Trimming pistol rounds


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JAG2955
April 11, 2007, 12:38 AM
So I believe that somewhere I read you don't need to trim pistol rounds after only one firing. Is this correct?

A related question is that if my case is slightly longer, should I adjust the recommended OAL to reflect the lengthened case, or just keep the OAL the same?

I've just reloaded my first nine rounds ever, and it appears that the LSWC could be seated slightly less deep, but then it would lengthen the OAL.

Thoughts?

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Sunray
April 11, 2007, 12:46 AM
yep. Most pistol cases don't stretch much. Especially after only one firing. Doesn't hurt to check 'em though.
"...adjust the recommended OAL..." No. Trim the cases so they're all the same length. Especially for semi-auto brass. With other brass, different length cases will give you loaded ammo with a different OAL for each loaded round.

jr81452
April 11, 2007, 12:51 AM
case length does not effect oal at all unless you are seating you bullets flush with the case mouth (can't see why you would). as for pistol case triming, as long as they chamber there is no need.

JAG2955
April 11, 2007, 01:06 AM
Thanks, guys!

Fixed my problem, and back to production.

CZ57
April 11, 2007, 01:13 AM
If someone finds it unnecessary I'll agree with them for their loads. If someone wants to trim, I'll agree with that too. Truth is, sometimes I don't have time. When I do, I trim when cases are new because any stretching that occurs will be fairly uniform if cases were trimmed while new. And, it is not likely that they'll become too long unless they were to close to max. length when they were new, and that can happen. One situation where trimming is mandatory for me, is when building Magnum revolver rounds that might be used for game. When testing them, I want to know I've done everything possible to ensure accuracy of the round. If cases vary in length, your crimp will vary somewhat in tension. Maybe its nitpicken' but the results I get are worth the effort!;)

RustyFN
April 11, 2007, 07:52 AM
I don't trim pistol brass, doesn't matter how many times it has been fired.
Rusty

Walkalong
April 11, 2007, 09:35 AM
I never trim auto pistol rounds. With straight walled revolver rounds I size and then trim before I load them the first time for a consistent crimp and usually don't have to again.:)

The Bushmaster
April 11, 2007, 10:46 AM
Simple answer to a simple question...measure the cases...If you find one that is too long...Trim it.:rolleyes:

RustyFN
April 11, 2007, 01:18 PM
Thanks Walkalong, I don't own a revolver yet and thats a good point I will have to remember.
Rusty

jmorris
April 12, 2007, 10:27 AM
Purchase a case gauge it will let you know if your loaded rounds are out of specification. A taper crimp die will take care of any crimp issue; I prefer the Lee factory crimp die. FWIW Iíve reloaded tens of thousands of pistol rounds and never trimmed a single one.

cheygriz
April 12, 2007, 03:10 PM
Been loadin' pistol cases since 1965. Aint trimmed one yet!:neener:

mike240se
April 12, 2007, 08:05 PM
Purchase a case gauge it will let you know if your loaded rounds are out of specification. A taper crimp die will take care of any crimp issue; I prefer the Lee factory crimp die. FWIW Iíve reloaded tens of thousands of pistol rounds and never trimmed a single one.


I read that with the lee factory crimp die that the length of the case isnt as important as normal in their instructions.

when you use the that factory crimp die, how do you keep the seating die from crimping? you back it out a turn after setting it in the press? I havent done it before obviously :)

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