New hi-tech scopes for snipers?


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Preacherman
April 26, 2007, 09:57 PM
From the 'Danger Room (http://blog.wired.com/defense/2007/04/darpa_snipers.html)' blog at Wired News:

Thursday, April 26, 2007

Next-Gen Scopes for Can't-Miss Snipers

American snipers are already deadly accurate, pinpointing targets from a thousand meters away and more. But a heavy crosswind can throw off even the surest shot. Which is why the military has started a largely-secret, crash program to build laser gunsights that compensate for the environment -- giving snipers lethal precision at 2000 meters range, in winds up to 40 miles per hour. If it works out as planned, Defense Department researchers think the scopes will boost a sniper's kill-rate by ten-fold, or more, and let snipers "engage and pull the trigger" in "less than one second."

Unlike most efforts from Darpa, the Pentagon's ordinarily-futuristic research agency, this "One Shot" program is meant almost to yield immediate battlefield results. The goal is to have prototype sights by the fall of 2008, and production-ready scopes that can be mounted on standard sniper rifles a year later. That would seem to put it far ahead of Darpa's companion effort, for detecting and "neutralizing" enemy gunmen -- before they fire.

Today, the agency notes, "a 10mph wind could produce a miss even at 400 meters while in other cases the deviation could be much worse, exceeding 3 meters at 1200 meters range." To compensate, sniper/spotter teams have to make all sorts of difficult calculations while being swamped with stress. Darpa wants the scope to the those calculations on its own. Agency researchers have two methods in mind, to make that happen.

The first method (to grossly, grossly oversimplify), is to shoot out a series of thousands of laser pulses, creating a "profile" of the "eddies" in the local atmosphere as the light bounces back. The second involves using use a high-speed camera to take an image of the target. The eddies distort the phase of the light in that picture. The scope, through a series of algorithms, can take those into account for the sniper team.

Algorithms for the second approach have already been developed and field tested at University of Maryland's Intelligent Optics Laboratory, Pentagon documents show, helping target objects 2300 meters away.

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MechAg94
April 26, 2007, 10:12 PM
Does anyone use systems that detect laser range finders and target markers?

taliv
April 27, 2007, 12:32 AM
that sounds pretty spiffy, preacherman, but i find myself wondering if the researchers at the University of Maryland's Intelligent Optics Laboratory realize bullets don't travel in straight lines. I could be mistaken, but even a 50bmg is going to drop 150odd feet at that range, and be pushed about 70' off course by a 40mph wind.

unless i've just wildly miscalculated, which is entirely possible as I'm half asleep, the bullet would peak about 51' over line of sight. at that distance, the FOV on a 25x S&B PMII is 68'.

Zak Smith
April 27, 2007, 12:54 AM
Google around for "wind measurement laser" and there is all sorts of interesting research going on.

MechAg--

If you look through a set of PVS-14's, the output beam of a laser rangefinder is visible like a laser pointer would be, on the object it hits, as well as its emitter.

-z

PercyShelley
April 27, 2007, 02:57 AM
Why not use a sonic measurement? Spit out a bunch of ultrasound bat style, and measure the doppler shift on any grit that happens to be in the air to bounce back your signal. It would have a much larger field of view than a laser, and be rather less detectable.

The Good
April 27, 2007, 05:25 PM
ok so it accounts for windage only right?

~z
April 27, 2007, 05:47 PM
If I had something that "accounts for windage only " I doubt I'd ever miss. Sounds handy to me. However, I am fortuinate enough that I shoot for fun and enjoy the wind.
~z

KD7ONE
April 28, 2007, 08:57 PM
I just found the perfect scope:

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/pod/horizontal-pod.jsp?_DARGS=/cabelas/en/common/catalog/pod-link.jsp_A&_DAV=MainCatcat602007-cat20760&rid=&indexId=cat20760&navAction=push&masterpathid=&navCount=1&parentType=index&parentId=cat20760&id=0044129

Zak Smith
April 28, 2007, 09:06 PM
The Diarange has a second focal plane reticle and its knob setup is behind the curve for high-end LR riflescops. A BDC reticle has disadvantages and drawbacks, and in a SFP configuration is only usable at one magnification setting. State of the art for knob-based elevation specification looks more like S&B's USMC contract scope (which is almost identical to a PMII).

-z

MachIVshooter
April 28, 2007, 11:23 PM
Why not use a sonic measurement? Spit out a bunch of ultrasound bat style, and measure the doppler shift on any grit that happens to be in the air to bounce back your signal

Too slow and too easy to detect. It would take about 12 seconds from emission to reception at 2,000 meters, depending on altitude. Laser is virtually instantaneous. Also, Sonar is not as accurate in atmosphere as it is in more dense mediums, such as water.

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