Altering history


PDA






MMcfpd
April 23, 2007, 10:56 PM
For some time now, I've been sitting on what was apparently an NIB Tri-C Fox Wasp .45 ACP carbine from the early 1970s:

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s95/MMcfpd/Tommy_clone_NIB.jpg

Rare beast that it is, I'd found myself the reluctant custodian of a possibly virgin museum piece. Recent examination, though, has led me to believe that, although it appears new, it has been fired, albeit very few times. This, of course means...heh, heh...that I can fire it without any remorse over exploiting its hitherto thought to be pristine state.

But it needs a bit of help. What appears to be a buffer that has been sitting unused in the back of the receiver for, probably, over 30 years has deteriorated:

http://i150.photobucket.com/albums/s95/MMcfpd/Fox_Wasp_buffer.jpg

There's no way I'm locating an OEM buffer, so what can I fashion a replacement from? Any related thoughts, tips, etc.?

If you enjoyed reading about "Altering history" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
MilsurpShooter
April 24, 2007, 09:27 AM
Any idea what the buffer was originally made of? I would think if it was a soft rubber a silicon type of gel could be used. If it was a harder type plastic certain autoparts stores sell a compound that you mix together. Still has a little give but harder then silicon

taliv
April 24, 2007, 09:46 AM
if it's been fired, it's not NIB

it is pretty sweet looking though.

MMcfpd
April 24, 2007, 10:04 AM
if it's been fired, it's not NIB

That's the point of the whole endeavor.

It's hard to say what the original material was. What remains sheds little pieces that are similar to very old epoxy that has hardened and cracked.

LAK
April 24, 2007, 10:25 AM
Sounds like PVC or something similar.

I do not think it matters what you use as long as the dimensions do not intrude outside the original so as to interfere with operation. I would consider duplicating it using a piece of hard rubber glued in with a few dabs of cement here and there if you are only going to fire a few shots. This would be easily removeable afterwards, and that far back in the receiver I do not think heat will be an issue.

Some high temperature RTV from the autoparts store might be more permanent. Make a test for shrinkage when determining where you want it to settle in relation to everything else.

-----------------------------------------

http://ussliberty.org
http://ssunitedstates.org

Dionysusigma
April 24, 2007, 11:29 AM
What remains sheds little pieces that are similar to very old epoxy that has hardened and cracked.
Bakelite, maybe? :confused:

Or... hm. Fellow guitar players, doesn't this sound like the faulty orange rubber tubing found on most/all vintage guitar stands/racks? The material that's great at preventing nicks and scratches near the headstock, until the stand passes its 10-year-old mark. Older shops never replace the tubing, and it either comes off in brittle flakes or sticks to and stains the guitar permanently.

Who knows... the resin-impregnated material might just be the adhesive itself (if the buffer was glued in place :uhoh: ).

(if any part of the above makes no sense, I blame sleep deprivation)

If you enjoyed reading about "Altering history" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!