. Thx.

Also, is it true you can dry fire the NM single six without any harm? It has a separate firing pin instead of the hammer striking the round.

bakert
April 6, 2007, 02:39 AM
Also if the base pin isn't all the way in the transfer bar can hang on the firing pin as it moves up.

Logan5
April 6, 2007, 02:49 AM
Also, is it true you can dry fire the NM single six without any harm? It has a separate firing pin instead of the hammer striking the round.

As with most things in life, the answer is "It depends." You probably don't want to make a habit of dry firing them for practice (it's a .22LR, go shoot it!) but it's probably not going to be a problem.

Bullet Bob
April 6, 2007, 09:00 AM
According to Ruger, you can dry fire one with the transfer bar all you want. The biggest danger to rimfires is the firing pin peening the cylinder if the rim of the cartridge isn't there, but Ruger has an internal stop that prevents overtravel of the firing pin. That said, I've never owned one long enough to dry fire it extensively myself.

Onty
April 6, 2007, 12:19 PM
According to Ruger, you can dry fire one with the transfer bar all you want.


NO, in my opinion and experience. I manage to break it by dry firing and had seen another NMBH with replaced transfer bar. From now on, dry firing with snap caps ONLY. After spending hundreds of dollars on revolvers, you should get them, they are dirt cheap insurance.

FYI, regarding transfer bars, I always have a spare ones, they are polished (I was able to get stainless only at that time), ready to be installed. By polishing them you prolong their fatigue life span and makes action smoother. BTW, when you receive them, make sure that they are for proper frame size. Ask me how I learned that lesson...

One interesting tip; according to a long time gunsmith (Iowegan, if I remembered correctly) the most trouble free revolver ever made is Ruger OMBH three screw.

Good call, I was careless. The piston wasn't all the way in. It cocks just fine now. Thx.

Any time I assembly my SA revolvers, I make sure that cylinder pin is all the way in and PRESS cylinder latch, to make sure it snaps in its place. Never had loose pin flying forward and I was shooting occasionally 325 SWC at close to 1200 fps from my Bisley 45. Periodically check all screws, they do get loose. Use proper screwdrivers or bits. Make sure that they are proper size and of professional quality. Too many of those so called “gunsmith” ones are cheap crap. If you shoot any heavy recoiling large frame SA, put few droplets of heavy oil (STP is a good one) on both ends of cylinder. It will prevent battering between cylinder and frame during heavier recoil.

Good shooting.

Ed Meinel
April 6, 2007, 01:47 PM
Too many pronouns, not enough nouns... Could you please clarify?

NO, in my opinion and experience. I manage to break it by dry firing and had seen another NMBH with replaced transfer bar. From now on, dry firing with snap caps ONLY. After spending hundreds of dollars on revolvers, you should get them snap caps or transfer bar?, they snap caps or transfer bar? are dirt cheap insurance. FYI, I always have a spare ones snap caps or transfer bar?, they snap caps or transfer bar? are polished (I was able to get stainless only at that time), ready to be installed. By polishing them snap caps or transfer bar? you prolong their snap caps or transfer bar? fatigue life span and makes action smoother. BTW, when you receive them snap caps or transfer bar?, make sure that they are for proper frame size. Ask me how I learned that lesson...

quatin
April 6, 2007, 03:34 PM
About dry firing. What if you were to use empty shell casings instead? Obviously with enough tries the dent would deepen, but if you were to only dry fire an empty shell 2-3 times before throwing it away?

Onty
April 7, 2007, 12:50 AM
Too many pronouns, not enough nouns... Could you please clarify?

Sorry for inaccuracy, I was in rush to get out. See corrected text above. Regards.

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