"Gunism" is a "cultural disease."


PDA






Legionnaire
April 25, 2007, 06:51 AM
This from today's Chronicle of Higher Education. Did you know that an inanimate object can become a "psychological actor?" :barf:

The Chronicle of Higher Education
Wednesday, April 25, 2007

Opinion: An Ideology of 'Gunism'
By ROBERT JAY LIFTON

The combination of mental disease and access to guns leaps out at almost everyone in connection with the Virginia Tech shootings. But from there, ideas and advocacies tend to become amorphous and tinged with hopelessness.

There is consensus that something should be done to intervene earlier in threatening forms of psychological disturbance, and, as a psychiatrist, I agree and also recognize some of the social obstacles to doing so. But while there will always be mentally ill people, a few of whom are violent, it is our gun-centered cultural disease that converts mental illness into massacre.

Indeed, I would claim that a gun is not just a lethal device but a psychological actor in this terrible drama. Guns and ammunition were at the heart of Seung-Hui Cho's elaborate orchestration of the event and of his Rambo-like self-presentation to the world. When you look at those pictures, you understand how a gun can merge so fully with a person that a man who makes regular use of it could (in the historical West and in Hollywood) become known as a "gun."

Some years ago, the distinguished historian Richard Hofstadter told me that, after a lifetime of studying American culture, what he found most deeply troubling was our country's inability to come to terms with the gun -- which in turn strongly affected our domestic and international attitudes. Emotions of extreme attachment to and even sacralization of the gun pervade American society, and commercial interests shamelessly manipulate those emotions to produce wildly self-destructive policies.

Much has been said, with considerable truth, about the role of the frontier in bringing about this psychological condition. I would go further and suggest that American society, in the absence of an encompassing and stable traditional culture, has embraced the gun as a substitute for that absence, and created a vast cultural ideology we can call "gunism."

Paradoxically, this highly destabilizing object became viewed as a baseline and an icon that could somehow sustain us in a new form of nontraditional society. That new society was to be democratic and egalitarian, so that the gun could be both an "equalizer," as it is sometimes known, and also a solution to various social problems.

That idea of the gun as ultimate solution reached a kind of mad absurdity in Newt Gingrich's recent suggestion that university killings be prevented by having students carrying hidden guns into classrooms. The gun as ultimate solution has also played a significant role in American military misadventures in Vietnam and Iraq, and in our attitudes toward nuclear weapons (as gigantic "guns").

With a problem so deep-seated, it is no wonder that suggestions of changing gun policies have been so readily dismissed as "an old story" (which unfortunately they are), as politically unfeasible, and as generally useless. But even deep-seated cultural patterns can be altered, and there is considerable support for altering this one. Indeed, America is a country in which change itself is a dominant cultural pattern. We need to make quick small changes and slower, more fundamental ones. But to do that, we require a diagnosis of our cultural disease.

Robert Jay Lifton is a lecturer in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and professor emeritus of psychiatry at the City University of New York Graduate Center.

If you enjoyed reading about ""Gunism" is a "cultural disease."" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!
Dr. Dickie
April 25, 2007, 07:03 AM
...after a lifetime of studying American culture, what he found most deeply troubling was our country's inability to come to terms with the gun -- which in turn strongly affected our domestic and international attitudes. Emotions of extreme attachment to and even sacralization of the gun pervade American society, and commercial interests shamelessly manipulate those emotions to produce wildly self-destructive policies.

Change the word "gun" to "anti-gun", and I think you sum up the authors own psychological problem.
I think that maybe the author has a unhealthy fixation on an inanimate object. Coupled to his projecting his own "penis envy" complex on to the object, and thereby giving it magical, supernatural powers.

Paradoxically, this highly destabilizing object became viewed as a baseline and an icon that could somehow sustain us in a new form of nontraditional society. That new society was to be democratic and egalitarian, so that the gun could be both an "equalizer," as it is sometimes known, and also a solution to various social problems.

Where the hell did he make this stuff up? I think someone needs to read something other than the Communist Manifesto, a little reality would be nice.
Note that the piece is an opinion piece. Nice that he does not have to produce any of those pesky "facts" to put forth his own delusional opinion.
I would hope that the readers of the periodical would read it in that light.

DigitalWarrior
April 25, 2007, 07:13 AM
Man it takes a certain amount of college before you can believe that kind of stuff.

ConfuseUs
April 25, 2007, 07:15 AM
it is our gun-centered cultural disease that converts mental illness into massacre.


That's charming, being labelled mentally ill for belonging to a serious segment of American culture. I bet this supercilious pundit would never indulge in cultural bigotry concerning the widespread practice in the Islamic world of culturing self-destructive mental illness in order to procure guided bombs for attacking innocent men, women, and children. :rolleyes:

El Tejon
April 25, 2007, 07:32 AM
I agree therefore we need strict control over the media. How many times have you been in Blockbuster and noticed all the DVD covers with actors/actresses mugging with guns?

We need reasonable control over the media. Serial numbers on all books and movies, background checks before purchase, police approval of all newscasts, $200 tax on all televisions and radios, inter alia.

Remember, if it save one life, it is worth it. And if does not, so what? The elite of other nations will deem us more civilised.

Pax Jordana
April 25, 2007, 07:37 AM
Yeah, more than a few of my partners have gotten gunism. We're waiting on the results of a court-ordered blood test.



wait - a CULTURAL disease?


(It's an opinion piece, he has no requirement to produce facts.)

30 cal slob
April 25, 2007, 07:51 AM
i freely admit to being a gunist, and have lots of mind-blowing gunasms.

Legionnaire
April 25, 2007, 08:06 AM
30 cal slob, glad I put my coffee down! :D

JohnL2
April 25, 2007, 08:08 AM
That is one of the most IDIOTIC things I've read in a very long time. And I read The Onion and The Darwin Awards. With all respect to Mr. Lifton as a scholar, but I pity his students.
Mad absurdity that a CCW holder could've stopped the rampage??? Unbelievable. If not for University rules someone could've put a bullet between that guys eyes. How quickly we forget that not too long ago in Utah a gunman was cut down in a hail of bullets from police and an off-duty officer. The off-duty officer holding the gunman at bay until police arrived.
At least dumb people have an excuse. But this guy is a psychiatrist AND a lecturer.

Sylvan-Forge
April 25, 2007, 08:26 AM
My spoof:


Opinion: An Ideology of 'Victimism'
By oo7

The combination of mental disease and access to disarmed victims leaps out at many folks in connection with the Virginia Tech shootings. But from there, ideas and advocacies of disarmament tend to become amorphous and tinged with idiocy.

There is growing consensus that something should be done to engender a sense of personal responsibility. I agree and also recognize some of the social obstacles to doing so. But while there will always be mentally ill people, a few of whom are violent, it is the elitists' disdain of the second amendment that allows mental illness to become a massacre.

Indeed, I would claim that an elitist mentality is not just a hypocrisy but an open invitation to this terrible drama. Insanity and vengence were at the heart of the VT shooter's elaborate orchestration of the event and of his demon-like self-presentation to the world. When you look at those pictures, you wonder why he didn't try lashing out at a police station, a military base or a shooting range. Instead he chose a place that the elites in power set up for him. A place where his victims would be disarmed by wishy-washy feel-good policy.

Some years ago, the marxist turned historian, Richard Hofstadter told me that, after a lifetime of studying American culture, what he found most deeply troubling was our country's inability to come to terms with the gun -- which in turn strongly affected our domestic and international attitudes. Emotions of extreme attachment to and even sacralization of the gun pervade American society, and commercial interests shamelessly manipulate those emotions to produce wildly self-destructive policies. I laughed.
I always thought he was a ****.

Much has been said, with considerable ignorance, about the role of the frontier in bringing about this so-called psychological condition. I counter this notion and suggest that American society, in the absence of an encompassing and stable traditional culture, has embraced the government as a substitute for that absence, and created a vast cultural ideology we can call "victimism."

Paradoxically, this highly destabilizing ideal became viewed as a security blanket and a "nanny" that could somehow sustain us in a new form of nontraditional society. That new society was to be socialistic and statist, so that the state could be both a "tyranny" as it is sometimes known, and also a solution to various social engineering troubles.

That idea of the gun as the ultimate equalizer reached a kind of curious epiphany in Newt Gingrich's recent suggestion that university killings be prevented by having students carrying hidden guns into classrooms. On this, I believe Newt to be correct.

With a problem so deep-seated, it is no wonder that suggestions of changing elitist policies have been so readily dismissed as "conspiracy theory" (which unfortunately they are), as politically unfeasible, and as generally useless. But even deep-seated cultural patterns can be altered, and there is growing support for altering this one. Indeed, America is a country in which change itself is a dominant cultural pattern. We need to make quick small changes and slower, more fundamental ones. But to do that, we require understanding of our cultural disease.

oo7 is a regular contributer at The High Road and professor of Rock at the University of Hard Knox.

BigG
April 25, 2007, 08:26 AM
Sometimes it takes a college eddication to perfect an idiot. Looks like that one's done. Stick a fork in it! ;)

geekWithA.45
April 25, 2007, 08:47 AM
Some years ago, the distinguished historian Richard Hofstadter told me that, after a lifetime of studying American culture, what he found most deeply troubling was our country's inability to come to terms with the gun --

No, what Hofstadter found troubling was that our society did not come to HIS terms with guns.

250+ million of us have come to perfectly good terms with our guns. We know what they are, how to use them, and when to put them away.

Avenger29
April 25, 2007, 08:54 AM
So, if I have a psychological disorder because I am a shooter, can I get money from the government for my disability?

More money for ammo?:evil:

romma
April 25, 2007, 08:59 AM
oo7, That is priceless... Forward it to that Blissninny...

30 cal slob
April 25, 2007, 09:07 AM
Celebrate Hoplophilia.

ProficientRifleman
April 25, 2007, 09:11 AM
it is our gun-centered cultural disease that converts mental illness into massacre.

He is a Liar.

It is our FEAR-ism, our SUBMISSIVE-ism, and our PACIF-ism which leads to massacres.

Hoplophobes fully subscribe to the notion that fear and ignorance is preferable to knowledge and proficiency.

SamTuckerMTNMAN
April 25, 2007, 09:25 AM
free to use 007's piece on websites?

ST

2TransAms
April 25, 2007, 09:35 AM
I have gunism? Can I get a few days off work for that?

"Gotta stay home,boss. My gunism's actin' up today."

nonquixote
April 25, 2007, 10:00 AM
It seems to me that much of what Dr. Lifton says is correct... when seen from his philosophical viewpoint. The Modern Socialist Medical Ethos views life, health, and security as by far the most important values of modern civilization, (Better Red than dead?) and liberty trails distantly behind.

Most of us here however are of the mindset that life loses much of its value when deprived of the liberty to live it as we ourselves choose, and our country was founded with this as the primary value. (Give me Liberty or give me death!) The problem with this freedom though is that the bad people who are willing to harm others for their personal gain are just as free (or more so) than the vast majority of good people. This is what sometimes makes it necessary for the good people to defend themselves with force. This is therefore, a necessary evil in a free society and not something that is "fixable" without sacrificing the freedom that this country was founded upon.

So, because of human beings being the flawed creatures that we are, the "cultural disease of Gunism" is in fact the cultural disease of freedom, the two are inseparable.

Are you willing to surrender some essential liberty to try to buy a little safety? Alot of well intentioned folks are, this is the modern American dichotomy, and why we must always be vigilant to prevent the well intentioned from selling our freedom down the road so they can feel safer.

Tarwater
April 25, 2007, 10:06 AM
Emotions of extreme attachment to and even sacralization of the gun pervade American society, and commercial interests shamelessly manipulate those emotions to produce wildly self-destructive policies. I laughed.
I always thought he was a ****.

I just woke my roommate up with my laughing.

ccw9mm
April 25, 2007, 10:13 AM
"Gunism" is a "cultural disease."
So is death by policy.

Sylvan-Forge
April 25, 2007, 10:14 AM
Sure, go for it SamTuckerMTNMAN.

I don't know copyright law, but I guess as long as it is mentioned that it is a spoof and the full title and name of the original author is given, all should be well.

I just woke my roommate up with my laughing.
Always happy to help :D

JWarren
April 25, 2007, 11:11 AM
it is our gun-centered cultural disease that converts mental illness into massacre.


My medical insurance company will be calling soon to figure out why I put in a claim for a 1911 race gun.


--John

Old Fuff
April 25, 2007, 11:11 AM
Do notice where this "opinion" was first published:

The Chronicle of Higher Education

I suspect that many if not most of that publication’s readers there will agree with what he said, and will consider that it expresses their own feelings about the issue.

This is why, after Virginia passed legislation that would have allowed adult students and staff to CCW on the campus, Virginia Tech's administration and other universities fought tooth & nail to get changes made so that they could prevent this happening, and even today continue to defend that policy.

This is also why a large majority of public school administrations are doing everything they can, through "zero tolerance" policies, to destroy any knowledge of, or participation in the "gun culture" their students might have or be inclined too do as they come of age.

The writer is a left-wing fruitcake, but don't underestimate the damage he and others that agree with him can do, as they work to create their vision of the perfect Socialist society in the United States.

Justin
April 25, 2007, 11:58 AM
Typical.

Anything outside of his area of interest or expertise must be an indicator of mental disorder.

His fear of what he does not understand, and the resulting phobia is practically palpable.

DirksterG30
April 25, 2007, 12:36 PM
His article is proof that higher education and intelligence are not always directly related.

Sage of Seattle
April 25, 2007, 01:08 PM
oo7 beat me to it (and brilliantly I might add).

I always thought he was a ****.

That about sums it up for me, but I'll post what I came up with anyway.

Indeed, I would claim that a knife is not just a lethal device but a psychological actor in this terrible drama. Knives and sharpeners were at the heart of that man's elaborate orchestration of the event and of his Yojimbo-like self-presentation to the world. When you look at those pictures, you understand how a knife can merge so fully with a person that a man who makes regular use of it could (in the historical East and in Ikeda) become known as a "blade."

Some years ago, the distinguished Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi told me that, after a lifetime of studying Japanese culture, what he found most deeply troubling was our country's inability to come to terms with the knife -- which in turn strongly affected our domestic and international attitudes. Emotions of extreme attachment to and even sacralization of the knife pervade Japanese society, and commercial interests shamelessly manipulate those emotions to produce wildly self-destructive policies.

(Inspired by http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/1376982.stm )

Waitone
April 25, 2007, 01:09 PM
I was struck by the similarity of language and themes to that used during the Vietnam War as a slam against those who either participated or supported it.

Mad Turner
April 25, 2007, 02:02 PM
I am English and have, perhaps, a different perception of the gun. I am a shooter of target as I am too squeamish to shoot animals but we do have a lot of people in this country who hunt deer and foxes and shoot ducks and geese etc. I think that guns should be regulated so that they were not so completely readily available, but an honest citizen should be able to acquire a firearm through a proper legal system with the proper police authority and a certificate from a doctor to the effect that there is no known adverse history of mental illness or depression. VT is a dreadfull occurance which every lover of guns finds as abhorant as the next and we know that the boy who committed that crime has damaged our reputation even though we did no more than go about our business in a law abiding fashion. It took the United Kingdom six days to kill as many people as those who died at VT but we used the automobile. Every day eight people are killed by the motor car in the UK but when I point out this fact to the anti-gun lobby they tell me that this is different. When I enquire where is it different they tell me that we need motor cars and so those eight every day are just an unfortunate statistic. I dont understand this, either way the victim is dead, how can there be different kinds of dead? Further to that we know that 'road rage' is a known phenomena where people lose their head to a madness where they will do anything to win. To win what, one space in front of the next guy. Authority never wants to know the statistic of the comparison of gun death against automobile death because they know they are on a hiding to nothing.
Kitchen knife - great for cutting meat or stabbing people
Golf club - great for a pleasant afternoon or hitting people
Base ball bat - same
Lots of other every day things - great for what they were made for or killing people
A closed mind is closed just as a dead person is dead. It's easier to give birth than raise the dead so concentrate on educating the young people about civilization and democracy and the rights of all citizens including having guns if that is what you want.

Mad Turner

obxned
April 25, 2007, 02:24 PM
The only reason idiots like this manage to transmit their damaged genetic material to a new generation of idiots is because decent people have made life safer for them by not giving in to evil.

His kind are the dodo birds of the human race. Worse, they allow evil people to have what they want, re-enforcing the evil behavior.

Geronimo45
April 25, 2007, 02:25 PM
I like this article. My love for guns is a mental disease.

I need rehab. Belt-fed rehab.

RealGun
April 25, 2007, 02:26 PM
I figure that wanting to ignore or tear down the fact that "gunism" is honored by the US Constitution is a worse "cultural disease".

Sharps-shooter
April 25, 2007, 02:36 PM
He does sound a bit off-base, doesn't he? After all, how can a gun be an actor of any sort. it doesn't act, really.

I definitely think it's true that attitudes towards violence in this country are... weird, in a way. Like it or not, this country (like many another) was founded on violence. And that may be part of it. But then there is the lack of realism when it comes to portrayal of guns and violence. I find that annoying. It's always either the newspapers going on about how evil guns are (unless they belong to "your friends, the government"), or the movies portraying guns as much more powerful than they really are (my favorite example being the scene in the bourne identity, where the protagonist fires a bird hunting shell from an old double gun, and it creates a huge explosion). Everyone likes power.

To me, one side of it is very much analogous to american attitudes about cars. People love the power that a car gives them. The difference is that there isn't as much of the questioning about them. How many people were killed by cars on the day of VA Tech killings? Nobody even mentioned it on the news.

Legionnaire
April 25, 2007, 04:52 PM
Lots of good, thoughtful, and entertaining follow-ups here. I particularly like oo7's spoof. Excellent!

Sharps-shooter, you said, I definitely think it's true that attitudes towards violence in this country are... weird, in a way. Like it or not, this country (like many another) was founded on violence. And that may be part of it. I think this is more than "part of it." Our country was founded by those who thought there were values worth dying for, and they understood violence in this light. Much of today's society is as self-absorbed as Cho was, and they don't see anything as being valuable enough to die for. Unfortunately, one can become so self-absorbed that one also doesn't see anything worth living for, which seems to be where Cho ended up. But feel-gooders like Lifton have lost the idea that lawful violence against evil is a service to society.

ctdonath
April 25, 2007, 08:00 PM
"Some ideas are so preposterous only an intellectual could believe them."
- George Orwell

Cosmoline
April 25, 2007, 08:20 PM
"gunism"--newspeak of the week!

michiganfan
April 25, 2007, 08:23 PM
I have had a load of college education and I still aint buying a lod of bull like this.

nonquixote
April 25, 2007, 08:25 PM
I think that guns should be regulated so that they were not so completely readily available, but an honest citizen should be able to acquire a firearm through a proper legal system with the proper police authority and a certificate from a doctor to the effect that there is no known adverse history of mental illness or depression.

Mad Turner, The problem many of us have with this idea is that then what we consider a basic right, the right to self defense, comes at the suffrance of a government who might not always have benevolent intentions. The long term consequences of this could be (and historically have been shown to be) much worse than living with rare random outbreaks of violence.

Moondoggie
April 25, 2007, 08:41 PM
Loved oo7's spoof!

We all know that Ph. D. stands for "Piled Higher and Deeper". There's no doubt that the original author is a Ph. D.

Dienekes
April 25, 2007, 08:41 PM
Lifton made his reputation right around the Korean War on the topic of brainwashing and later expanded that into the area of cults. He was well respected and pretty much the authority on those topics for a while. He got goofier and goofier during the 60s and Vietnam. He has got to be at least in his 80s at this point and like Cronkite, ought to know when to give it a rest.

Somebody probably called him up for an op-ed piece and he couldn't resist the spotlight once more.

I once read that the real purpose of an education was to be able to know when a man is talking nonsense. These days that is probably more important than ever.

Legionnaire
April 26, 2007, 08:30 AM
Here's a good alternate view from Daniel Henninger in the Wall Street Journal's Opinion Journal:
A lot has been made of the police failure to apprehend Cho for two hours. Fair enough, but that's not typical. In the Safe Schools 37 incidents, most of the attacks were stopped by administrator or teachers, largely because half didn't last longer than 15 minutes. The cops stopped only 25% of the attacks--an argument for deputizing and arming someone in the schools. (In testimony this week to the Senate Homeland Security Committee, the head of the association for all campus cops explained the "safety issues" that mainly keeps them distracted: "At the top of the list are issues related to high-risk drinking and the use and abuse of illegal and prescription drugs.")
Full article at this link: http://www.opinionjournal.com/columnists/dhenninger/?id=110009988

HuntCast
April 26, 2007, 09:22 AM
Maybe someone could write a slam dunk rebuttal?

The Chronicle of Higher Education
1255 Twenty-Third Street, N.W.
Seventh Floor
Washington, D.C. 20037
202-466-1000
FAX: 202-452-1033

News tips, comments, suggestions, and corrections: editor@chronicle.com

mnrivrat
April 26, 2007, 11:13 AM
I guess I can just cut and paste from a response I gave on another thread -

"A dumb ass with a degree is just an educated dumb ass - not an expert"

The trouble with too many shrinks is that they feel compelled to have wisdom well behond their abilitys .

Mad Turner
April 27, 2007, 05:25 PM
I understand what you say and appreciate your point. We have gangsters in this country and even though we have laws about keeping guns they very unsportingly ignore the rules and carry concealed handguns when the rest of us legal, honest, decent and ethical people aren't even allowed them. I began my post by saying that I think the English perception is at variance with the American view. We have, I think, never been allowed to carry a gun for self defence and the policeman carrying a gun is still relegated to places where it is thought that terrorist attack might occur such as airports but the ordinary policeman going about his job does not have a gun. I think that the English at large do not want guns for self defence as our culture has never required it. This is not to say that we have not had outbursts of violence. The last one happened at Dunblane in Scotland in1996 when a man went berserk in a school and killed 16 children and one teacher and that remains our worst attack on children. The time before that was 1987 when a guy went on the rampage with an AK 47 and a Bereta pistol and killed sixteen people and wounded fifteen others. Following the 1987 attack the government banned semi - auto guns and after the 1996 attack the government banned all handguns. They thought they could reduce gun crime with these measures but gun crime continues to rise year after year but the fact remains that 'only' about 160 people are killed with guns annually whereas the motor car kills 3500.
Regards
Mad Turner

Happyshooter
April 27, 2007, 06:33 PM
Turn the word "gun" into "afro" or "jewish hat" and mail the article back to him. Wait for the screaming.

heypete
April 27, 2007, 07:27 PM
Gunism? Is that like "racism" or any of the other bad -isms?

Thus, would someone who buys Perazzi shotguns but looks down on Hi-Points be a "gunist"? (Or just someone with way too much money.:D )

I happen to be a rather discriminating owner of firearms, and avoid low-quality products. Am I a gunist? Uh-oh. :eek:

Standing Wolf
April 27, 2007, 07:42 PM
I think that guns should be regulated so that they were not so completely readily available, but an honest citizen should be able to acquire a firearm through a proper legal system with the proper police authority and a certificate from a doctor to the effect that there is no known adverse history of mental illness or depression.

Trusting government to protect individual rights is like asking the coyotes to guard the hen house: not the course of wisdom.

jimacp
April 27, 2007, 10:45 PM
Why is it that so many psychiatrists - psychologists are fruitcakes?? My theory is that its sort of like why so many evangelists lead secret perverted lives.....they are preaching to or psychoanaylsing themselves.

Blue .45
April 27, 2007, 11:02 PM
But while there will always be mentally ill people, a few of whom are violent, it is our gun-centered cultural disease that converts mental illness into massacre.

Guess we're fortunate we don't have a car bomb-centered cultural disease like they do in Iraq.

Kentak
April 27, 2007, 11:39 PM
Plop the professor and his family down in the middle of a crime riddled community, make them live and work there for a few months, and then ask him if he still thinks the desire for a gun is a mental illness, or a survival tool.

K

sm
April 27, 2007, 11:44 PM
"Gunism" is a "cultural disease."



Tyranny is a Control Epidemic.

Old Fuff
April 27, 2007, 11:46 PM
If that doesn't work, put him in an isolated house in a rural part of Cochise County AZ. on the Mexican border... :evil:

44AMP
April 28, 2007, 01:00 AM
The part about how the "belief in the gun..." being responsible for our military misadventures in Iraq and Vietnam.


This professor certainly fits my definition of being a danger to himself and others. Really, people with their heads so far removed from reality should not be allowed to roam around loose. And the certainly should not be allowed access to young minds!

perhaps his next diatribe will be about how our cultural obsession with fire has led to the death of billions of animals being cooked for food! And this horrid state of affairs has been going on for literally thousands upon thousands of years! Oh, the horror!

Mad Turner
April 28, 2007, 05:17 PM
Standing Wolf I like your analogy of government protection being the same as the coyotes protecting the hens and although I have tried to express the general attitude of the UK citizens I personaly lean toward the way that you boys in America think. If you have not seen it already there is an article in American Handgunner on line edition titled 'Gun Rights' three decades of gun rights. It is a most interesting article and spells out just how the right to bear arms has been misinterpreted by those who would seek to remove guns from your possession. I would like to hear your comment on this.
Mad Turner

Baba Louie
April 28, 2007, 07:20 PM
MT,
Are you referring to Jeff Snyder's essays?
http://www.americanhandgunner.com/GunRght.html

Gunism... brought about by too much American Liberty. Or maybe it's the other way around. Ya can't have too many guns or too much liberty. They can both lead individuals to thinking they live in a free state instead of being governed by their betters... which seems to annoy some people for some reason.

If you enjoyed reading about ""Gunism" is a "cultural disease."" here in TheHighRoad.org archive, you'll LOVE our community. Come join TheHighRoad.org today for the full version!