Anyone have any experience with a Redding T7 Turret Press?


PDA






DogBonz
April 18, 2007, 01:07 PM
Right now I load on a Rockchucker, but I am thinking of getting a turret press for loading the calibers that I shoot more of or more often, like 45, 38/357, and 223. I was looking at a few turret presses, and I like that I can get different heads for the RCBS. A lot of folks have had good things to say about the Lee turret, but it is only a 4 hole (not that you need more than 4 holes). But I have not found a lot of info on the Redding T7. From the looks of it though, it appears to be built like the proverbial brick out house.

So, does anyone have any experience with the T7? I know that is more expensive than the others, but is it better? Also, how accurate (repeatable) are the loads from turrets? Are they any less than those made on a single stage press?

Thanks for the help and info,

Fred

If you enjoyed reading about "Anyone have any experience with a Redding T7 Turret Press?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
DaveInFloweryBranchGA
April 18, 2007, 01:12 PM
"Right now I load on a Rockchucker, but I am thinking of getting a turret press for loading the calibers that I shoot more of or more often, like 45, 38/357, and 223. I was looking at a few turret presses, and I like that I can get different heads for the RCBS."

You can get different turrets for the Lee Classic cast as well and they're a lot less expensive per turret and much, much quicker to change out. So you can get one for each caliber.

"A lot of folks have had good things to say about the Lee turret, but it is only a 4 hole (not that you need more than 4 holes)."

Four is all you need to reload pistol or rifle. The extra holes aren't of any significant benefit in a turret press such as the Redding, RCBS or Lyman. 5 holds if of some benefit when you're reloading progressive, but not on a turret, where every operation is performed on a single case.

"But I have not found a lot of info on the Redding T7. From the looks of it though, it appears to be built like the proverbial brick out house."

It's not that well built. It's just made of cast iron. That turret design is actually pretty poor for reloading accuracy/runout compared to say, the Lee Classic Cast turret design.

"So, does anyone have any experience with the T7? I know that is more expensive than the others, but is it better? Also, how accurate (repeatable) are the loads from turrets? Are they any less than those made on a single stage press?"

They're not all that.

I've owned a Lyman T-Mag turret and having loaded on it, I've not found that style of reloading a significant advantage over a single stage. Frankly, were I you, based on the calibers you're reloading, I'd buy a Lee Classic turret press, which offers automatic advance and is more accurate as a reloading tool than ny of the older turret designs, such as the Redding you're looking at. I view the old style turret designs as obselete and very much over priced. While they're all cast iron and heavy, the designs are quite poor.

Here's an article going into detail and in it, you can see why you don't want the old style press and you do want the Lee Classic Turret press:

http://www.realguns.com/archives/122.htm

Regards,

Dave

DogBonz
April 18, 2007, 03:02 PM
Thats the kind of info that I was looking for.

Grumulkin
April 18, 2007, 04:32 PM
I made the transition from an RCBS Rockchucker to the Redding T-7 turret press a few months ago. I consider the T-7 excellent and am very satisfied with the purchase.

Unisaw
April 18, 2007, 05:16 PM
I reload two calibers: .45ACP and .357 magnum. I transitioned from a single-stage press to a T-7 about six months ago. With seven holes in the turret, I can leave all of the dies necessary for loading these two calibers permanently installed in the turret. I am extremely pleased with the T-7: it is rock solid, well made, and functions as intended.

Fatelvis
April 18, 2007, 06:00 PM
Ive used 2 Lee turret presses for 23 years of reloading, (I wore one out), and was pretty happy with thier performance. After reading Glen Zediker's book on accurate ammunition for competitive highpower shooting, I bought the Redding T7 to try to improve my loading, yet still enjoy the versatility of the turret style press. I can say the Redding press seems much better built, with tighter tolerances and less slop in movement. And after reading the articles pointed out from an above post, I can add one problem with Lees turret that was not addressed: The turrets, over time, become looser in the "crown retainer" than when new, creating slop in movement. That is what made me think the Redding can retain it's loading consistancy for a much longer time. (If the turret starts to get sloppy, tighten the retaining bolt, or replace it with a new one.) The mushroom style turret that the Redding uses, utilizes a "toch point" at the back of the frame, that the turret itself makes contact with, when under load. This limits any tipping of the turret to a miniscule amount.
I would buy the Redding.

DogBonz
April 19, 2007, 10:36 AM
I'm still doing my research, but keep the info comming.

ocabj
April 19, 2007, 11:13 AM
So, does anyone have any experience with the T7? I know that is more expensive than the others, but is it better? Also, how accurate (repeatable) are the loads from turrets? Are they any less than those made on a single stage press?

I have a T7 setup with 9mm and 45ACP dies. I still load rifle on my Rockchucker with Hornady Lock-n-Load conversion kit.

The T7 works fine for me for the two pistol cartridges I use.

cracked butt
April 19, 2007, 11:24 AM
If you want to load rounds very fast, the Lee Classic Turret is the way to go, its very fast comparatively speaking for rifle cartridges once you get it set up.

The Redding turret may or may not speed things up. It will probably give you more consistant results than the Lee, but it would function more or les as a single stage press with the exception that you don't have to srew out and screw in dies.

Handgunr
April 19, 2007, 11:41 AM
Dog,

In my opinion, a turret is the middle ground between the single stage's, and the progressives. I have all three, and also 3 of the Dillon progressives.
Currently, my turret press is an older Lyman T-Mag, and my single stage is an Orange Crusher of the same vintage.

Like I said, my 3 Dillon's are one converted RL450/to 550, one 550, purchased as, and one Square Deal B.
As all of the progressives are committed to specific loads I normally use, when I need something different than what they're set to load, I'd revert to the T-Mag turret.

I'm not a big Lee Precision guy, except for a couple of their tools, but that's just me and my personal preferences.

Of the turret presses available out there, RCBS, Lyman and Redding, are all of good quality.
That said, I'd give the Redding "the nod" for the top of the shelf.......and like I said, I own the Lyman.....so go figure.

If and when I replace either of my Lyman presses due to wear, (not that there's anything wrong with them), they'll be replaced with Reddings (T7 & UltraMag), because I agree, and know for a fact, that "they are" built like a brick sh*t house.

I'm hittin' 50 this June, and I've been loading since I was 11, so I've had a chance to taste several of the flavors.......you're on the right track DogBonz.


Take care,
Bob

Thirties
April 19, 2007, 12:27 PM
The Redding T-7 turret press is an excellent, durable, top-of-the-line reloading press. But, although you can buy spare heads for it, it is not intended to be used as a multiple-head-swapping press like the Lee Turret is.

If you want to store your dies in their own turret heads, the Lee turret presses are intended to be used that way.

I will add that the multiple turret head system is not any better or faster. I think Lees are built that way because they don't have a very positive locking system for their dies. Rubber o-rings compress and get old and brittle. While the Redding and most other dies employ a positive locking ring that allows you to swap dies on the one turret head without losing your settings.

So, you see, the Lee Turrets and the Redding Turret are used differently. Best advice is to take a hands-on look at both.

cracked butt
April 19, 2007, 01:25 PM
Rubber o-rings compress and get old and brittle. While the Redding and most other dies employ a positive locking ring that allows you to swap dies on the one turret head without losing your settings.


There are other advantages to O-ring locking rings that more than make up for the lack of a permanent setting. Unless a die is machined absolutely perfectly straight and square, the advantage of the O-ring is that it allows the die to 'give' a little and align itself when a piece of brass is forced into it. A more rigid setup with a less than absolutely perfect die will force the brass into a shape that isn't in perfect alignment. Another good place for O-rings is under the retaining nut for he expander ball for the exact same reasons.

I will add that the multiple turret head system is not any better or faster.
The Lee setup is very fast once you get a rythym down. I reloaded 50 8x57 and 40 6.5x55 cast loads with a changeover in between including the powder measure in less than an hour last week. I would have been lucky to reload 50 of either in an hour and a half on my rockchucker.

So, you see, the Lee Turrets and the Redding Turret are used differently
+1

Handgunr
April 19, 2007, 01:51 PM
Thirties,

Just a couple points of disagreement;

But, although you can buy spare heads for it, it is not intended to be used as a multiple-head-swapping press like the Lee Turret is.

In fact, yes it is. It's the main reason why you see Redding, Lyman & RCBS, all sell accessory turrets, and Lyman advertises the availability of extra turrets "for that reason" in their loading manuals.

If you want to store your dies in their own turret heads, the Lee turret presses are intended to be used that way.
I will add that the multiple turret head system is not any better or faster.

Again, turrets are designed for you to leave your dies "set up" and left in them, for the simple fact that they sell accessory one's. It's not because they break, or at least not often enough to advertise them like that anyway.
And like I said, Lyman even indicates (in their manuals) that they are sold for that purpose.

Lee, Lyman, Redding or RCBS......other than a difference in diameter, there's really no difference why the dies can't be left in them
Due to no center pivot point, the Lee Turret seems more of a toolhead than a turret, but that's a matter of opinion I guess.

As far as multiple turret heads not being any better or faster, it runs along the same lines as having a turret over a single stage press to begin with.

Where a single turret alone allows you to effortlessly turn from your sizing die position, to your case mouth belling die as a next step (pistol), without having to remove one and put in another, the replaceable turret allows you to change from one die set, or caliber, to another.

I can literally change out my T-Mag turrets in seconds. To change a die set out of the mounted turret, would take several minutes to get them in if they were already adjusted, and if they needed to be adjusted to the turret, then even longer.

fwiw.............

Take care,
Bob

snuffy
April 19, 2007, 02:55 PM
Where a single turret alone allows you to effortlessly turn from your sizing die position, to your case mouth belling die as a next step (pistol), without having to remove one and put in another, the replaceable turret allows you to change from one die set, or caliber, to another.

Yeah, BUT you do have to manually turn the turret each time you want to use the next die! With the lee, it's done for you on the down stroke of the ram. AND if you can "effortlessly turn the turret, it has to be loose to do it. The ONLY way to garauntee the turret does not deflect because of this loosness, is to tighten the center nut holding the turret to remove that flexing. All the turrets EXCEPT the lee, are "C" type of presses. Meaning that the front is open, no solid part of the press to stop deflection there.

I can literally change out my T-Mag turrets in seconds. To change a die set out of the mounted turret, would take several minutes to get them in if they were already adjusted, and if they needed to be adjusted to the turret, then even longer.

Same for the lee. The extra turrets are MUCH cheaper also. I'm NOT going to claim there's no slop in the fit of the lee turrets. BUT, it is the same each time! Without a dial indicator, you could not swap out a turret on a lyman, or other make turret press, to get the deflection the same each time you switched turrets. That translates into differences in sizing, expanding and belling and bullet seating and crimping.

Handgunr
April 19, 2007, 03:28 PM
Snuffy,

Then what you're saying is that the Lee is providing a progressive motion on the downstroke....in that case, yep, it'd be easier, if you want the machine to control that function.
Most turret's aren't made, or considered to have progressive functions.
Like I said in the beginning, they are a "middle ground" between single stage and progressive presses.

Regarding the changout on turrets....
BUT, it is the same each time! Without a dial indicator, you could not swap out a turret on a lyman, or other make turret press, to get the deflection the same each time you switched turrets. That translates into differences in sizing, expanding and belling and bullet seating and crimping

I can't speak specifically for the Redding or the RCBS, but your wrong when it comes to the Lyman T-Mags. They have a friction fit locking ring & shim setup that is totally repeatable.
As far as turret deflection, they are designed to operate that way intentionally. When you have full pressure on the ram they orient themselves 90 degrees with the center pin as they come in contact with the rear stub support. As far as any press goes, they all have slop designed into them to allow them to function. If they were as tight as many would like to profess, they'd have to be running on ball bearings.

Contact any of the companies that produce those turret presses and they'll gladly explain it. To produce a press that "goes out" of alignment at the point that precision is needed, just doesn't make sense, and that's not the way they're built.

Just because I don't personally perfer them, make no mistake, I'm not bashing Lee's in particular. I think they have their niche.

But, for me, and what I do, they just don't hold up very well.

Bob

judaspriest
April 19, 2007, 04:05 PM
I dont' have any experience with the T-Rex as they call it, but I've seen a huge array of universally-positive reviews on midwayusa.com (http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=588482) (always the first place I check for reviews)

Handgunr
April 19, 2007, 09:18 PM
JP,

I read the review on your link........

Out of all of them, there was one that had a little issue with the Redding. They're made up here in Cortland, NY, and I know a friend from Syracuse who had worked there for many years.
He always said that they weren't cheap, but that from making them over so many years, they were the best built press, hands down.

Apparently, reading the reviews, he was right.

It all depends if you want to shell out the cash, but seeing how they'll outlast most folks lifetimes, I'd think it'd be a good investment.
At 50, I'll be getting one.....looks like the kids will be loading on the same machine as well.

Take care,
Bob

DaveInFloweryBranchGA
April 20, 2007, 09:30 AM
Run out on all the old style turret presses is an issue. I got rid of my Lyman T-mag for this reason. The Lee, while it is a turret press, is a very different and much updated design over the others. I'm speaking here of the latest version, made of cast iron and steel, not the older aluminum versions. I own this press and have tested run out on it and was quite suprised and pleased. Apparently, the turret, though it has slop so it can rotate, is designed in conjunction with the "head" it rotates inside of in such a way that when you raise a case into the die, the turret raises to a point it meets a ledge in the top of the head. At that point, the turret seats against this ledge and is solid all the way around, thereby eliminating slop.

The net effect is the case has enough slop to align itself inside the side and by the time it's actually being sized, the press is as solid as any "O-frame" single stage. It's a great design and is more than heavy duty enough to out last it's owner and his owner's children.

With the advantages it offers over traditional turrets in automatic rotation, runout, ease of caliber changes, multiple calber changes, speed, priming on the press, case activated powder drop and expansion (pistol calibers) and an infinite number of caliber conversion at a low price (the cost of dies and a ten dollar turret), the Lee Classic Turret press simply makes the older designs obselete. The difference is 200 rounds per hour that have better runout than any of the traditional turrets vs. 50 rounds per hour of lesser quality ammo.

And that, my friends, is a better mousetrap for the money. A perfect press for most reloaders. If the thing had been available back when I bought my progressive, I would have never needed to buy a progressive.

Regards,

Dave

redactor
April 20, 2007, 11:16 AM
I'm new to reloading, but I bought the Redding T7 in early March.

It is big, heavy, and seems to work well. I load .45 Auto, 7.5 Swiss, and .303 Brit, and I can leave all three sets of dies in the press at all times.

Like some have said, it is a good middle-ground between a single-stage and a progressive. It obviously isn't as fast as a progressive.

The only bad thing I have to say about this press is that I don't like the optional "Auto Prime" attachment... I've had some problems with it, but perhaps I just haven't gotten used to it yet.

If I had to buy a new press, I'd get this same one. However, given how well this thing is built, I doubt that I'll ever have to.

tomj44
April 21, 2007, 01:52 PM
I have 2 Redding T-7 presses. They work good for me.

PO2Hammer
April 21, 2007, 02:31 PM
I've had my T7 for about a year now.

Great press. Everything indexes perfecly and smoothly.
I like being able to resize, reprime and flare my cases while handling them only once.

I use four die sets for .357 and .45acp. I can seat and crimp each case by just rotating between dies.

I put my .38 Super dies (3 die set) on the same plate as my .357 and put my .44 Rem Mag (3 die set) on the other plate with the .45acp dies.

Really a big time saver.

I shoot IHMSA Field Pistol and I get excellent accuracy from my handloads. I think the competition seating dies (Redding) and the 10X powder measure (again, Redding) get most of the accuracy credit. I know that the T-7 is not hindering accuracy though.

If you enjoyed reading about "Anyone have any experience with a Redding T7 Turret Press?" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!