Barrel link


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4thHorseman
June 17, 2003, 04:18 AM
I bought a used custom gun the other day. It was a Caspian. I notice the barrel link was sightly elongated where the (lack of the proper name) the handled pin you where you push on and then pull out to dissassemble the gun. The barrel pin is tight but the other end is elongated as if it was intentionally made about .005-.0010 larger. The thing (that is used for dissassembly) was not worn at all.
Any ideas? Is this done sometimes? Does it hurt anything?
I'm gonna get razzed for not knowing the correct the name for the part, but I'm sure you'll help. :D

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stans
June 17, 2003, 06:07 AM
I can't think of a good reason for the big hole in the barrel link to be oversized or elongated. An elongated hole could cause problems with consistant lock up and will definitely cause problems with consistant unlocking. Of course, if the barrel was improperly fitted and shot a lot, that could explain the elongated hole.

AZ Jeff
June 17, 2003, 03:03 PM
In the old days, before there were different length links available, pistolsmiths used to fit up barrels into M1911 pistols as follows:

1. Weld up hood and bottom lugs on barrel to add metal.
2. File away metal to achieve custom fit at barrel hood.
3. File away metal on bottom lugs to achieve tight fit against slide stop pin. (That's the part you take out to disassemble a M1911 pistol.)

Now once the above is done, and teh barrel fits tight up inside the slide when it's in battery, the barrel link needs to be refit.

Typically the link would be too short (the center to center distance between the two holes was too small). The solution to this was to open up the LOWER hole that the slide stop pin fit thru, so as to allow the linked barrel to fit up tight on the top of the slide stop pin when the pistol was in battery.

This made the hole for the slide stop pin in the barrel link sloppy, but that was acceptable, because the upper locked position of the barrel was controlled by the lugs resting on the topside of the slidestop pin, not by the link itself.

You probably have a pistol that is fitted this way.

Nowadays, a pistolsmith can use links that are oversize (longer center to center dimension on the two holes), so filing to fit is no longer necessary.

You can confirm this pistol is fitted this way by putting the barrel in position in the frame, and pass the slide stop pin thru the link without the slide in place. Then, attempt to pull the barrel forward, as if it was going to battery. If the pistol is fitted as I describe, the lugs on either side of the barrel link will rest solidly on TOP of the slide stop pin when the barrel is fully forward.

4thHorseman
June 17, 2003, 06:04 PM
AZ Jeff, can you contact me in reference to the gun info, e-mail or message form?

Jim K
June 17, 2003, 10:26 PM
FWIW, the barrel is locked into the slide when the barrel foot rides up on the slide stop, not by the link. If the barrel is held up by the link, it is able to wiggle, which is not good for accuracy. The link serves only to draw the barrel out of engagement with the slide on recoil; it is not needed to raise the barrel for lockup.

Play in the link engagement with the slide stop pin is normal.

Jim

4thHorseman
June 19, 2003, 04:23 AM
Thanks a lot guys for all your help.:)

bountyhunter
June 20, 2003, 06:10 PM
"FWIW, the barrel is locked into the slide when the barrel foot rides up on the slide stop, not by the link. If the barrel is held up by the link, it is able to wiggle, which is not good for accuracy. The link serves only to draw the barrel out of engagement with the slide on recoil; it is not needed to raise the barrel for lockup."

This is true for a properly fited 1911, but you won't see too many factory made junkers that are fitted this well. I see many that "ride the link". The lower barrel lugs don't touch the slide stop pin at all. In fact, many guns that don't shoot to point of aim are tweaked by the gunmaker by changing the link. There is enough "up - down" slop in the barrel fit for this.

Delmar
June 20, 2003, 11:20 PM
Wouldn't this elongated hole cause wear and battering on the slide stop pin and link? Doesn't sound good for longevity.

Jim K
June 21, 2003, 12:17 AM
Hi, Bountyhunter,

You are right. I should have said, "In a properly fitted 1911 type pistol.....". Most of the 1911 clones are far from properly fitted, and even supposedly "good brand" guns are not correct.

As to an elongated or large hole in the link causing excessive wear, I wouldn't worry about it. If the barrel foot is to cam up properly, there has to be some "slop" in the link hole, but it would take a long time for any real wear to occur.

Jim

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